The Guide to Community Preventive Services and Disability Inclusion

Source: The Guide to Community Preventive Services and Disability Inclusion – ScienceDirect

Why is this important?

  • One in five adults in the United States have some type of disability (CDC, 2017).
  • Adults with disabilities are more likely to be obese, smoke, have high blood pressure, and be physically inactive than adults without disabilities(CDC, 2017).
  • Increased risk for medical conditions, such as heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and some cancers are also more common among adults with disabilities (CDC, 2017).

Introduction

Approximately 40 million people in the U.S. identify as having a serious disability, and people with disabilities experience many health disparitiescompared with the general population. The Guide to Community Preventive Services (The Community Guide) identifies evidence-based programs and policies recommended by the Community Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) to promote health and prevent disease. The Community Guide was assessed to answer the questions: are Community Guide public health intervention recommendations applicable to people with disabilities, and are adaptations required?

Methods

An assessment of 91 recommendations from The Community Guide was conducted for 15 health topics by qualitative analysis involving three data approaches: an integrative literature review (years 1980–2011), key informant interviews, and focus group discussion during 2011.

Results

Twenty-six recommended interventions would not need any adaptation to be of benefit to people with disabilities. Forty-one recommended interventions could benefit from adaptations in communication and technology; 33 could benefit from training adaptations; 31 from physical accessibility adaptations; and 16 could benefit from other adaptations, such as written policy changes and creation of peer support networks. Thirty-eight recommended interventions could benefit from one or more adaptations to enhance disability inclusion.

Conclusions

As public health and healthcare systems implement Task Force recommendations, identifying and addressing barriers to full participation for people with disabilities is important so that interventions reach the entire population. With appropriate adaptations, implementation of recommendations from The Community Guide could be successfully expanded to address the needs of people with disabilities.

Health Promotion in Community Based Organizations: Understanding the Needs and Capacity
Jasmina Sisirak, PhD, MPH and Beth Marks, PhD, RN, FAAN
May 17th, 2018

Webinar 5: Health Promotion in Community Based Organizations: Understanding the Needs and Capacity

3:00 pm, Eastern Standard Time

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Presenters: Jasmina Sisirak, PhD, MPH (jsisirak@uic.edu) and Beth Marks, PhD, RN (bmarks1@uic.edu)

Abstract: Focusing only on motivating individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) to change their behaviors oftentimes results in many people returning to unhealthy behaviors because their environment does not recognize the influence and importance of organizational attitudes, policy, and “corporate cultures” on individual behavior change. We evaluated organizational health promotion programs and services, resources, organizational culture and employee’s perception of knowledge, skills and attitudes in over 70 community based organizations (CBOs) in seven states. We will share the results of our findings and recommendations for improving health promotion capacity within CBOs.

Presenter bios:

Jasmina Sisirak, PhD, MPH is an Associate Director of Training and Dissemination at the RRTCDD and the Research Assistant Professor at the Department of Disability and Human Development, University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). Jasmina received her PhD in Public Health with emphasis in Epidemiology and Community Health. Her research interests consist of nutrition, health literacy, health promotion and curriculum development for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their caregivers. Jasmina is also Associate Director of the HealthMatters Program.

Beth Marks, RN, PhD, FAAN is a Research Associate Professor at the Department of Disability and Human Development, UIC and the Associate Director for Research in the RRTCDD. Her research interests include the empowerment and advancement of persons with disabilities through health promotion, health advocacy, and primary health care. She has published numerous articles and books related to health promotion, health advocacy, and primary health care for people with disabilities. Dr. Marks is also the Director of the HealthMatters Program.

