Small Steps, Big Leaps: Healthy Vending in Your Organization

2017/04/06
2:00 to 3:00 pm CST

This presentation provides strategies for healthier vending options through the following: (i) steps to developing healthy vending machine initiative; (ii) using tools to survey vending machines and implementing new guidelines; and, (iii) integrating examples and links to resources related to healthy vending machine for your initiative.

Audience: Providers who provide Supports for Community Living services to people with IDD and others seeking to increase healthy options in their organization’s vending machines.

Presenters: Jasmina Sisirak, PhD, MPH and Kristin Krok, CTRS

Vending PowerPoint Presentation

Transcript “Small Steps BIG LEAPS” Presentation 4-6-17

View Presentation

Handouts

  1. Healthy Vending Guidelines
  2. Healthy Vending
  3. Vending Machine Inventory Tool
  4. Vending Policy Example

Citation: Sisirak, J. & Krok, K. (2017). Small Steps, Big Leaps: Healthy Vending in Your Organization. HealthMatters Community of Practice Webinar Series. RRTCDD: Chicago, IL.

Affordable Care Act Toolkit for Self-Advocates

The Affordable Care Act Toolkit for Self-Advocates was put together by the Autism Self Advocacy Network ( ASAN) to “equip self-advocates to participate in important conversations about our lives and the services we rely on.”

Affordable Care Act Toolkit for Self-Advocates

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) made it easier to get health insurance for all Americans, including people with disabilities. But a lot of the information out there about the ACA and attempts to repeal it can be difficult to understand and navigate. That’s why the Autistic Self Advocacy Network (ASAN) released a plain language Affordable Care Act Toolkit for Self-Advocates, part of which was funded by the Special Hope Foundation.

HealthMatters for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: Building Communities of Practice for Health

HealthMatters for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: Building Communities of Practice for Health

A Research to Policy Brief from AUCD and UIC’s RRTCDD (November 14, 2016)

Abstract

The emergence of accessible health promotion initiatives for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) over the past 20 years demonstrates great promise for improving their health status. However, people with IDD continue to experience numerous age-related health issues and often lack control over environments and practices that impact their health. Just as in the general U.S. population, a great challenge remains to lower obesity levels, increase physical activity, and improve diets among people with IDD.  While research evidence for successful population specific health promotion programs and training, such as the 12-Week HealthMatters Program has been documented, an urgent need exists for widespread translation of evidence-based programs into practice and policy implementation. The next step is to develop and test models to support changes in state and community based organizations’ (CBOs) policies and fiscal budgets that embed and sustain evidence-based health promotion programs in the communities where people with IDD live, work, and play. Determining successful scale-up processes of “what works” is critical in being able to achieve the goal of improved lives for the greatest number of people.

Jasmina Sisirak and Beth Marks University of Illinois at Chicago
Lindsey Mullis and Kathy Sheppard-Jones University of Kentucky
LynnAnn Tew University of Alaska Anchorage
Kristin Krok and Dina Donohue-Chase NorthPointe Resources
George S. Gotto and Christy Miller University of Missouri Kansas City
Amanda George eitas – Developmental Disability Services of Jackson County
Jessica Minor and Christine Grosso Association of University Centers on Disabilities

The impact of support services teams: Community-based behavioral health support interventions

Owen, R., Bowers, A., Heller, T., Hsieh, K. and Gould, R. (2016).  The impact of support services teams: Community-based behavioral health support interventions. Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities. doi:10.1111/jppi.12186.

Abstract

Background: Community capacity to serve people with intellectual/developmental disabilities (IDD) and behavioral health challenges is often limited. Using interdisciplinary teams to work with stakeholders, including people with IDD, their families, providers, and agencies may help increase this capacity. One example in the United States is the Support Services Teams (SST) program of a midwestern state. Specific Aims: This research aimed to identify changes before to after referral to SST in the proportion of people who used and the total number of admissions/visits, and prescriptions; and the Medicaid liability associated with emergency room (ER), hospital, and pharmacy services for SST participants. Second, the research described the SST participants and services provided. Method: The authors used Wilcoxon and McNemar’s tests to compare hospital, ER, and pharmacy outcome measures for 109 people who were referred to SST and had 12 months of data before and after referral. Separate analyses were also conducted for the 88 people who remained in the community after referral and the 21 people who had short institutional stays. Findings: For the full population of SST participants, the proportion of people with a hospital admission, the total number of hospital admissions, and Medicaid liability for hospitalizations significantly decreased from before to after referral to SST. Medicaid liability for prescriptions significantly decreased for people with an institutional stay. Changes in the other outcomes trended downwards, although not significantly. Discussion: This study shows that the use of interdisciplinary teams for people with IDD and behavioral health challenges can be effective in reducing the use of services. These teams can help to build community capacity to work with these individuals and avoid more costly ER and hospital services and reduce the number of medications prescribed.

