Eugene Washington PCORI Engagement Awards

The healthcare research process traditionally includes only scientists and other research-related professionals. PCORI believes that engagement of nontraditional stakeholders—from topic selection through design and conduct of research to dissemination of results—can influence research to be more patient centered, useful, and trustworthy, and ultimately lead to greater use of research results by patients and the broader healthcare community.

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RWJF Health Data for Action

RWJF Health Data for Action – The HD4A program will fund innovative research that uses the available data to answer important research questions. Applicants under this Call for Proposals (CFP) will write a proposal for a research study using data from either the Health Care Cost Institute (HCCI) or athenahealth. Successful applicants will be provided with access to these data, which are described in greater detail below. The HCCI and athenahealth data provide a wealth of private claims data and rich detail on care delivery and patient obesity-related measures, respectively. The proposed studies should enable relevant, innovative, and actionable research that uses the available data to answer important, policy-relevant questions.

NICHD Exploratory/Developmental Research Grant (R21)

The NICHD Exploratory/Developmental Grant program supports exploratory and developmental research projects that fall within the NICHD mission by providing support for the early and conceptual stages of these projects. These studies may involve considerable risk but may lead to a breakthrough in a particular area, or to the development of novel techniques, agents, methodologies, models, or applications that could have a major impact on a field of biomedical, behavioral, or clinical research.

Posted Date

April 20, 2017

Open Date (Earliest Submission Date)

May 16, 2017

Expiration Date

May 8, 2020

Purpose/Research Objectives

The NICHD Exploratory/Developmental Grant program supports exploratory and developmental research projects that fall within the NICHD mission by providing support for the early and conceptual stages of these projects. These studies may involve considerable risk but may lead to a breakthrough in a particular area, or to the development of novel techniques, agents, methodologies, models, or applications that could have a major impact on a field of biomedical, behavioral, or clinical research.

The evolution and vitality of the biomedical, behavioral, and clinical sciences require a constant infusion of new ideas, techniques, and points of view. These may differ substantially from current thinking or practice and may not yet be supported by substantial preliminary data. Through the NICHD Exploratory/Developmental Research Grant Program, the NIH seeks to foster the introduction of novel scientific ideas, model systems, tools, agents, targets, and technologies that have the potential to substantially advance biomedical, behavioral, and clinical research within the NICHD scientific mission.

This program is intended to encourage new exploratory and developmental research projects. For example, such projects could assess the feasibility of a novel area of investigation or a new experimental system that has the potential to enhance health-related research. Another example could include the unique and innovative use of an existing methodology to explore a new scientific area.

Specific Areas of Research Interest

Areas of research covered by the proposed R21 projects must fall within the scientific missions of the twelve Scientific Branches of the NICHD Division of Extramural Research (DER) or the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research (NCMRR).  Details about those scientific missions and program staff contacts may be found on the web pages for the DER scientific branches at: http://www.nichd.nih.gov/about/org/der/branches/Pages/index.aspx and the NCMRR at:  http://www.nichd.nih.gov/about/org/ncmrr/Pages/overview.aspx.  Specific research priorities of DER branches and NCMRR are listed as follows.

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Program to Increase Diversity Across Its Programming

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Program to Increase Diversity Across Its Programming
Deadline: May 16, 2017
Award Ceiling: $50,000
http://rwjf.ws/2ojDzXq
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation has issued a Request for Proposals for an annual initiative to increase diversity across its research network and programming.

Now in its eleventh year, New Connections: Increasing Diversity of RWJF Programming, a career development program for early-career researchers, is designed to expand the diversity of perspectives that inform RWJF programming and introduce new researchers to the foundation to help address research and evaluation needs. Through grantmaking, mentorship, career development and networking, New Connections enhances the research capacity of its grantees and network members. The researchers in the program transcend disciplines (health, health care, social sciences, business, urban planning, architecture and engineering); work to build the case for a Culture of Health with strong qualitative and quantitative research skills; and produce and translate timely research results.

Guidelines: How to Write and Report About People with Disabilities

Guidelines: How to Write and Report About People with Disabilities (Download PDF)

Your Words, Our Image

Writers, editors, reporters and other communicators strive to use the most accurate terminology about people with disabilities. However, inaccurate, archaic and offensive expressions are still commonly used, perpetuating negative stereotypes and beliefs about people with disabilities.

For example, a person who uses a wheelchair – an objective fact – is often described as wheelchair-bound, a subjective description that implies victim hood.

As one wheelchair user puts it, “I personally am not ‘bound’ by my wheelchair. It is a very liberating device that allows me to work, play, maintain a household, connect with family and friends, and ‘have a life.’ ”

Who Says?

Since the first edition was published in 1984, we have consulted with hundreds of disability groups and individuals who have disabilities to produce Guidelines: How to Write and Report About People with Disabilities. The eighth edition presents the latest terminology preferred by people with disabilities.

The Associated Press Stylebook, the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th edition) and the American Association for the Advancement of Science have all adopted some of the recommendations from previous editions of the Guidelines.

The first edition of the Guidelines was produced with funding from the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research. Since then, more than one million copies have been distributed, and the electronic version is now used by people around the world.

Please use the Guidelines when you write or report about people with disabilities. We also offer a poster that presents a short list of disability writing style dos and don’ts.

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