Health, United States, 2016

Source: CDC.gov

Download Health, United States, 2016: Chartbook on Longterm Trends in Health

Health, United States, 2016 is the 40th report on the health status of the nation and is submitted by the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services to the President and the Congress of the United States in compliance with Section 308 of the Public Health Service Act. This report was compiled by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

The Health, United States series presents an annual overview of national trends in health statistics. The report contains a Chartbook that assesses the nation’s health by presenting trends and current information on selected measures of morbidity, mortality, health care utilization and access, health risk factors, prevention, health insurance, and personal health care expenditures. This year’s Chartbook focuses on long-term trends in health. The report also contains 114 Trend Tables organized around four major subject areas: health status and determinants, health care utilization, health care resources, and health care expenditures. A companion report—Health, United States: In Brief—features information extracted from the full report. The complete report and related data products are available on the Health, United States website at: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/hus.htm.

Preparing for Life After High School: Characteristics and Experiences of Youth in Special Education

Findings from the National Longitudinal Transition Study 2012. Volume 1: Comparisons with Other Youth (Full Report)

Key Findings: Youth with an IEP are more likely than their peers to be socioeconomically disadvantaged and to face problems with health, communication, and completing typical tasks independently. The vast majority of youth with and without an IEP feel positive about school, but those with an IEP experience bullying and are suspended at higher rates, and are less engaged in school and social activities. Youth with an IEP are more likely than youth without an IEP to struggle academically, yet less likely to

Source: Preparing for Life After High School: The Characteristics and Experiences of Youth in Special Education. Findings from the National Longitudinal Transition Study 2012. Volume 1: Comparisons with Other Youth (Full Report)

Policymakers and educators have long recognized the importance of addressing the needs of youth in special education, who today account for 12 percent of all youth in the United States. Concern that this objective was not being adequately met led Congress to pass landmark legislation in 1975, now known as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) (U.S. Department of Education, 2010). IDEA mandates that children and youth with disabilities have access to a free appropriate public education.

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Data-Driven, Cross-Sector, and Community-Led Transformation: Place-based Population Health

Toward Data-Driven, Cross-Sector, and Community-Led Transformation: Academy Health provides an overview of the findings including the who, the what and the how.
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The Community Health Peer Learning Program (CHP), a partnership of AcademyHealth and the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC), conducted an environmental scan of multisector initiatives driving toward population health improvement at the community level, many with a focus on capturing, sharing, integrating, and using data to support their work. The scan and ensuing report confirm the emergence and rapid expansion of such efforts, and reflect a growing recognition that local conditions often drive the environmental and social determinants of health. Many place-based population health improvement efforts, therefore, involve sectors outside of health care (e.g., housing, education, criminal justice), and this report profiles several different programs and strategies designed to build and sustain these cross-sector collaborations. The report also conveys the scale, scope, and diversity of ongoing efforts, and offers insights into common challenges, emerging strategies, and promising practices to accelerate progress.Ultimately, the scan and associated report reveal the emergence of a movement—a convergence of programs and people connecting across traditional and non-traditional boundaries, and working together to improve community health.

Download the Executive Summary above, or click here for the full report.

Source: Toward Data-Driven, Cross-Sector, and Community-Led Transformation: Executive Summary | Academy Health

New Issue Brief Available: Opportunities to Improve Nutrition for Older Adults and Reduce Risk of Poor Health Outcomes


http://bit.ly/2mJpAdx

http://nutritionandaging.org/

A new Issue Brief is now available that addresses opportunities to improve nutrition for older adults and also reduce the risk of poor health outcomes. During National Nutrition Month we focus time on the issue of nutrition, because as people age, they may experience malnutrition.  Appetite and the body’s ability to process food may decrease with age, while health conditions and use of medications that can affect nutrition status may increase.  In addition, limited ability to shop for and prepare food can affect a person’s access to it.  Factors like isolation and depression also can affect nutrition.

nTIDE February 2017 Jobs Report: Americans with Disabilities Continue to Contribute to Job Gains

nTIDE February 2017 Jobs Report: Americans with Disabilities Continue to Contribute to Job Gains

Source: nTIDE February 2017 Jobs Report: Americans with Disabilities Continue to Contribute to Job Gains

by Anna Brennan-Curry | Mar 10, 2017

Kessler Foundation and University of New Hampshire release nTIDE Report – Monthly Update

Durham, NH – Employment continues to increase for Americans with disabilities, building on the solid start to the new year, according to today’s National Trends in Disability Employment – Monthly Update (nTIDE), issued by Kessler Foundation and University of New Hampshire’s Institute on Disability (UNH-IOD). Achieving positive employment outcomes is especially challenging for high schools that serve young adults with moderate to severe disabilities. Promising approaches are based on intervening early, coordinating educational and vocational resources, and cultivating local employers.

nTIDE: Comparison of People with and without Disabilities (February 2016 & 2017)

The February numbers indicate that people with and without disabilities are contributing to U.S. job gains. In the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) Jobs Report released Friday, March 10, the employment-to-population ratio for working-age people with disabilities increased from 26.0 percent in February 2016 to 28.1 percent in February 2017 (up 8.1 percent; 2.1 percentage points). For working-age people without disabilities, the employment-to-population ratio increased slightly from 72.3 percent in February 2016 to 72.8 percent in February 2017 (up 0.7 percent; 0.5 percentage points). The employment-to-population ratio, a key indicator, reflects the percentage of people who are working relative to the total population (the number of people working divided by the number of people in the total population multiplied by 100).