Reported gum disease as a cardiovascular risk factor in adults with intellectual disabilities

Hsieh, K., Murthy, S., Heller, T., Rimmer, J., Yen, G. (2017). Reported gum disease as a cardiovascular risk factor in adults with intellectual disabilities. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, DOI: 10.1111/jir.12438

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jir.12438/abstract

ABSTRACT

Background

Several risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) have been identified among adults with intellectual disabilities (ID). Periodontitis has been reported to increase the risk of developing a CVD in the general population. Given that individuals with ID have been reported to have a higher prevalence of poor oral health than the general population, the purpose of this study was to determine whether adults with ID with informant reported gum disease present greater reported CVD than those who do not have reported gum disease and whether gum disease can be considered a risk factor for CVD.

Methods

Using baseline data from the Longitudinal Health and Intellectual Disability Study from which informant survey data were collected, 128 participants with reported gum disease and 1252 subjects without reported gum disease were identified. A series of univariate logistic regressions was conducted to identify potential confounding factors for a multiple logistic regression.

Results

The series of univariate logistic regressions identified age, Down syndrome, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, reported gum disease, daily consumption of fruits and vegetables and the addition of table salt as significant risk factors for reported CVD. When the significant factors from the univariate logistic regression were included in the multiple logistic analysis, reported gum disease remained as an independent risk factor for reported CVD after adjusting for the remaining risk factors. Compared with the adults with ID without reported gum disease, adults in the gum disease group demonstrated a significantly higher prevalence of reported CVD (19.5% vs. 9.7%; P = .001).

Conclusion

After controlling for other risk factors, reported gum disease among adults with ID may be associated with a higher risk of CVD. However, further research that also includes clinical indices of periodontal disease and CVD for this population is needed to determine if there is a causal relationship between gum disease and CVD.

Low Levels of Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(12), 1503; doi:10.3390/ijerph14121503

Kelly Hsieh 1,* , Thessa I. M. Hilgenkamp 2, Sumithra Murthy 1, Tamar Heller 1 and James H. Rimmer 3
1 Department of Disability and Human Development, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60609, USA
2 Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612, USA
3 School of Health Professions, University of Alabama at Birmingham, SHPB 331, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA

The paper has been published online: http://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/14/12/1503

Abstract
Adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) are more likely to lead sedentary lifestyles and have low levels of physical activity (LLPA). The present study investigated the prevalence of reported LLPA and time spent watching TV in adults with ID and identified the associated factors for these behaviors. The proxy informants of 1618 adults with ID completed the surveys regarding their health behaviors. Multiple logistic regressions were employed for LLPA and multiple linear regressions for time spent watching TV. About 60% of adults with ID had LLPA and average time spent watching TV was 3.4 h a day. Some characteristics and health and function variables were identified as associated factors. While engaging in community activities and involvement in Special Olympics were inversely associated with LLPA, they were not associated with time spent watching TV. Attending day/educational programs or being employed were associated with spending less time watching TV. Findings highlight differential factors associated with LLPA versus TV-watching behavior in adults with ID. Hence, a key strategy aimed at increasing physical activity includes promoting participation in social and community activities, while targeted activities for reducing sedentary behavior might focus on providing day programs or employment opportunities for adults with ID.

National Council for Aging Care’s Comprehensive Guide on Exercising for Seniors

Comprehensive Guide on Exercising for Seniors

When people think about their later years, they usually imagine a life freed from work or career commitments. They hope, too, that this new freedom will allow them to give their full attention to family, friends, and the activities they feel most passionate about. Making this dream a reality, however, requires health and independence, which in turn require a renewed commitment to staying healthy in general and to maintaining that health through exercise.

The good news, though, is that exercise confers all the same benefits to seniors that it does to those earlier in life, including increased longevity, improved mental clarity, a boost in energy, and greater strength to meet the physical demands of daily living. This is true even if you don’t start exercising until your later years. And while older people tend to become more sedentary as retirement and the challenges of old age restrict their activities, that doesn’t mean that you can’t make a reasonable course of exercise a part of your life or the life of a loved one.

With that in mind, here is everything you need to know about keeping an active lifestyle well into your senior years.

