New Hampshire Adults with Disabilities Need Better Diabetes Prevention Care

Source: New Hampshire Disability & Public Health Project (DPH) Data Briefs & Reports

In New Hampshire, adults with mobility and cognitive limitations are significantly more likely to experience diabetes (26%) than adults with no disability (9%).1 The disparity in diabetes prevalence results in higher costs to Medicaid programs and poorer health outcomes and quality of life for people with disabilities.2  Promising diabetes prevention care for adults with disabilities includes accessible and inclusive health promotion.

Several factors contribute to a higher risk of diabetes, including:

• Unhealthy eating habits that result, in part, from uninformed and limited food choices;

• Lack of physical activity due to social, environmental, and behavioral barriers; and

• Lack of knowledge and support to address risk factors for diabetes.

Download Diabetes Prevention

Advocacy Skill Building Toolkit – Rural RTC

Advocacy Skill Building Toolkit

Source: Advocacy Skill Building Toolkit – RTC:Rural

This toolkit is a guide for Centers for Independent Living and others to conduct interactive and engaging workshops to facilitate the development of advocacy skills of emerging Independent Living leaders and youth with disabilities. It describes how to introduce advocacy through the facilitation of unique activities and discussions, identifying issues of importance, and putting advocacy skills into practice. A unique approach presented in this toolkit is the use of improv to introduce, invite, and engage others into and with the world of advocacy.

Using improv hones communication and public speaking skills, stimulates fast thinking, and encourages engagement with ideas, all skills that are important for effective advocacy. Improv also provides a supportive environment that allows participants to take risks, try out new ideas, and build their confidence. The activities incorporate different learning styles, and can easily be modified to accommodate everyone.

An important part of advocacy, no matter if the goal is to help one person or many, is establishing a confident voice, developed and supported by a community of peer support. This workshop and accompanying toolkit materials give participants the opportunity to explore their voices, build confidence, and display their skills both verbally as well as in written form. The intent is to provide a safe space among peers and trusted facilitators to introduce the concept of both group and self-advocacy.

Crisis Trends – Crisis Text Line

Crisis Trends aims to empower journalists, researchers, school administrators, parents and all citizens to understand the crises Americans face so we can work together to prevent future crises from happening.

Source: Crisis Trends – Crisis Text Line

Explore trends across texter conversations across all states in the U.S. http://crisistrends.org/

Crisis Text Line: Text 741-741 from anywhere in the USA, anytime, about any type of crisis.

Crime Against Persons with Disabilities, 2009-2015

…for each age group measured except persons age 65 or older, the rate of violent victimization against persons with disabilities was at least 2.5 times the unadjusted rate for those without disabilities.

…persons with cognitive disabilities had the highest victimization rate among the disability types measured for total violent crime…

Source: Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) – Crime Against Persons with Disabilities, 2009-2015 – Statistical Tables

Erika Harrell, Ph.D., BJS Statistician

July 11, 2017    NCJ 250632

Presents 2009-2015 National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) estimates of nonfatal violent crime (rape or sexual assault, robbery, aggravated assault, and simple assault) against persons age 12 or older with disabilities. Disabilities are classified according to six limitations: hearing, vision, cognitive, ambulatory, self-care, and independent living. The report compares the victimization of persons with and without disabilities living in noninstitutionalized households, including distributions by sex, race, Hispanic origin, age, disability type, and other victim characteristics. It also includes crime characteristics, such as victim-offender relationship, time of crime, reporting to police, and use of victim services agencies. NCVS data were combined with data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey to generate victimization rates.

Highlights:

  • During the 5-year aggregate period from 2011 to 2015, for each age group measured except persons age 65 or older, the rate of violent victimization against persons with disabilities was at least 2.5 times the unadjusted rate for those without disabilities.
  • Among those with disabilities, persons ages 12 to 15 (144.1 per 1,000 age 12 or older) had the highest rate of violent victimization among all age groups measured.
  • The rate of violent victimization against males with disabilities was 31.8 per 1,000, compared to 14.1 per 1,000 males without disabilities.
  • For females with disabilities, the rate of violent victimization was 32.8 per 1,000, compared to 11.4 per 1,000 females without disabilities.
  • Males and females had similar rates of total violent victimization in every disability type measured, except independent living disabilities.