Health services appraisal and the transition to Medicaid Managed Care from fee for service

Owen, R., Heller, T. & Bowers, A. (2016).  Health services appraisal and the transition to Medicaid Managed Care from fee for service.  Disability and Health, 9(2), 239-247. doi:10.1016/j.dhjo.2015.10.004
 
Abstract:
Background: Many states are transitioning fee-for-service (FFS) Medicaid into Medicaid   Managed Care (MMC) for people with disabilities.
Objective: This study examined managed care’s impact on health services appraisal (HSA) and unmet medical needs of individuals with disabilities receiving Medicaid. Key questions included 1) Do participant demographics and enrollment in MMC impact unmet medical needs and HSA? 2) Within MMC, do demographics and continuity of care relate to unmet medical needs?
3) Within MMC, do demographics, unmet medical needs and continuity of care relate to HSA?
Methods: We collected cross-sectional survey data (n 5 1615) from people with disabilities in MMC operated by for-profit insurance companies (n 5 849) and a similar group remaining in FFS (n 5 766) in one state. Regression analyses were conducted across these groups and within MMC only.
Results: Across Medicaid groups, MMC enrollment was not related to either HSA or unmet needs; health status, having a mental health disability and unmet transportation needs related to HSA and health status, unmet transportation needs and having a mental health or physical disability related to higher unmet medical needs. Within MMC, in addition to better health and fewer unmet medical needs, less continuity of care significantly decreased HSA. Higher unmet transportation needs, poorer health status, having a physical or mental health disability, and less continuity of care significantly decreased unmet medical needs.
Conclusions: This research points to the importance of meeting unmet needs of individuals in MMC and the need for increased continuity of care as people transition from FFS.

National Goals Conference: Self-Determination and Self-Advocacy Strand

National Goals in Research, Practice and Policy for and with People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities


Setting a National Agenda for Self-Determination and Self-Advocacy Research, Practice, and Policy

In August 2015, a National Goals in Research, Policy, and Practice working meeting was held in Washington, DC to summarize the current state of knowledge and identify a platform of national goals, organized by 10 focus areas, in research, practice, and policy in intellectual and developmental disabilities. The products were developed in each strand for a variety of audiences with the overarching goal of advancing a research agenda that will influence policy and practice for and with people with intellectual and developmental disabilities over the next 10 years.

View Self-Determination and Self-Advocacy Issue Brief, AAIDD Inclusion Journal Article, and Video

National Goals Conference: Long Term Supports and Services Strand

National Goals in Research, Practice and Policy for and with People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities


Setting a National Agenda for Long Term Supports and Services Research, Practice, and Policy

In August 2015, a National Goals in Research, Policy, and Practice working meeting was held in Washington, DC to summarize the current state of knowledge and identify a platform of national goals, organized by 10 focus areas, in research, practice, and policy in intellectual and developmental disabilities. The products were developed in each strand for a variety of audiences with the overarching goal of advancing a research agenda that will influence policy and practice for and with people with intellectual and developmental disabilities over the next 10 years.

View Long Term Supports and Services Issue Brief, AAIDD Inclusion Journal Article, and Video

National Goals Conference: Health and Wellness Strand

National Goals in Research, Practice and Policy for and with People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities


Setting a National Agenda for Health and Wellness Research, Practice, and Policy

In August 2015, a National Goals in Research, Policy, and Practice working meeting was held in Washington, DC to summarize the current state of knowledge and identify a platform of national goals, organized by 10 focus areas, in research, practice, and policy in intellectual and developmental disabilities. The products were developed in each strand for a variety of audiences with the overarching goal of advancing a research agenda that will influence policy and practice for and with people with intellectual and developmental disabilities over the next 10 years.

View Health and Wellness Issue Brief, AAIDD Inclusion Journal Article, and Video

National Goals Conference: Families Strand

National Goals in Research, Practice and Policy for and with People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities


Setting a National Agenda for Family Research, Practice, and Policy

In August 2015, a National Goals in Research, Policy, and Practice working meeting was held in Washington, DC to summarize the current state of knowledge and identify a platform of national goals, organized by 10 focus areas, in research, practice, and policy in intellectual and developmental disabilities. The products were developed in each strand for a variety of audiences with the overarching goal of advancing a research agenda that will influence policy and practice for and with people with intellectual and developmental disabilities over the next 10 years.

View Families Issue Brief, AAIDD Inclusion Journal Article, and Video