NPs Promoting Physical Activity: People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

Marks, B. & Sisirak, J. (2017). NPs Promoting Physical Activity: People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities. The Journal for Nurse Practitioners, 13(1), e1–e5. DOI: 10.1016/j.nurpra.2016.10.023

Abstract

People with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) are not residing in large congregate care centers due to legislative, attitudinal, and treatment changes, and they are living longer than their peers of previous generations. With the absence of inclusive and accessible health promotion, people with IDD are experiencing a constellation of health issues related to negative determinants of health. This article aims to raise awareness among nurse practitioners that people with IDD need support from their health care providers to be physical active. A secondary aim is to discuss barriers and resources for people with IDD to be more physically active.

 

 

 

Health Care Costs for Americans with I/DD: A National Analysis of Access and Spending 2002-2011 Based on the MEPS/NHIS

Health Care Costs for Americans with I/DD: A National Analysis of Access and Spending 2002-2011 Based on the MEPS/NHIS

Presenters: Glenn T Fujiura, Sandra Magaña, Henan Li, & Susan Parish


RRTCDD 2016 Health and Wellness Series Webinar

WebEx recording is available for viewing “Health Care Costs for Americans with I/DD: A National Analysis of Access and Spending 2002-2011 Based on the MEPS/NHIS” (
Recording) (PowerPoint Slides)

Cultural Competence Revisited: Nursing Students with Disabilities

Cultural Competence Revisited: Nursing Students with Disabilities (2007). Marks, B. Journal of Nursing Education, 46(2).

The demographic profile of students in nursing schools is changing in relation to many different cultural backgrounds. Despite the potential for students with disabilities to enrich the nursing profession, nurse educators may be perpetuating historical attitudes, values, and practices that exclude students with disabilities from gaining admission or identifying themselves as people with disabilities. Educators in nursing schools continue to ask whether people with disabilities have a place in the nursing profession, while the more salient question is, “When will people with disabilities have a place in the nursing profession?” More important, as we create environments that welcome students with disabilities into the nursing profession, how does the quality of nursing care improve and become more appropriate for people with different cultural experiences? The purpose of this article is to present the value of recruiting students with disabilities into nursing schools in order to enhance culturally competent nursing care.

Cultural Competence Revisited: Nursing Students with Disabilities

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17315565