Securing rights and nutritional health for persons with intellectual disabilities – a pressing challenge | Food & Nutrition Research

Source: Securing rights and nutritional health for persons with intellectual disabilities – a pressing challenge | Food & Nutrition Research

Svein Olav Kolset Sigrun Hope Kjetil Retterstøl Marianne Nordstrøm Per Ole Iversen

DOI: https://doi.org/10.29219/fnr.v62.1268

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Abstract

Persons with intellectual disabilities (ID) are dependent on nutritional policies that have so far not been addressed in a systematic and health-promoting manner in Norway and other nations with a high socioeconomic standard. In many poor countries, such issues have not even been raised nor addressed. Nutritional issues facing persons with ID include the risk of both underweight and overweight. Deficiency in energy, vitamins, essential fatty acids and micronutrients can increase the risk of additional health burdens in already highly vulnerable individuals. According to the World Health Organization, the obesity rates have tripled worldwide the last decades, and recent studies suggest that the prevalence of obesity is even higher for persons with ID than in the general population. This implies additional burdens of life style diseases such as diabetes and hypertension for adults with ID. According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-5, this group is characterized by intellectual difficulties as well as difficulties in conceptual, social, and practical areas of living. Their reduced intellectual capacity implies that they often have difficulties in making good dietary choices. As a group, they are dependent upon help and guidance to promote a healthy life style. To improve their health, there is a need for improved national services and for more research on lifestyle and nutritional issues in persons with ID. From a human rights perspective, these issues must be put on the agenda both in relevant UN fora and in the respective nations’ health policies.

Keywords: Intellectual disabilities; Nutrition; Health; Obesity; Staff nutritional competence; Specific syndromes; Nutritional policies

Introducing Active Engagement: A new program for teaching cooking skills to individuals with IDD – Webinar

Source: Introducing Active Engagement: A new program for teaching cooking skills to individuals with IDD

Presented by Janice Goldschmidt, MS, RD, LDN

Content Overview:

This presentation will launch a book that will be published by AAIDD in June. The title is Active Engagement: Teaching Authentic Cooking Skills to Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities. Janice Goldschmidt, the author, will provide an overview of the book that draws on the evidence-based structure of the program as well as the philosophical foundation. A Registered Dietitian and experienced IDD practitioner, Ms. Goldschmidt has spent the last decade working with individuals with disabilities on the development of cooking skills as a form of nutritional intervention and as a way of teaching practical skills to promote independence and self-determination. The presentation will include a brief discussion of some of the epidemiological trends for the IDD population and how development of cooking capacity can help mitigate some of the health-related pathologies associated with the high rates of obesity. The conceptual framework for the program will be introduced, and the author will explain how the emphasis on choice and individualization make Active Engagement very different from traditional cooking programs for the IDD population. Introductory teaching activities using adaptive tools will be addressed, as well as important steps needed to adapt recipes for those with IDD. Food skills, activities that support cooking but that are not directly related, will also be introduced as another means of drawing individuals with IDD into the realm of food preparation.

It is anticipated that this introductory tour of Active Engagement will help caregivers, support staff, educators, and practitioners from a wide range of disciplines develop an understanding of how this new book can be incorporated into programs or activities. At the close of the presentation, the author will take questions and offer problem-solving suggestions in response to specific issues that participants have experienced.

This is an AAIDD webinar. 

Family Leisure Toolkit | Parents with Mental Illnesses

Leisure participation is important for the development of healthy family relationships.

Source: Family Leisure Toolkit | Parents with Mental Illnesses

Leisure Education Toolkit for Parents with Mental Illnesses

 

This toolkit is an evidence-based guide that will help parents better understand the importance of family leisure and develop strategies to participate in meaningful family leisure. Research on the need for family leisure, potential benefits, and strategies to increase participation are presented. This user friendly guide provides worksheets and activities that parents can use with their children to make the most out of family leisure. For individuals who want to receive additional support, each section also provides an opportunity to summarize goals and issues that can be shared with a mental health professional. Download now to learn more about: (1) the benefits of family leisure; (2) core and balance family leisure; (3) strategies to assess family leisure interest; (4) barriers to and facilitators of family leisure; (5) planning and making time for family leisure; and (6) using leisure to talk with your kids about mental illnesses.