Obesity and Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities A Research to Policy Brief

William H. Neumeier1, Christine Grosso2, James H. Rimmer1

1 University of Alabama at Birmingham and Lakeshore Foundation Research Collaborative

2 Association of University Centers on Disabilities

Obesity is an increasingly common condition that is characterized by an increase in the number and size of fat cells in the body. Obesity is most commonly measured by Body Mass Index (BMI), with a BMI ranging from 25-29.9 kilograms per meter squared (kg/m2) indicating an individual is overweight, and a rate greater than 30 kg/m2 indicating a state of obesity. Rates of overweight and obesity among child and adult populations are an increasing healthcare concern. The number of individuals who are overweight or obese has increased over the past 40 years [1]. This has resulted in an increased focus, understanding, and action for obesity treatment.

Obesity rates are a concern for the general population, but research findings consistently report even higher rates of obesity among individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report approximately 35% of the general population is obese, while the rate of obesity among adults with IDD is as high as 58.5% in the United States [2-5]. The consequences of obesity predispose adults with IDD to a greater risk of secondary health conditions that can impair their health status and quality of life. In addition, individuals with IDD may possess non-modifiable risk factors for obesity, such as mobility limitations or factors related to the individual’s diagnosis. Secondary risk factors, such as barriers to physical activity, lack of social support, higher levels of food insecurity, limited access to proper nutrition, medications that may influence weight, and transportation, may also increase susceptibility to obesity for a child or adult with IDD [2, 6]. In total, obesity is a complex, multi-faceted condition that needs greater attention in the IDD population. The 2005 Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Improve the Health and Wellness of Persons with Disabilities emphasizes equal opportunities for healthy living for individuals with disabilities. This policy brief will highlight known issues related to obesity in general, issues uniquely related to obesity for individuals with IDD, and provide recommendations and resources for addressing these issues.

Download Research Brief for Results

Project SEARCH and HealthMatters Program 2017-2018 Employment, Health, and Wellness Webinar Series

  1. Better Health by Health Education & Sustained Employment September 28st, 2017
  2. Promoting Health and Leadership in Project SEARCH® Programs October, 12th, 2017
  3. Integrating Technology to Increase Student Interns’ Health, Fitness, and Personal Responsibilities October, 26th, 2017
  4. Using the Health Matters Curriculum with the Project SEARCH® Program Model January, 18st, 2018
  5. Mindfulness: Strategies for Building Success and Wellness in the 21st Century Workforce February, 15th, 2018


 

PLEASE NOTE

  • There is no cost for these webinars.
  • CEUs are not offered for these webinars.
  • For disability accommodations email Jasmina Sisirak (jsisirak@uic.edu) at least 10 days before the webinars.

The webinars are hosted by the HealthMatters ProgramTM in partnership with Project SEARCH® and funded by The Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Developmental Disabilities and Health (RRTCDD). The RRTCDD is funded through United States Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Community Living (ACL), National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR), Grant # 90RT5020-01-00, and a grant from the Ohio Developmental Disabilities Council.

Using the Health Matters Curriculum with the Project SEARCH® Program Model

Source: HealthMatters WebEx Event Center

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 Description:    Project SEARCH is committed to supporting health and fitness education during the transition to employment. Accordingly, Project SEARCH partnered with UnitedHealthcare last year to provide Project SEARCH sites with Health Matters: The Exercise and Nutrition Health Education Curriculum for People with Developmental Disabilities. More recently, we were awarded a grant from the Ohio DD Council to study the use of the Health Matters curriculum in the context of Project SEARCH. As a first step, we surveyed Project SEARCH Instructors on their experience with the Health Matters curriculum and other health and fitness activities. The purpose was to learn about both the successes and obstacles that instructors encountered. The results of that survey will be presented here, and we plan to gather additional information from members of the audience in an informal focus group discussion. Ultimately, we plan to create and test a clear set of guidelines for integrating the Health Matters curriculum into Project SEARCH in a manner that will optimize learning of health and fitness principles without interfering with the primary Project SEARCH goal of competitive employment.
PRESENTERS  Maryellen Daston, PhD, Program Specialist, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, Cincinnati, OH. Maryellen is a technical writer with a background in biomedical research. Prior to her current position with Project SEARCH, she was involved with research in the field of developmental neuroscience. In her current position, Maryellen works with the Project SEARCH central administration team at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. Maryellen manages the Project SEARCH database and is responsible for editing and writing content for the Project SEARCH website, articles for professional journals, and other communications. She is also involved with researching funding opportunities, writing grant proposals, and overseeing research related to Project SEARCH. In addition, Maryellen co-authored the book on the history, philosophy, and practices that define the Project SEARCH model, “High School Transition that Works: Lessons Learned from Project SEARCH”, Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.
PRESENTATION CONTRIBUTORS