“The improvement in the proportion of people with disabilities working continues for the eleventh consecutive month,” according to John O’Neill, PhD, director of employment and disability research at Kessler Foundation. “This is the longest run of positive news since we began reporting the employment situation of people with disabilities in 2013,” he added.

The labor force participation rate for working-age people with disabilities increased from 30.2 percent in February 2016 to 31.5 percent in February 2017 (up 4.3 percent; 1.3 percentage points). For working-age people without disabilities, the labor force participation rate increased slightly from 76.1 percent in February 2016 to 76.4 percent in February 2017 (up 0.4 percent; 0.3 percentage points). The labor force participation rate is the percentage of the population that is working or actively looking for work.

“The trend in the employment of people with disabilities keeps marching upwards; of course there is still quite a ways to go,” said Andrew Houtenville, PhD, associate professor of economics at UNH.

Students with disabilities often struggle after graduating from the supportive environment of special services high schools, and are unprepared to transition into the work force. Bridge to Employment, a promising new pilot program funded by Kessler Foundation, is an example of the efforts to ease this transition for students in New Jersey who attend the Atlantic County Special Services School District (ACSSSD).

JEVS Human Services created the program to address the employment needs of the hardest to serve students. Taking a sophisticated approach, the program begins with a holistic assessment of the values, interests, personalities, and aptitudes of the students, in order to find work placements that are a good fit and provide possibilities for the students to develop—thus improving retention and reducing the long-term burden on the workforce development system. The program also connects students early on with the New Jersey Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (DVRS), a program collaborator, so there’s no gap in services for the students. Another key element to the program is the addition of a dedicated professional called a career navigator to help place students, in part by developing visual resumes using PowerPoint format, an engaging format for presenting their individual skills, interests, and strengths.

“We look forward to seeing how well the program fills the vital need for supports and services for high school students transitioning to the workplace,” said Elaine E. Katz, MS, CCC-SLP, senior VP of grants and communications at Kessler Foundation. “If Bridge to Employment succeeds in transitioning the ACSSSD students who are hardest to serve, this program could serve as a model for effective transition programs in other counties in New Jersey as well.”

In February 2017, among workers ages 16-64, the 4,409,000 workers with disabilities represented 3.1 percent of the total 142,437,000 workers in the U.S.

The next nTIDE will be issued on Friday, April 7, 2017. Follow the news on Twitter #nTIDE.

Join our nTIDE Lunch & Learn series, starting today, March 10 at 12:00pm EST. This live broadcast, hosted via Zoom Webinar, will offer attendees Q&A on the latest nTIDE findings, provide news and updates from the field, as well as host-invited panelists to discuss current disability-related findings and events. Rita Landgraf, Professor of Practice and Distinguished Health and Social Services Administrator in Residence, University of Delaware, College of Health Sciences, joins Drs. Houtenville and O’Neill, Michael Murray of Office of Diversity and Inclusion at the U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM), and Denise Rozell, Policy Strategist at the Association of University Centers on Disabilities (AUCD), to discuss today’s findings as well as the positive return on advancing employment of individuals with disabilities. You can join live, or watch the recordings at: www.ResearchonDisability.org/nTIDE.  Find updates on Twitter #nTIDELearn.

NOTE: The statistics in the National Trends in Disability Employment Update are based on Bureau of Labor Statistics numbers, but are NOT identical. They’ve been customized by the University of New Hampshire to efficiently combine the statistics for men and women of working age (16 to 64). NTIDE is funded, in part, by grants from the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR) (9ORT5022-02-00 & 90RT5017) and Kessler Foundation.

About Kessler Foundation

Kessler Foundation, a major nonprofit organization in the field of disability, is a global leader in rehabilitation research that seeks to improve cognition, mobility, and long-term outcomes – including employment – for people with neurological disabilities caused by diseases and injuries of the brain and spinal cord. Kessler Foundation leads the nation in funding innovative programs that expand opportunities for employment for people with disabilities. For more information, visit www.KesslerFoundation.org.

About the Institute on Disability at the University of New Hampshire

The Institute on Disability (IOD) at the University of New Hampshire (UNH) was established in 1987 to provide a coherent university-based focus for the improvement of knowledge, policies, and practices related to the lives of persons with disabilities and their families. For information on the NIDILRR-funded Employment Policy and Measurement Rehabilitation Research and Training Center, visit www.ResearchonDisability.org.

