Broad PCORI Funding Announcements – Cycle 1 2018 (for Addressing Disparities, Assessment of Options, Communication and Dissemination Research, Improving Healthcare Systems) | PCORI

Source: Broad PCORI Funding Announcements – Cycle 1 2018 (for Addressing Disparities, Assessment of Options, Communication and Dissemination Research, Improving Healthcare Systems) | PCORI

Letters of Intent are due Tuesday, February 13, 2018, by 5:00 p.m. ET.
Those selected to submit a full application will be notified by Wednesday, March 14, 2018.
Full applications are due Wednesday, May 16, 2018, by 5:00 p.m. ET.

The Broad PCORI Funding Announcements (PFAs) seek investigator-initiated applications for patient-centered comparative clinical effectiveness research (CER) projects aligned with our priority areas for research. This PFA covers the following four priority areas: Addressing Disparities; Assessment of Prevention, Diagnosis, and Treatment Options; Assessment of Prevention, Diagnosis, and Treatment Options; Communication and Dissemination Research; and Improving Healthcare Systems. We are looking for your best ideas to address needs of patients, caregivers, clinicians, and other healthcare stakeholders in making personalized clinical decisions across a wide range of conditions, populations, and treatments.

These broad areas encompass the patient-centered comparative clinical effectiveness research we support. As our work progresses and we engage with a broad range of patients, caregivers, clinicians, and other healthcare stakeholders, we may develop additional national priorities for research.

Our National Priorities for Research and Research Agenda is a framework to guide our funding of comparative clinical effectiveness research that will give patients and those who care for them the ability to make better-informed health decisions. The framework was developed by workgroups of our Board of Governors, members of our Methodology Committee, and staff. It was revised in response to public comments and accepted by the Board on May 21, 2012.

Deborah Munroe Noonan Memorial Research Fund – Health Resource in Action

Source: Deborah Munroe Noonan Memorial Research Fund – Health Resource in Action

The Deborah Munroe Noonan Memorial Research Fund, established in 1947 by Frank M. Noonan in memory of his mother, continues its proud tradition of supporting improvements in the quality of life for children with disabilities with one-year grants up to $80,000 (inclusive of 20% indirect costs). Recognizing that children’s health services and supports are provided in a wide range of community settings as well as hospitals, the Noonan Research program welcomes research proposals from both nonprofit organizations and academic institutions that serve children with physical or developmental disabilities and associated health-related complications. Eligible organizations and target populations must be within the Fund’s geographic area of interest of Greater Boston. Neither a faculty position nor an advanced degree is required.

The Sara Elizabeth O’Brien Trust, Bank of America, N.A., Trustee, will support up to one additional project submitted to the Noonan Research Fund focusing on medical research related to blindness in children and adolescents.  Please note, the O’Brien Trust does not fund work on other visual impairments, e.g., strabismus. The O’Brien Trust is not restricted to the Noonan geography specified by the Noonan Research program.

Proposals for basic science research will not be considered (except for proposals focused on blindness funded by the O’Brien Trust), nor will applications for capital costs such as buildings, renovations, or major equipment items. The Noonan Fund does not support direct service, primary prevention projects, or primary medical conditions such as obesity or device development. Drug trials are not supported by the Noonan Research Fund.

The Peter and Elizabeth C. Tower Foundation | Intellectual Disabilities

To be eligible for funding, organizations must be located in or primarily serve residents in one of the following geographic areas:
Barnstable, Dukes, Essex, and Nantucket Counties of Massachusetts; Erie and Niagara Counties of New York.

Source: The Peter and Elizabeth C. Tower Foundation | Intellectual Disabilities

The Tower Foundation will now offer three opportunities per year to apply for funding for its Core Programs and Services grants (in Intellectual DisabilitiesLearning DisabilitiesMental Health, and Substance Use Disorders) as well as for Technology and Small Grants. This change from an annual cycle will ensure a shorter process that will help to lessen the administrative burden on grantees.  Learn more here.

For our Intellectual Disabilities category, we have identified four key goals:

  1. Children with intellectual disabilities are identified early and receive services that meet their evolving needs.
  2. Young people with intellectual disabilities are engaged in meaningful, social, vocational, and educational pursuits.
  3. Families understand intellectual disabilities and secure needed supports.
  4. Communities embrace persons with intellectual disabilities and provide them with a full range of supports and opportunities to engage in community life.