Part of the Crime Against People with Disabilities Series

Summary (PDF 197K)
PDF (1M)
ASCII file (27K)
Comma-delimited format (CSV) (Zip format 46K)

Help for using BJS products

About the Source Data
National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS)
To cite this product, use the following link:
http://www.bjs.gov/index.cfm?ty=pbdetail&iid=5986

View All Publications and Products

BUILDing Strong Foundations Farm to Early Care and Education: Working to Equalize Health and Education Outcomes

Source: BUILD Initiative

By Lacy Stephens, Farm to Early Care and Education Associate, National Farm to School Network

Good nutrition and good educational outcomes for young children are inextricably linked. Yet, there is little consistency in terms of the quality of the food that is offered in early care settings. Given that approximately 60 percent of US children under the age of six spend time in some sort of childcare (or non-parental care) setting on a weekly basis, and typically eat breakfast and lunch (and possibly an afternoon snack) at these sites, ensuring the quality of the food is essential.

The Good Food, Great Kids policy overview and case studies, developed in partnership with the National Farm to School Network and the BUILD Initiative, is intended both to share a broad spectrum of existing information about various experiences in building farm-to-ECE supportive policies and to point out how forging greater connections between current policies and the work of farm to ECE can benefit early childcare centers, children, and families.

Continue Reading

The Community Guide to Adult Oral Health Program Implementation

Source: The Oral Health Website

Download Oral Health Guide

The Community Guide to Adult Oral Health Program Implementation (Oral Health Guide), along with the corresponding online database of community-based oral health programs, aims to help groups at the state and local levels start or enhance their own oral health programs for older adults. Here, community-based entities can find key tips, case studies, interactive tools, and other sources of support for creating cost-effective, sustainable programs. The Oral Health Guide can help you replicate or expand an existing program or take steps to design and implement a new program. In addition, recognizing the connection between oral health and overall health, the Oral Health Guide contains advice and links to resources concerning interprofessional collaboration to serve older adults’ oral health needs.

The Oral Health Guide begins with an introduction and includes the following eight key steps to implementation:

  1. Conduct a Needs Assessment: Assessing the specific oral health needs of older adults in your community is a vital first step to implementation.
  2. Develop a Vision, Mission, and Goals: Developing your program’s vision, mission, and goals helps ensure that staff and community partners are working toward a common objective.
  3. Establish Partnerships: Collaborating with a variety of organizations can help strengthen the planning process for a community-based oral health program for older adults and can expand the program’s impact.
  4. Design the Program: As you define your program’s scope, you might choose to replicate, or copy, an existing program; adapt an existing program; or design an entirely new program.
  5. Finance the Program: Obtaining funding is an important step to starting your program and sustaining it over the long term.
  6. Implement the Program: You must consider several key steps as you proceed from planning and preparation to program operations and services delivery.
  7. Evaluate the Program: During the early planning stages of your program, before you start serving older adults, developing an evaluation plan that reflects your program’s vision and mission is imperative.
  8. Ensure Sustainability: Sharing your program results with partners, funders, and other community stakeholders is fundamental to maintain existing relationships, attract support and buy-in from your community, and thereby ensure your program’s long-term sustainability.

The Oral Health Guide also contains an appendix of funding sources for existing oral health programs and acknowledgments for individuals who helped develop the Oral Health Guide.

You can also download a hardcopy version of the Oral Health Guide (PDF, 1.9 MB).

FDA announced its intention to extend the compliance date for the Nutrition Facts Label final rules

FDA announced its intention to extend the compliance date for the Nutrition Facts Label final rules

Source: Labeling & Nutrition > Changes to the Nutrition Facts Label

Original vs. New Format – Infographics to Help Understand the Changes (New Food Label Side by Side Comparacion Paralela)

Compliance Date

On June 13, 2017, the FDA announced its intention to extend the compliance date for the Nutrition Facts Label final rules. The FDA will provide details of the extension through a Federal Register Notice at a later time.

In May 2016, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration finalized the Nutrition Facts and Supplement Facts Label and Serving Size final rules and set the compliance date for July 26, 2018, with an additional year to comply for manufacturers with annual food sales of less than $10 million. After those rules were finalized, industry and consumer groups provided the FDA with feedback regarding the compliance dates.

Continue Reading

Above-normal blood sugar linked to dementia – Harvard Health Blog – Harvard Health Publications

There are many reasons to keep your blood sugar under control: protecting your arteries and nerves are two of them. Here’s another biggie: preventing dementia, the loss of memory and thinking skills that afflicts millions of older Americans. A study published in the New England Journal of Medicine shows that even in people without diabetes, above normal blood sugar is associated with an increased risk of developing dementia.

Source: Above-normal blood sugar linked to dementia – Harvard Health Blog – Harvard Health Publications

There are many reasons to keep your blood sugar under control: protecting your arteries and nerves are two of them. Here’s another biggie: preventing dementia, the loss of memory and thinking skills that afflicts millions of older Americans.