For more information, or to interview an expert, contact:

Carolann Murphy, 973.324.8382, CMurphy@KesslerFoundation.org

Health and Wellness Strand: Recommendations From National Goals Conference 2015

Sisirak, J. & Marks, B. (2015). Health and Wellness Strand: Recommendations From National Goals Conference 2015. Inclusion, 3(4), 242-249, http://aaiddjournals.org/doi/abs/10.1352/2326-6988-3.4.242.

Although a variety of health and wellness initiatives have emerged in the past decade, people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD), their caregivers, and advocates still are facing remarkable challenges in staying healthy and receiving appropriate health services. The National Goals 2015 Conference provided a unique platform and an opportunity to summarize the current state of knowledge, identify national goals in research, practice, and policy, and set the stage for the future directions in health and wellness in IDD field. This article presents an outline to improve the health of people with IDD. The goals identify major health and wellness issues and solutions proposed by a group of disability researchers, policy specialists, advocates, health care providers, and service providers with the aim to set forth an agenda for national, state, and local action to improve the health of people with IDD and include them fully in appropriate health systems.

 

Technical Standards for Nursing Education Programs in the 21st Century.

Ailey, S. H. & Marks, B. (2016). Technical Standards for Nursing Education Programs in the 21st Century. Rehabilitation Nursing. doi: 10.1002/rnj.278

Abstract

Purpose  The Institute of Medicine (IOM, 2000; 2002) exposed serious safety problems in the health system and called for total qualitative system change. The IOM (2011; 2015) also calls for improving the education of nurses to provide leadership for a redesigned health system. Intertwined with improving education is the need to recruit and retain diverse highly qualified students. Disability is part of diversity inclusion, but current technical standards (nonacademic requirements) for admission to many nursing programs are a barrier to the entry of persons with disabilities. Rehabilitation nurse leaders are in a unique position to improve disability diversity in nursing. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the importance of disability diversity in nursing.

Design  The history of existing technical standards used in many nursing programs is reviewed along with examples.

Methods  Based on the concept that disability inclusion is a part of diversity inclusion, we propose a new model of technical standards for nursing education.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance  Rehabilitation nurse leaders can lead in eliminating barriers to persons with disabilities entering nursing.

Siblings of disabled peoples’ attitudes toward prenatal genetic testing and disability: A mixed methods approach

Carli Friedman, Aleksa L Owen
Siblings of disabled peoples’ attitudes toward prenatal genetic testing and disability: A mixed methods approach.
Disability Studies Quarterly, 36(3).
Abstract
We used the phenomenon of prenatal genetic testing to learn more about how siblings of disabled people understand prenatal genetic testing and social meanings of disability. By interweaving data on siblings’ conscious and unconscious disability attitudes and prenatal testing with siblings’ explanations of their views of prenatal testing we explored siblings’ unique relationships with disability, a particular set of perspectives on prenatal genetic testing, and examined how siblings’ decision-making processes reveal their attitudes about disability more generally. In doing so we found siblings have both personal and broad stakes regarding their experiences with disability that impact their views.
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18061/dsq.v36i3.5051

Racial and Ethnic Disparities among Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

January 5, 2016
This study investigated the extent of racial and ethnic disparities in the health of adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Analyzing data from the 2002-2011 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey and the 2000-2010 National Health Interview Survey, we found that Black and Latino adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities have markedly worse health in contrast to their white peers with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Included in the document is an analysis of policy opportunities around health disparities, including obesity prevalence, among adults with intellectual disabilities.
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Authored
Sandra Magana, Department of Disability and Human Development at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC-DDHD)
Susan Parish, Rehabilitation Research and Training Centers on Developmental Disabilities and Health at the Lurie Institute for Disability Policy, The Heller School for Social Policy and Management, Brandeis University (Lurie Institute)
Miguel Morales, UIC-DDHD
Henan Li, Lurie Institute
Glenn Fujiura, UIC-DDHD
The policy opportunity analysis was authored by
Ben Jackson, Association of University Centers on Disabilities (AUCD)
Adriane Griffen, AUCD

Policy to Practice: Falls in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

August 3, 2016
One out of every three adults aged 65 years or older in the general population falls at least once each year. For adults with intellectual disability (ID), the prevalence of falls is even higher with studies estimating a fall rate ranging from between 29% to 70%. Falls are a major cause of serious injury and hospitalization, and an important public health concern. Using baseline data from the Longitudinal Health and Intellectual Disability Study, we examined the prevalence of falls and potential risk factors for falls in adults with ID.
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Authors
Kelly Hsieh, Department of Disability and Human Development, University of Illinois at Chicago
James H. Rimmer, Civitan International Research Center and Sparks Clinics, University of Alabama at Birmingham
Tamar Heller, Department of Disability and Human Development, University of Illinois at Chicago
Jessica Minor, Association of University Centers on Disabilities, Silver Spring, MD Christine Grosso, Association of University Centers on Disabilities, Silver Spring, MD