Health Matters | The Arc of San Antonio

Amerigroup is proud to support The Arc of San Antonio

Source: Health Matters | The Arc of San Antonio

San Antonio, TX – According to the Centers for Disease Control, adults with disabilities have an almost 60 percent higher rate of obesity than adults without disabilities. The Arc of San Antonio is thrilled to announce that for the second consecutive year, it will be receiving a grant from Anthem Foundation to support the Health and Fitness for All project. This grant was made possible, thanks to an almost $88,000 national grant from Amerigroup’s parent company foundation, which will be used to conduct this health project at nine chapters of The Arc in Texas, Wisconsin, and Kentucky. The mission of The Arc is to enrich the lives of those with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). The Arc of San Antonio operates two day activity centers in San Antonio and works with over 200 adults with I/DD on a daily basis.

“Amerigroup is proud to support The Arc of San Antonio and is dedicated to working to help ensure that Texans of all abilities have programs in their communities that will help ensure they lead healthy lifestyles,” said Tisch Scott, Amerigroup Texas president.

The Health and Fitness for All project utilizes the HealthMatters™ curriculum, which is a training developed by the University of Illinois at Chicago that provides structured information on how to organize and start a tailored physical activity and health education program for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD).

In the first year of the grant, The Arc of San Antonio worked with local Amerigroup officials and Methodist Healthcare Ministries, which supports The Arc’s nursing program, to administer the HealthMatters curriculum to 53 individuals! The curriculum implements a 12-week program which helps increase participants’ knowledge about the importance of healthy eating and staying active.

This year, in collaboration with The YMCA, The Arc will target 75 individuals in underserved areas of San Antonio for the HealthMatters program. “We are excited about the prospect of expanding this sustainable program outside of our four walls and look forward to making a lasting impact on these new participants and their families,” said Marissa Herrera, RN at The Arc of San Antonio, who is coordinating the program locally.

“Leading a healthy lifestyle is difficult for everyone, including people with I/DD. The Arc is fortunate to have the generous support of the Anthem Foundation so we can continue to provide education and resources that will help people with I/DD make healthier decisions in their daily lives,” said Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc.

 

Editor’s Note: The Arc is not an acronym; always refer to us as The Arc, not The ARC and never ARC. The Arc should be considered as a title or a phrase.

Y Living Center – YMCA of Greater San Antonio

Source: Y Living Center – YMCA of Greater San Antonio

In partnership with The ARC of San Antonio, Health Matters™ is a program designed for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their caregivers who want to become better informed about their own health, nutrition, and fitness.

Child Exercising
  • 12-week program that will meet three times a week
  • 1.5 hours per session (45 minutes of education & 45 minutes of physical activity)
  • Topics Include: Nutrition, Creating an Exercise Plan, Friendship & Support
 For more information contact the Y Living Center at (210)404-0135. 

The Arc Awarded Grant from Anthem Foundation for Health and Fitness for All Project

Source: The Arc Awarded Grant from Anthem Foundation for Health and Fitness for All Project | The Arc Blog

Grant will support programming in Kentucky, Texas and Wisconsin

Washington, DC – The Arc is pleased to announce it has received nearly $88,000 of funding from the Anthem Foundation, the philanthropic arm of Anthem, Inc., to support the Health and Fitness for All project. The project’s training curriculum was developed by the University of Illinois at Chicago, and provides overall structured information on how to organize and start a tailored physical activity and health education program for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). The award will be used to conduct this health project at nine chapters certified in the HealthMatters curriculum at The Arc in Kentucky, Texas, and Wisconsin.

In 2016, The Arc received comparable funding for this initiative from the Anthem Foundation. The program resulted in roughly half of participants reporting a healthy blood pressure, along with 71% of participants revealing increased knowledge of healthy foods and healthy behaviors. Drawing on a very successful first year, the nine chapters will implement the 12-week program with a drive to increase results to approximately 225 participants at the following locations: The Arc of Kentucky, The Arc of Central Kentucky, The Arc of Barren County (KY), The Pointe Arc in Northern Kentucky, The Arc of San Antonio (TX), The Arc of Wisconsin, The Arc Greater Columbia County (WI), The Arc of Racine County, Inc. (WI) and The Arc Fond du Lac (WI).