A study published in the New England Journal of Medicine shows that even in people without diabetes, above normal blood sugar is associated with an increased risk of developing dementia. This finding goes beyond previously seen links between diabetes and dementia. “It establishes for the first time, convincingly, that there is a link between dementia and elevated blood sugars in the non-diabetic range,” says study author Dr. David Nathan, a Harvard Medical School professor and the director of the Diabetes Center and Clinical Research Center at Massachusetts General Hospital.

Dr. Nathan teamed up with researchers across the country to look at blood sugar levels in more than 2,000 older adults—the average age was 76—taking part in the Adult Changes in Thought study. The vast majority of the study participants did not have diabetes. What the researchers found is that any incremental increase in blood sugar was associated with an increased risk of dementia—the higher the blood sugar, the higher the risk.

Why? There are only theories. “The speculation is that elevated blood sugar levels are causing more vascular disease, but it may be other metabolic issues. For example, people with elevated blood sugar often have insulin resistance which may be the link that affects our brain cells,” says Dr. Nathan.

The study does not prove that high blood sugar causes dementia, only that there is an association between the two. For that reason, don’t start trying to lower your blood sugar simply to preserve your thinking skills, cautions Dr. Nathan. There’s no evidence that strategy will work, although he says it should be studied.

But it is worth keeping an eye on your blood sugar to try to avoid developing type 2 diabetes. This disease is at epidemic proportions. Almost 26 million Americans—one in 12—have diabetes. High blood sugar is hallmark of this disease. Normal blood sugar is under 100 milligrams per deciliter of blood mg/dL after an eight-hour fast. You have diabetes if your blood sugar is 126 mg/dL or higher after a fast. People with a blood sugar reading of above 100 but below 126 have what’s called prediabetes. Nearly 80 million Americans are in that camp.

Excess blood sugar is a problem because it can lead to a variety of health problems including heart, eye, kidney, and nerve disease.

Taming blood sugar

What if your blood sugar is above normal? There’s good news in that department: You can lower your blood sugar by exercising and, if needed, losing weight. Shifting to a healthier diet with more vegetables, fruits, and whole grains and cutting back on highly refined grains can also help.

Try to get 150 minutes per week of moderate intensity activity, such as brisk walking. If that’s daunting, know that even a little activity can make a big difference in lowering blood sugar levels. Short but frequent walking breaks—as brief as a minute and forty seconds every half hour—can lower blood sugar. So can taking a walk after a meal.

And it doesn’t always have to be official “exercise.” Try taking the stairs more often, parking farther away from the store, and getting up and moving if you’ve been sitting too long. “It’s common sense,” says Dr. Nathan. “The more active you are and the less sedentary, the more likely it is that your muscles can uptake glucose, and the insulin you make will be more effective.”

Also helpful is cutting back your intake of highly refined carbohydrates, especially foods with added sugars such as sucrose, high fructose corn syrup, and also molasses, cane sugar, corn sweetener, raw sugar, syrup, honey or fruit juice concentrates. The American Heart Association recommends no more than 100 calories from sugar or six teaspoons of sugar per day for women, and 150 calories or nine teaspoons of sugar per day for men. If you’re in the prediabetic or diabetic range, you’ll want to work with a dietitian to determine your exact needs.

Making these changes is an investment, to be sure. But the payoff—better physical and mental health—is definitely worth it.

Continue Reading

Healthy People 2020 Health Disparities Data Widget

Source: Office of Minority Health

The Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP) and the Office of Minority Health (OMH) are pleased to announce the release of a new HealthyPeople.gov data search function. The Health Disparities widget is a new way for you to access this health disparities information.

The new widget provides an easy way to find health disparities data related to the Healthy People 2020 objectives for the Leading Health Indicators (LHIs). LHIs are critical health issues that when addressed will help reduce the leading causes of death and preventable illnesses.

It’s easy to embed the widget on your site and give your stakeholders easy access to the latest available disparities data. Once you’ve added the widget, there’s no technical maintenance required. The content will update automatically with the latest available data.

The widget provides charts and graphs of disparities data at your fingertips. Use the widget to browse data by:

  • Disparity type—including disability, education, income, location, race and ethnicity, and sex)
  • Leading Health Indicator

Explore, use and share the widget to help inform issues related to health equity.

Women with Disabilities Need Better Access to Preventive Cancer Screening

Source: University of New Hampshire, Disability and Public Health Project (NH UCEDD)

In NH, women with disabilities are significantly less likely than the general population to comply with breast and cervical cancer screening recommendations of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.  Preventive screenings are especially challenging for women with disabilities due to barriers, such as:

  • Lack of accessible health care facilities and medical equipment; and
  • Health care providers who lack cultural competence with disability and awareness of needed accommodation.

Download Disability & Women’s Health