Low Levels of Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(12), 1503; doi:10.3390/ijerph14121503

Kelly Hsieh 1,* , Thessa I. M. Hilgenkamp 2, Sumithra Murthy 1, Tamar Heller 1 and James H. Rimmer 3
1 Department of Disability and Human Development, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60609, USA
2 Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612, USA
3 School of Health Professions, University of Alabama at Birmingham, SHPB 331, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA

The paper has been published online: http://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/14/12/1503

Abstract
Adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) are more likely to lead sedentary lifestyles and have low levels of physical activity (LLPA). The present study investigated the prevalence of reported LLPA and time spent watching TV in adults with ID and identified the associated factors for these behaviors. The proxy informants of 1618 adults with ID completed the surveys regarding their health behaviors. Multiple logistic regressions were employed for LLPA and multiple linear regressions for time spent watching TV. About 60% of adults with ID had LLPA and average time spent watching TV was 3.4 h a day. Some characteristics and health and function variables were identified as associated factors. While engaging in community activities and involvement in Special Olympics were inversely associated with LLPA, they were not associated with time spent watching TV. Attending day/educational programs or being employed were associated with spending less time watching TV. Findings highlight differential factors associated with LLPA versus TV-watching behavior in adults with ID. Hence, a key strategy aimed at increasing physical activity includes promoting participation in social and community activities, while targeted activities for reducing sedentary behavior might focus on providing day programs or employment opportunities for adults with ID.

Factors associated with meeting physical activity guidelines by adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities

Adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities may face challenges to staying physically active. Rate for adults with IDD meeting PA guidelines (13.5%) was less than half that of the general population (30.8%).

Source: Factors associated with meeting physical activity guidelines by adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities

Abstract

Background

Many individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) have sedentary lifestyles.

Aims

(a) compare adults with IDD with the general adult population on adherence to U.S. physical activity (PA) guidelines, and (b) determine what factors predict adherence to PA guidelines by adults with IDD.

Methods

We compared adults with IDD from the 2011–2012 National Core Indicators Adult Consumer Survey (NCI-ACS) with the general U.S. population on meeting PA guidelines. We examined the association of demographic, diagnostic, mobility, health and community participation variables with meeting PA guidelines by adults with IDD.

Results

The rate for adults with IDD meeting PA guidelines (13.5%) was less than half that of the general population (30.8%). Among adults with IDD, at-risk groups included those with more severe disability, Down syndrome, mobility impairments, obesity, poor health, mental illness, no independent access to community exercise, and less frequent participation in community exercise. Going out for exercise was the only form of community participation associated with meeting PA guidelines. People who accessed the community for exercise independently (i.e., alone) were more likely to meet PA guidelines.

Conclusions

Interventions aimed at increasing PA for people with IDD should consider these factors in their design.

National Physical Fitness & Sports Month – May 2017

It’s National Physical Fitness & Sports Month! The President’s Council on Fitness, Sports & Nutrition is excited to keep the journey from #0to60 going by encouraging everyone to #MoveInMay. This May, stay motivated with the President’s Council’s Presidential Champions and Presidential Active Lifestyle Award (PALA+) programs! Each program allows you to track your daily physical activity and earn awards. There are countless ways to get moving and we are asking our partners to help us inspire all Americans t

Source: National Physical Fitness & Sports Month – May 2017 | HHS.gov

It’s National Physical Fitness & Sports Month! The President’s Council on Fitness, Sports & Nutrition is excited to keep the journey from #0to60 going by encouraging everyone to #MoveInMay.

This May, stay motivated with the President’s Council’s Presidential Champions and Presidential Active Lifestyle Award (PALA+) programs! Each program allows you to track your daily physical activity and earn awards.

There are countless ways to get moving and we are asking our partners to help us inspire all Americans to be active. We’ve created this #MoveInMay Playbook where you can find themes, tips and motivational messages that you can promote throughout the month. You can also get ideas to #MoveInMay and every day at 0to60fitness.org !

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Physical Activity: Family-Based Interventions

Source: Physical Activity: Family-Based Interventions

Summary of Task Force Finding

The Community Preventive Services Task Force recommends family-based interventions to increase physical activity among children.

Intervention

Family-based interventions combine activities to build family support with health education to increase physical activity among children. Interventions include one or more of the following:

  • Goal-setting tools and skills to monitor progress, such as a website to enter information
  • Reinforcement of positive health behaviors, such as reward charts or role modeling of physical activity by parents or instructors
  • Organized physical activity sessions, such as instructor-led opportunities for active games

Interventions also may provide information about other lifestyle behaviors such as choosing healthier foods or reducing screen time.

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Task Force Finding and Rationale Statement

Read the full Task Force Finding and Rationale Statement pdf icon [PDF – 633 kB] for details including implementation issues, possible added benefits, potential harms, and evidence gaps.