The impact of support services teams: Community-based behavioral health support interventions

Owen, R., Bowers, A., Heller, T., Hsieh, K. and Gould, R. (2016).  The impact of support services teams: Community-based behavioral health support interventions. Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities. doi:10.1111/jppi.12186.

Abstract

Background: Community capacity to serve people with intellectual/developmental disabilities (IDD) and behavioral health challenges is often limited. Using interdisciplinary teams to work with stakeholders, including people with IDD, their families, providers, and agencies may help increase this capacity. One example in the United States is the Support Services Teams (SST) program of a midwestern state. Specific Aims: This research aimed to identify changes before to after referral to SST in the proportion of people who used and the total number of admissions/visits, and prescriptions; and the Medicaid liability associated with emergency room (ER), hospital, and pharmacy services for SST participants. Second, the research described the SST participants and services provided. Method: The authors used Wilcoxon and McNemar’s tests to compare hospital, ER, and pharmacy outcome measures for 109 people who were referred to SST and had 12 months of data before and after referral. Separate analyses were also conducted for the 88 people who remained in the community after referral and the 21 people who had short institutional stays. Findings: For the full population of SST participants, the proportion of people with a hospital admission, the total number of hospital admissions, and Medicaid liability for hospitalizations significantly decreased from before to after referral to SST. Medicaid liability for prescriptions significantly decreased for people with an institutional stay. Changes in the other outcomes trended downwards, although not significantly. Discussion: This study shows that the use of interdisciplinary teams for people with IDD and behavioral health challenges can be effective in reducing the use of services. These teams can help to build community capacity to work with these individuals and avoid more costly ER and hospital services and reduce the number of medications prescribed.

Aging and Developmental Disability: Current Research, Programming, and Practice Implications

Aging and Developmental Disability: Current Research, Programming, and Practice Implications (2001). Hammel, J. & Nochajski, S. Binghamton: The Haworth Press

This book explores the research findings and practice implications pertaining to normative and disability-related aging. It discusses the effectiveness of specific interventions for aging adults with intellectual and related developmental disabilities, including assistive technology and environmental intervention. The book provides web site resources to disability organizations, databases, and other sites.

ISBN: 0-7890-1040-2 
COST PER UNIT: $22.95 (soft cover); $39.95 (hardcover)
Order directly from The Haworth Press at
www.haworthpress.com or 1-800-429-6784

Outcomes of Assistive Technology Services and Use by Adults with Developmental Disabilities

Outcomes of Assistive Technology Services and Use by Adults with Developmental Disabilities (1998). Hammel, J., Heller, T., & Ying, G.,  RESNA 1998 Annual Conference Proceedings, pp.14-16.

A report of an outcome study of AT service delivery, use, and relationship to functional status changes over time. The study was conducted among adults specifically with cerebral palsy and mental retardation living in the community.

Aging With Developmental Disabilities: An Information Packet on Understanding Age-Related Changes and Supporting Successful Aging

Aging With Developmental Disabilities: An Information Packet on Understanding Age-Related Changes and Supporting Successful Aging (1997). Factor, A.

This packet provides a basic understanding of age-related changes and their implications for adults with developmental disabilities and their families. Topics include: the aging process and its implications; supporting individual choice and community membership; and engaging and supporting older families in making future plans for their relative with a disability. It contains guidelines and practical suggestions for supporting individual choice and community membership, healthy aging and family future planning.

Assistive Technology and You: A Guide For Families and Persons With Disabilities

Assistive Technology and You: A Guide For Families and Persons With Disabilities (1997), Hedman, G., Hooyenga, K.,Politano, P. & Sposato, B.

This guidebook provides information about the various uses of assistive technology for accessibility, activities of daily living, augmentative communication, computer access, environmental control, seating, mobility, and work site modification. It contains photographs and descriptions of devices, their applications, and guidelines to help families and users become informed consumers in selecting equipment. The guide was written by assistive technology clinicians and reviewed by consumers, families and community agency professionals. It was developed by the Assistive Technology Unit at the Institute on Disability and Human Development in collaboration with the RRTC on Aging with Developmental Disabilities.

Older Adults With Mental Retardation and Their Families

Older Adults With Mental Retardation and Their Families (1997). Heller, T. A chapter in Bray, N. W. (Ed.) International Review of Research in Mental Retardation-Vol 20.

This chapter addresses the needs of older adults with mental retardation and their families from a psychosocial model that examines age-related changes and from the broader perspective of demographic and service trends affecting this population.

ISBN: 0-12366-2206
COST PER UNIT: $104.95
Order directly from Academic Press, 525 B. Street, Suite 1900, San Diego, CA 92101-4495, USA;

Or order it online here.