 

  1. Julie Christensen, PhD, LMSW, Director, Center for Disabilities and Development (UCEDD), University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA. Julie is the Director of Iowa’s University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (UCEDD), Center for Disabilities and Development (CDD), at the University of Iowa. Prior to joining CDD in May 2016, Dr. Christensen served as the Director of Employment Programs at Strong Center for Developmental Disabilities (UCEDD), at the University of Rochester Medical Center. Dr. Christensen’s background encompasses work in schools, not-for-profits, government and higher education. For the past 14 years, her career has centered around improving quality of life outcomes for at-risk youth, including youth with intellectual and development disabilities, through promoting employment and access to leisure and recreation opportunities in inclusive settings. She has considerable experience developing, administering, and evaluating federal, state and local grant-funded projects with an emphasis on cross-systems collaboration and systems change. She currently maintains a research faculty appointment in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, and adjunct appointments in the Department of Pediatrics, Division of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics and the University of Iowa School of Social Work. Her research is in the areas of employment, quality of life, and leisure and recreation participation of adolescents and young adults with IDD.
  2. Dennis Cleary, Co-Director of the Transition, Employment, and Technology (TET) Lab, Columbus, OH. Dennis is an Assistant Professor of Occupational Therapy at The Ohio State University. His primary area of interest is transition services for young adults with disabilities and promoting their employment outcomes In partnership with the Transition group at the Nisonger Center, Dr. Cleary works to test and refine methods to support young adults in academic, social, and work environments through the use of technology, activity analysis, education, and job matching strategies. Dr. Cleary has received funding from the U.S. Department of Education.
  3. Karen Guo is an Occupational Therapy Doctoral Student at The Ohio State University in Columbus, OH.
  4. Beth Marks, RN, PhD, Research Associate Professor, University of Illinois, Chicago, IL. Beth is a Research Associate Professor in the Department of Disability and Human Development, University of Illinois at Chicago, Associate Director for Research in the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Aging with Developmental Disabilities, and President, National Organization of Nurses with Disabilities. Beth directs research programs on empowerment and advancement of persons with disabilities. She has published numerous articles and books related to health promotion, health advocacy, and primary health care for people with disabilities. She co-produced a film entitled “Open the Door, Get ‘Em a Locker: Educating Nursing Students with Disabilities.” She has also authored two books published in 2010 entitled Health Matters: The Exercise and Nutrition Health Education Curriculum for People with Developmental Disabilitiesand Health Matters for People with Developmental Disabilities: Creating a Sustainable Health Promotion Program.
  5. Jasmina Sisirak, PhD, MPH, Research Assistant Professor, University of Illinois at Chicago; Chicago, IL. Jasmina is an Associate Director of Training and Dissemination in the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Developmental Disabilities and health (RRTCDD) in the Department of Disability and Human Development at University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). Her research interests consist of nutrition, health literacy, and health promotion for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities. She coordinates several health promotion projects in the RRTCDD; and has written publications and presented papers in the area of disability, health, and nutrition. Jasmina has co-authored two books entitled Health Matters: The Exercise and Nutrition Health Education Curriculum for People with Developmental Disabilities and Health Matters for People with Developmental Disabilities: Creating a Sustainable Health Promotion Program.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

These webinars are hosted by the HealthMatters ProgramTM in partnership with Project SEARCH® and funded by The Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Developmental Disabilities and Health (RRTCDD). The RRTCDD is funded through United States Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Community Living (ACL), National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR), Grant # 90RT5020-01-00, and a grant from the Ohio Developmental Disabilities Council.