“Leading a healthy lifestyle is difficult for everyone, including people with I/DD. The Arc is fortunate to have the generous support of the Anthem Foundation so we can continue to provide education and resources that will help people with I/DD make healthier decisions in their daily lives,” said Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc. According to the Centers for Disease Control, adults with disabilities have a 58% higher rate of obesity than adults without disabilities due to certain challenges individuals face with I/DD related to eating healthy, maintaining weight and being physically active. Nonetheless, since 2012, The Arc has continued to reach over 700 participants with the use of the HealthMatters curriculum and provided those with I/DD the tools and resources needed to lead healthier lives.

“We’re pleased to team with The Arc to continue to support their efforts to ensure all individuals, regardless of their abilities, have access to information that encourages a healthier lifestyle,” said Craig Samitt, MD, chief clinical officer at Anthem, Inc. “The results of their program are further evidence of the value they bring to the communities they serve to help create a healthier generations of Americans.”

The Arc advocates for and serves people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), including Down syndrome, autism, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders, cerebral palsy and other diagnoses. The Arc has a network of more than 665 chapters across the country promoting and protecting the human rights of people with I/DD and actively supporting their full inclusion and participation in the community throughout their lifetimes and without regard to diagnosis.

About Anthem Foundation

The Anthem Foundation is the philanthropic arm of Anthem, Inc. and through charitable contributions and programs, the Foundation promotes the inherent commitment of Anthem, Inc. to enhance the health and well-being of individuals and families in communities that Anthem, Inc. and its affiliated health plans serve. The Foundation focuses its funding on strategic initiatives that address and provide innovative solutions to health care challenges, as well as promoting the Healthy Generations Program, a multi-generational initiative that targets specific disease states and medical conditions. These disease states and medical conditions include: prenatal care in the first trimester, low birth weight babies, cardiac morbidity rates, long term activities that decrease obesity and increase physical activity, diabetes prevalence in adult populations, adult pneumococcal and influenza vaccinations and smoking cessation. The Foundation also coordinates the company’s year-round Associate Giving program which provides a 50 percent match of associates’ pledges, as well as its Volunteer Time Off and Dollars for Doers community service programs. To learn more about the Anthem Foundation, please visit http://www.anthem.foundation and its blog at http://anthemfoundation.tumblr.com.

Bike Share Intervention: Improving Wellness & Community Access

Download Bike Share Program Manual

At The Collaborative, we love biking! Many of us are active cyclists who peddle our path to fun and fitness. As biking grows in popularity, we want to do our part to encourage consumers to give it a try. In this effort, The Temple University Collaborative recently led four bike pilot programs for consumers of mental healthcare services in Philadelphia. Providers, consumers, bikeshare representatives, and bike advocacy groups worked with us to develop and run groups. Everyone seemed as excited as us throughout the process.

Each program consisted of six classes led during a three-week period. Participants learned laws and safe riding practices. Then they planned and participated in group rides using Indego Bikeshare Bikes. Participants reported that they enjoyed the classes, learned how to bike safely, found new things to do in their communities during group rides, and enhanced social connections with other bike group members. One group of consumers even advocated for a weekly bike group which has since been included in ongoing programming at their agency.

In an effort to encourage agencies to run similar programming, we’ve developed the Biking & Serious Mental Illness manual which outlines the classes we led and shares what we learned through running these programs.

City Health Dashboard

Empowering cities to create thriving communities:  Explore health in your city

Source: https://www.cityhealthdashboard.com/

Learn how other communities have successfully woven health into their decision-making around issues such as education, access to affordable housing, and unemployment. This section includes new articles on how cities are using the Dashboard, posts from the City Health Dashboard team, and feature stories that show how cities are building healthier communities.

Metrics Background

The City Health Dashboard allows you to see where the nation’s 500 largest cities stand on 36 key measures of health and factors affecting health across five areas: Health Behaviors, Social and Economic Factors, Physical Environment, Health Outcomes, and Clinical Care. These categories align with those used in the County Health Rankings & Roadmaps, a well-known program that provides health data at the county level. Data come from federal, state, and other datasets with rigorous standards for collection and analysis. The Dashboard team chose these measures, with guidance from a City Advisory Committee, because cities can act on them, they were collected within the last four years, they are updated regularly, and they are backed by evidence. Below, you will find information on each metric including a metric description, data source, years of data, how the measure is calculated, and a link to more information.

Expansion of Successful Online Population Health Resource Will Give More U.S. Cities Access to Key Health Data

Hundreds of United States cities will be able to identify their most pressing health needs more accurately—thanks to a nationwide expansion of the City Health Dashboard, an innovative health data visualization tool.