Preferred Strategies

While open to creative approaches, some preferred strategies for supporting our goals include:

  • Screening and Assessment
  • Community-Based Education and Supports
    – Community and Professional Education
    – Family Supports
  • Transition/Service Navigation

For More Information

If you are interested in submitting a grant application, please see our 2017 Core Programs and Services Guidelines.  Subscribe to our mailing list to be notified when guidelines are posted.

What is a “Person Month” & How Do I Calculate It? | NIH Extramural Nexus

A “person month” is the metric for expressing the effort (amount of time) principal investigators (PIs), faculty and other senior personnel devote to a specific project. The effort is based on the type of appointment of the individual with the organization; e.g., calendar year (CY), academic year (AY), and/or summer term (SM); and the organization’s definition of such. For instance, some institutions define the academic year as a 9-month appointment while others define it as a 10-month appointment.

Source: What is a “Person Month” & How Do I Calculate It? | NIH Extramural Nexus

Conversion of percentage of effort to person months is straight-forward. To calculate person months, multiply the percentage of your effort associated with the project times the number of months of your appointment. For example:

25% of a 9 month academic year appointment equals 2.25 (AY) person months (9 x 0.25= 2.25)

10% of a 12 month calendar appointment equals 1.2 (CY) person months (12 x 0.10 = 1.2)

35% of a 3 month summer term appointment equals 1.05 (SM) person months (3 x 0.35= 1.05)

10% of a 0.5 FTE 12 month appointment equals 0.6 (CY) person months (12 x .5 X .1 = 0.6)
Another example:

If the regular pay schedule of an institution is a 9 month academic year and the PI will devote 9 months at 30% time/effort and 3 months summer term at 30% time/effort to the project, then 2.7 academic months and .9 summer months should be listed in the academic and summer term blocks of the application (9 x 30% = 2.7 person months; 3 x 30%= .9)

An Excel-based Percent of Time & Effort to Person Months Calculator is available on grants.nih.gov.

Have additional questions related to NIH’s usage of “person months”? Visit our page of frequently asked questions (FAQs) on this topic.

Grants | Refugee Health Promotion

Source: Grants | Administration for Children and Families

Summary

Funding Oppportunity Title: Refugee Health Promotion
Funding Opportunity Number: HHS-2017-ACF-ORR-RX-1222
Program Office: Office of Refugee Resettlement
Funding Type: Discretionary
Funding Instrument Type: Grant
Announcement Type: Initial
CFDA: 93.576
Post Date: 03/14/2017
Application Due Date: 05/15/2017

Description

The Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR) within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) invites States to submit applications for Refugee Health Promotion (RHP) discretionary grant funds.  The purpose of the RHP grant is to support health and emotional wellness among refugees.  The program is designed to coordinate and promote local health and mental health services and education.  The funding should enhance access to health care services.  The RHP grant is intended to encourage partnerships with community-based organizations and complement existing care coordination and medical assistance programs such as Medicaid and Refugee Medical Assistance (RMA), which includes Refugee Medical Screening (RMS), and other ORR-funded social service programs, including Preferred Communities.

Kessler Foundation Signature Employment Grants

Kessler Foundation

Signature Employment Grants yearly to support  non-traditional solutions  that increase employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities.

Our success is in stimulating ideas from the field that spark new models that are adaptable to replication and scalability, and may be models for policy change. Kessler Foundation’s flexible funding dollars encourage organizations to pursue promising approaches and concepts beyond what they might have done without our support.

What We Fund  Signature Employment Grants are awarded nationally to fund new pilot initiatives, demonstration projects, or social ventures that lead to the generation of new ideas to solve the high unemployment and underemployment of individuals with disabilities. Preference is given for interventions that overcome specific employment barriers related to long-term dependence on public assistance or advance competitive employment in a cost-effective manner.

