Crip for a Day – New research shows role-playing disability promotes distress, discomfort and disinterest 

Source: New research shows role-playing disability promotes distress, discomfort and disinterest

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28287757

Professionals in the fields of education and rehabilitation psychology have long used disability simulations to try to promote understanding and improve attitudes about persons with disabilities. To simulate blindness, for instance, participants might complete tasks while wearing blindfolds or goggles. Others use earplugs to mimic deafness. Others may navigate indoor and outdoor areas in a wheelchair. The idea is to boost empathy by giving people perspective on what it is like to have a disability.

However, a recent study published by Michelle Nario-Redmond, Ph.D., professor of psychology, reveals that disability simulations often result in feelings of fear, apprehension and pity toward those with disabilities, proving Nario-Redmond’s thesis that disability simulations do more harm than good.

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Success for Students and Nurses with Disabilities: A Call to Action for Nurse Educators

Marks, B. & McCulloh, K. (2016). Success for Students and Nurses with Disabilities: A Call to Action for Nurse Educators, Nurse Educator, 41(1), 9-12. doi: 10.1097/NNE.0000000000000212.

This article presents a ‘‘call to action’’ for nurse educators to identify and implement best practices supporting the success of students with disabilities given recent federal legislative changes. Best practices for educating students with disabilities in nursing education are discussed. Increasing our understanding of disability from a variety of models—not just the medical model—will promote greater diversity and inclusivity within the nursing profession, which will enhance patient care.

Success for Students and Nurses with Disabilities: A Call to Action for Nurse Educators

Faculty Training Modules: Working with students with disabilities

UCSF Medical Student Disability Services (MSDS) and UCSF Student Disability Services (SDS) in partnership with colleagues from around the country (Case Western Reserve University, Duke University, Northwestern University, Rush University College of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, The University of Washington, and Weill Cornell Medicine and Samuel Merritt University), developed The UCSF Faculty Training Series, an eight part online, video training series to guide faculty who work with students with disabilities. New modules will be posted each month.

The new modules include:
Keeping it Confidential: Guidance for working with students with disabilities
 
                                                           and


Accessible Admissions Practices: Making sure students with disabilities are addressed

Four additional modules are planned for this series including: 
  1. Microaggressions: What they are and how they impact students with disabilities
  2. ADA 101: The basic laws that govern disability services
  3. Accommodations in the Clinical Setting
  4. Full Circle in the Diversity initiative: Inviting Disability to the table

 

Just and Realistic Expectations for Persons with Disabilities Practicing Nursing, Oct 16 – AMA Journal of Ethics

The nursing profession can become more inclusive by fostering a supportive culture, resilience, and realistic expectations for people with disabilities. AMA Journal of Ethics is a monthly bioethics journal published by the American Medical Association.

Source: Just and Realistic Expectations for Persons with Disabilities Practicing Nursing, Oct 16 – AMA Journal of Ethics

Patricia M. Davidson, PhD, RN, Cynda Hylton Rushton, PhD, RN, Jennifer Dotzenrod, MPP, Christina A. Godack, MA, Deborah Baker, DNP, CRNP, and Marie N. Nolan, PhD, RN

Abstract

The Americans with Disabilities Act prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability and requires schools to provide reasonable accommodations for persons with disabilities. The profession of nursing is striving for diversity and inclusion, but barriers still exist to realizing accommodations for people with disabilities. Promoting disclosure, a supportive and enabling environment, resilience, and realistic expectations are important considerations if we are to include among our ranks health professionals who can understand, based on similar life experiences of disability, a fuller range of perspectives of the patients we care for.

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Technical Standards and Deaf and Hard of Hearing Medical School Applicants and Students: Interrogating Sensory Capacity and Practice Capacity, Oct 16 – AMA Journal of Ethics

Medical school technical standards should be revised to be more inclusive of applicants with disabilities to diversify the physician workforce. AMA Journal of Ethics is a monthly bioethics journal published by the American Medical Association.

