Health services use and costs for Americans with intellectual and developmental disabilities: A national analysis

Fujiura, G. T.,Li, H., & Magana, S. (2018) Health services use and costs for Americans with intellectual and developmental disabilities: A national analysis. Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities. 56, (2) p. 101–118. DOI: 10.1352/1934-9556-56.2.101

Abstract

Health services and associated costs for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) were nationally profiled and the predictors of high expense users statistically modeled. Using linked data from the National Health Interview Survey and Medical Expenditure Panel Survey for the years 2002 through 2011, the study found a mixed pattern of differences in rates of service use and costs when compared to the general population depending upon personal characteristics, health status, and type of health care service. Prescription medication costs were the primary driver of total health care expenditures for Americans with IDD. The presence of secondary chronic health conditions and poor mental health status were the consistent predictors of high expense users across types of health care. Study results are discussed in terms of implications for more nuanced evaluations of health care costs and need for recurring surveillance of health care for Americans with IDD in the years following passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

Impact of Medicaid Managed Care on Illinois’s acute health services expenditures for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities

Yamaki, K., Wing, C., Mitchell, D., Owen, R. & Heller, T. (2018) Impact of Medicaid Managed Care on Illinois’s acute health services expenditures for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities, Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, 56 (2), p. 133–146. DOI: 10.1352/1934-9556-56.2.133

Abstract

States have increasingly transitioned Medicaid enrollees with disabilities from fee-for-service (FFS)to Medicaid Managed Care (MMC), intending to reduce state Medicaid spending and to provide better access to health services. Yet, previous studies on the impact of MMC are limited and findings are inconsistent. We analyzed the impact of MMC on costs by tracking Illinois’s Medicaid acute health services expenditures for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) living in the community (n ¼ 1,216) before and after their transition to MMC. Results of the difference-in-differences (DID) regression analysis using an inverse propensity score weight (IPW) matched comparison group (n¼1,134) design suggest that there were no significant state Medicaid cost savings in transitioning people with IDD from FFS to MMC.

Improving diabetes care for people with ID: a qualitative study exploring the perceptions and experiences of professionals in diabetes and ID services

Source: Brown – 2017 – Journal of Intellectual Disability Research – Wiley Online Library

Abstract

Background

Globally, diabetes is increasing with concerns about the impact on outcomes, including premature death and the costs associated with managing the condition. Research indicates that adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) are two to three times more likely to develop diabetes; however, there has been limited focus on diabetes service utilisation in this population. The aim of this study is to explore the perceptions and experiences of diabetes and ID practitioners.

Methods

A series of 1:1 semi-structured interviews were undertaken in one Scottish health service area. In total, 29 qualitative interviews were conducted: 10 with diabetes practitioners from primary and secondary care, 14 from ID services and 5 from community care services regarding diabetes service provision for this population. Thematic content analysis was undertaken to identify the themes and subthemes.

Results

Three main themes were identified: (1) enabling access to services to meet diabetes-related care needs of people with ID; (2) communication and service improvements between staff, patients and across services; and (3) providing person-centred diabetes care and developing adapted resources to increase patient self-care.

Conclusions

The findings of this study have important international implications in how diabetes practitioners plan and deliver services for people with ID and other vulnerable groups with limited cognitive ability and communication skills and difficulties in self-management. The findings highlight that access to diabetes education and adapted resources is needed, and if ‘reasonable adjustments’ are made to service provision and practice, people with ID can benefit from improved healthcare. Developing joint clinics to share knowledge and resources between diabetes and ID practitioners may improve service delivery and continuity of care, and thereby diminish the costs of not providing quality care.