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Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects (DRRP) Program: Center on Knowledge Translation for Disability and Rehabilitation Research

Deadline: May 9, 2017
Award Ceiling: $750,000
DRRP: Knowledge Translation

The purpose of NIDILRR’s Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects (DRRP) which are funded through the Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program, is to plan and conduct research, demonstration projects, training, and related activities, including international activities, to develop methods, procedures, and rehabilitation technology that maximize the full inclusion and integration into society, employment, independent living, family support, and economic and social self-sufficiency of individuals with disabilities, especially individuals with the most severe disabilities, and to improve the effectiveness of services authorized under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended (Rehabilitation Act). Under this particular DRRP priority, applicants must propose activities aimed to 1) add new knowledge in the area of knowledge translation, 2) promote the use of NIDILRR-funded work that is relevant to the needs of intended audiences; and 3) support the knowledge translation endeavors of NIDILRR grantees and other NIDILRR-funded knowledge translation centers.

 

Resubmissions Revisited: Funded Resubmission Applications and Their Initial Peer Review Scores

“My first submission got an overall impact score of 30. Is that good enough? What’s the likelihood I’ll eventually get this funded?”, or, “My first submission was not even discussed. Now what? Does anyone with an undiscussed grant bother to resubmit? And what’s the likelihood I’ll eventually get this funded?” In a past blog we provided some general advice and data to help you consider these types of questions, and obviously the answers depend on specifics — but even so, based on your feedback and comments

Source: Resubmissions Revisited: Funded Resubmission Applications and Their Initial Peer Review Scores | NIH Extramural Nexus

In a past blog we provided some general advice and data to help you consider these types of questions, and obviously the answers depend on specifics — but even so, based on your feedback and comments we thought it would be informative to offer high-level descriptive data on resubmission and award rates according to the first-time score, that is, the overall impact score on the A0 submission.

Here we describe the outcomes of 83,722 unsolicited A0 R01 applications submitted in fiscal years 2012 through 2016. Of these, 69,714 (or 83%) were “Type 1” (de novo) applications, while 14,008 (or 17%) were “Type 2” (or competing renewal) applications.

Let’s begin with looking at award rates: as a reminder, award rates are the total number of awards divided by the total number of applications. Figure 1 shows the award rate of these A0 applications broken out by type 1 (de novo) vs type 2 (competing renewals). (If you’re interested in looking at new and competing renewals in aggregate, for this and the following figures, these are shown in the Excel file we’ve posted to the RePORT website.)

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Translational Research to Help Older Adults Maintain Their Health and Independence in the Community (R21)

This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites applications using the R21 award mechanism for translational research that moves evidence-based research findings toward the development of new interventions, programs,policies, practices, and tools that can be used by organizations in the community to help older adults remain healthy and independent, productively engaged, and living in their own homes and communities. The goal of this FOA is to support translational research involving collaborations between academic research centers and community-based organizations with expertise serving or engaging older adults (such as city and state health departments, city/town leadership councils, educational institutions, workplaces, Area Agencies on Aging, and organizations funded or assisted by the Corporation for National and Community Service) that will enhance our understanding of practical tools, techniques, programs and policies that communities across the nation can use to more effectively respond to needs of the aging population.
Standard Dates – Expiration Date May 8, 2017
Direct costs are limited to $275,000 over an R21 two-year period, with no more than $200,000 in direct costs allowed in any single year.

Policies for Action: Policy and Law Research to Build a Culture of Health

2017 Call for Proposals

Purpose

Policies for Action: Policy and Law Research to Build a Culture of Health (P4A) was created to help build the evidence base for policies that can help build a Culture of Health. P4A seeks to engage long-standing health care, mental and behavioral health, and public health researchers, as well as experts in areas that we recognize have strong influence on health, well-being and equity—such as labor, criminal justice, education, transportation, housing, and the built environment.The research funded under this call for proposals (CFP) should help fill significant gaps in our knowledge about what policies can serve as positive drivers of change, including how the social determinants of health can be used to achieve improvements in population health, well-being, and equity. Additional information on this program can be found at policiesforaction.org.

Key Dates

February 15, 2017 (1 p.m. ET)
Optional applicant Web conference call. Registration is requiredMarch 10, 2017 (3 p.m. ET)
Deadline for receipt of brief proposals.Early May 2017
Notification to brief proposal applicants, including invitations to submit full proposals.

June 16, 2017 (3 p.m. ET)
Deadline for receipt of invited full proposals.

Early to mid-August 2017
Notification to full proposal applicants, including invitations to finalists to proceed with grant initiations.

October 1, 2017
Grants initiated.