Created by the Department of Population Health at NYU Langone Medical Center and the Robert F. Wagner School of Public Service at NYU, in partnership with the National Resource Network, the City Health Dashboard launched earlier this yearin four cities. It will expand to 500 additional cities over the next two years through a $3.4 million grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation—with the ultimate goal of becoming a central health improvement planning resource for U.S. cities with populations of 70,000 or more, or one-third of the U.S. population.

Users of the City Health Dashboard have the ability to view their city’s performance in 26 key measures of health, like obesity and primary care physician coverage; and drivers of health status, such as housing affordability, high school graduation rate, food access, and opioid deaths. For many of the measures, data can be accessed at the neighborhood level.

Marc Gourevitch, MD, MPH, chair of the Department of Population Health at NYU Langone and the program’s principal architect, points out that the City Health Dashboard responds to increased interest by cities in data on benchmark measures of health, health determinants, and equity. Currently most data of this scope has only been available at the county level—posing challenges to urban health improvement efforts.

“There is an old adage: ‘what gets measured is what gets done,” Dr. Gourevitch says. “Community leaders want accurate, actionable, and precise data to advance initiatives that improve health, bring down costs, and focus on community wellbeing. We’re excited to be at the vanguard of providing this important information to cities across the country.”

How the City Health Dashboard Works

The City Health Dashboard places in the hands of city leaders and community organizations a responsive and highly reliable web interface with regularly refreshed health-related data—overseen by a team of epidemiologists, population health and urban policy experts, and geographic information system specialists.

Data presented by the City Health Dashboard are drawn from federal and state governments and other organizations that apply rigorous methodology to data collection, including the U.S. Census Bureau, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Environmental Protection Agency.

“In our work with cities across the nation, we’ve learned that their governments want to improve the physical health of their residents as well as the fiscal health of their municipalities,” says David Eichenthal, executive director of National Resource Network. “Nationally scaling this resource will help place health at the center of local agenda-setting, improve efficiencies, save city-level expenses, and address the need for comparable data at the local level.”

The expanded City Health Dashboard will offer enhanced technical support features to cities more actively engaged in data-driven policy-making. All cities will have access to features to compare peer cities and neighborhoods, tools for tracking performance, and resources to deep-dive into more advanced microdata interfacing.

The four pilot cities—Flint, Michigan; Kansas City, Kansas; Providence, Rhode Island; and Waco, Texas—are already incorporating the City Health Dashboard into their efforts to improve health. For example, Prosper Waco, a nonprofit organization, is using the site to help determine its inner city’s need for services related to high teen birth rate.

Says Dr. Gourevitch: “We hope the site will serve as a platform for cities to share and gather knowledge to improve outcomes on some of the most pressing health challenges our society faces.”

Activity for All Children | CDC

Everybody needs physical activity for good health. However, most children do not participate in any organized physical activity during non-school hours. See how inclusive after-school programs can help increase physical activity among children of all abilities.

Source: Activity for All Children | Features | CDC

Children and adolescents ages 6 years and older should perform at least one hour of physical activity each day. This amount of physical activity helps control weight, improves mental health, bone health and fitness, and reduces risk factors for chronic diseases such as heart disease and diabetes. Nevertheless, many children and adolescents are not getting this suggested amount of daily physical activity.

The lack of physical activity only increases for youth with a disability1. In fact, compared to youth without disability, youth with a disability have a 35 percent higher prevalence of overweight and obesity2 with an increased risk of secondary conditions associated with being overweight3.

After-school programs across the country have been working hard to provide opportunities for youth to get the recommended amount of physical activity.  The most current data show that 10.2 million children take part in some after-school program and this number continues to rise4.

CDC’s funded partner, the National Center on Health, Physical Activity and Disability (NCHPAD), is working with one such after-school program, Girls on the Run, to make the program more inclusive of young girls with disabilities.

Girls on the Run is a physical activity-based positive youth development program for young girls in grades 3 through 8. The program uses a fun, experience-based curriculum to teach life skills through dynamic, interactive lessons and running games.  Running and physical activity are used to inspire and to motivate the girls, to encourage lifelong health and fitness, and to build confidence through accomplishment. At the end of each 10-week season, the girls, their coaches, and running buddies (family and community volunteers) complete a celebratory 5k running event that gives them a tangible sense of achievement and a framework for setting and achieving life goals.

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