Integrating Technology to Increase Student Interns’ Health, Fitness, and Personal Responsibilities

 

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Resources:

Potential Funders:

 

Webinar Handouts:

Description:

In this webinar, we will share our success utilizing technology to improve student interns’ health, stamina, and independence. During our first year of our Project SEARCH program we have incorporated 6 Chromebooks, 2 iPads, and Fitbits for every intern. We will demonstrate how we created Google Accounts for each intern so they have access to their own G Suites to create an email address and Google Drive where they create resumes, letters, upload photos, create presentations, and share documents that they will have access to throughout their adult lives. We will also demonstrate how we utilize Google Drive to create a shared Project SEARCH Steering committee folder so all members can collaborate and have access to documents and resources at all times. We will also share how we incorporated Fitbits into daily lessons in combination with Health Matters: The Exercise and Nutrition Health Education Curriculum for People with Developmental Disabilities. Interns record all food and water consumed during the day, plus their daily activity is tracked by logging active minutes throughout the day, calories burned, total steps, and miles traveled during the day. Project SEARCH instructor is able to make connections with intern Fitbit data and Health Matters curriculum for student interns to learn the importance of nutrition and physical activity. We were also able to identify how the Fitbit can be used to make adaptations for the Interns to improve time on task and their time management skills. With the access to two iPads we incorporated a time in and time out app that student interns utilize to sign in and out for their internship rotations and for their lunch breaks. This data is incorporated into real life math lessons.

CEUs: There will be no CEUs provided for this presentation.PRESENTERS

Mason Messinger, Project SEARCH Instructor, Kalahari Resort, Pocono Manor, PA.

Dawn Diagnault, Director of Career Options and Opportunities, Human Resources Inc., Effort, PA. Dawn is the Director of Career Options and Development at the Human Resources Center, Inc. where she has been assisting individuals with disabilities in their employment goals for almost 14 years. Ms. Daignault holds a Bachelor’s degree in Disability studies from CUNY as well as an Associate’s degree in social work. She is a member of the steering committee for the Project SEARCH-Kalahari, Poconos site and serves as the supervisor of the provider agency staff.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

These webinars are hosted by the HealthMatters ProgramTM in partnership with Project SEARCH® and funded by The Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Developmental Disabilities and Health (RRTCDD). The RRTCDD is funded through United States Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Community Living (ACL), National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR), Grant # 90RT5020-01-00, and a grant from the Ohio Developmental Disabilities Council.

Mindfulness: Strategies for Building Success and Wellness in the 21st Century Workforce

 

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Date and time: Thursday, February 15, 2018 2:00-3:00 pm (Eastern Time)
Description:

This webinar will discuss the use of mindfulness strategies for building success and wellness among people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) within their worksites. “Mindfulness tools” will be reviewed for participants to incorporate with their students and employees with IDD in the classroom or in the workplace.

PRESENTER

Stefanie Patterson, Cape Cod, Riverview School’s Project SEARCH Instructor. Stefanie is a certified English and special education teacher and has been in the field of education for over 20 years. She is also a life-long yoga practitioner and is licensed through Finding Inner Peace Yoga School and is a member of the National Yoga Alliance & the Cape Cod Yoga Association [CCYA] with specialty certifications in pre/post-natal yoga, children/teen yoga and Mindfulness Meditation.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

These webinars are hosted by the HealthMatters ProgramTM in partnership with Project SEARCH® and funded by The Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Developmental Disabilities and Health (RRTCDD). The RRTCDD is funded through United States Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Community Living (ACL), National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR), Grant # 90RT5020-01-00, and a grant from the Ohio Developmental Disabilities Council.