Source: Technical Standards and Deaf and Hard of Hearing Medical School Applicants and Students: Interrogating Sensory Capacity and Practice Capacity, Oct 16 – AMA Journal of Ethics

Michael Argenyi, MD

Abstract

Applicants to medical schools who are deaf and hard of hearing (DHoH) or who have other disabilities face significant barriers to medical school admission. One commonly cited barrier to admission is medical schools’ technical standards (TS) for admission, advancement, and graduation. Ethical values of diversity and equity support altering the technical standards to be more inclusive of people with disabilities. Incorporating these values into admissions, advancement, and graduation considerations for DHoH and other students with disabilities can contribute to the physician workforce being more representative of the diverse patients it serves and better able to care for them.

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Prevalence of Self-Disclosed Disability in US Allopathic Medical Students | Medical Education and Training | JAMA | The JAMA Network

Studying the performance of medical students with disabilities requires a better understanding of the prevalence and categories of disabilities represented.1- 4 It remains unclear how many medical students have disabilities; prior estimates are out-of-date and psychological, learning, and chronic health disabilities have not been evaluated.5 This study assessed the prevalence of all disabilities and the accommodations in use at allopathic medical schools in the United States.

Source: Prevalence of Self-Disclosed Disability in US Allopathic Medical Students | Medical Education and Training | JAMA | The JAMA Network

Empowering medical students with disabilities: The student perspective – Herzer – 2016 – Disability Compliance for Higher Education – Wiley Online Library

Source: Empowering medical students with disabilities: The student perspective – Herzer – 2016 – Disability Compliance for Higher Education – Wiley Online Library

Medical school can be a stressful and high-stakes experience. For medical students with disabilities, that experience may be even more stressful as students navigate the accommodations process, worry about possible discrimination if they disclose their disabilities, and fear being viewed as inferior compared to their peers. Disability services providers play a vital role in supporting students through the medical school experience.

MU medical students’ complaints describe humiliation, discrimination | Higher Education | columbiamissourian.com

MU medical students’ complaints describe humiliation, discrimination

Source: MU medical students’ complaints describe humiliation, discrimination | Higher Education | columbiamissourian.com

COLUMBIA — Matt Darrough didn’t take a traditional path to the MU School of Medicine.

When he applied in November 2013, he was 43 and working full time as a lawyer. He was also preparing to have his legs amputated below the knee and get prosthetics. An accident years earlier had left him paralyzed from the knees down.

Darrough was worried that his age and disability would make medical school more difficult, but in his interview, the chief of surgery said he was exactly the type of student the school was seeking. The admissions committee wanted greater diversity, including students like Darrough with no background in science.

Three years later, Darrough dropped out, frustrated with what he described as constant bullying, a lack of accommodation of his disability and an overall hostile environment.

He filed a complaint — one of 15 filed by students against the medical school in the past two years, according to documents requested by the Missourian in September and obtained Dec. 8 through a Sunshine Law request. Most of the complaints involved public humiliation, and others described experiences of gender discrimination.

The Missourian obtained medical students’ reports of mistreatment from September 2014 to present through a Sunshine Law request. The following are selections of students’ narratives.

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Moving From Disability to Possibility | Humanities | JAMA | The JAMA Network

Source: Moving From Disability to Possibility | Humanities | JAMA | The JAMA Network

When I was in the first grade, an astute teacher noticed that I had trouble seeing the blackboard. This finding was quickly confirmed by a vision test. Formal evaluation by an ophthalmologist revealed that I had a rare degenerative retinal disease. Worse than that diagnosis was the ophthalmologist’s devastating prognosis for my life: attending college would be very challenging, sports and certain activities would be difficult or impossible, and it was unlikely that I would ever have a professional career.

Supporting Student Success through Connecting Activities: An Info Brief Series for Community Colleges | NCWD/Youth

Source: Supporting Student Success through Connecting Activities: An Info Brief Series for Community Colleges | NCWD/Youth

Community college leaders are increasingly concerned with finding ways to better support and engage students in an effort to improve college completion rates. In order to increase their persistence and completion, many students need assistance connecting to services, activities, programs, and supports relevant to their individual needs and goals. Postsecondary institutions can play a significant role in helping students access these services, supports, and opportunities. This series of Info Briefs is designed for community colleges to raise awareness about the significance of connecting students to services and supports such as health insurance, financial assistance, housing, and transportation, and assisting them in navigating these and other services and supports relevant to their individual needs and goals. In addition, these briefs provide practical examples of how some colleges are supporting students and relevant resources for implementing connecting activities at community colleges.

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