What Would Happen If Health Care in Your State Improved? – The Commonwealth Fund

This interactive tool shows the health care gains your state could achieve by improving its performance on measures of access, quality, and health outcomes. The tool draws on data from the 2015 Commonwealth Fund Scorecard on State Health System Performance.

Source: What Would Happen If Health Care in Your State Improved? – The Commonwealth Fund

The Commonwealth Fund’s Scorecard on State Health System Performance, 2017 Edition, assessed states on more than 40 indicators of health care access, quality, costs, and outcomes. Use this interactive tool to see the gains that your state could achieve by improving its performance to the level of better-performing states, as well as the losses that would result if your state failed to sustain its performance. You can also see the impact of reaching for a goal that is even better than the current best state’s performance.

In a new To the Point post, The Commonwealth Fund’s David Radley, Douglas McCarthy, and Susan Hayes show how states can use the tool to help achieve their goals. For example, by seeing the gains made in states that have already expanded Medicaid, policymakers in Georgia or another non-expansion state can calculate the improvements in insurance coverage and access to care that are within their reach.

CompareMaine

CompareMaine shows the average cost of common healthcare procedures at different facilities in Maine. You can also see patient experience ratings and how Maine hospitals compare on patient safety.

Source: CompareMaine

more information. better decisions.

Compare Costs of Healthcare Procedures and Quality of Care Across Maine

The Maine Health Data Organization, in collaboration with the Maine Quality Forum, is required by law to promote the transparency of healthcare cost and quality information via a publicly accessible website. The cost and quality of healthcare procedures can vary widely among providers. You have a choice in where you receive care. CompareMaine shows the average cost of common healthcare procedures at different facilities in Maine. You can also see patient experience ratings and how Maine hospitals compare on patient safety.

The cost estimates on CompareMaine are median payments. They are meant to serve as a reference point for comparison. In order to find out your actual payment, please contact your insurance company. If you do not have insurance, please contact the facility that you are interested in. When contacted directly, facilities often report their charges which may be higher than the actual payments they receive from insurance companies and patients.

Mainstream health professionals’ stigmatising attitudes towards people with ID: a systematic review

Source: Pelleboer-Gunnink – 2017 – Journal of Intellectual Disability Research – Wiley Online Library

Abstract

Background

Equal access to mainstream healthcare services for people with intellectual disabilities (ID) still requires attention. Although recent studies suggest that health professionals hold positive attitudes towards people with ID, stigmatising attitudes may influence their efforts to serve people with ID in community healthcare practice. To stimulate inclusion in mainstream healthcare services, this systematic review focussed on barriers in attitudes of mainstream health professionals towards people with ID.

Method

Five electronic databases were systematically searched and references in full text articles were checked for studies published in the English language between January 1994 and January 2016. A social–psychological triad of cognitive, affective and behavioural dimensions of stigmatising attitudes is used to structure and discuss the results.

Results

The literature search generated 2190 records with 30 studies that passed our exclusion criteria. Studies were mostly cross-sectional and of moderate quality. With respect to stigma, a lack of familiarity with and knowledge about people with ID was found. ID was considered as a stable condition not under personal control. Moreover, mainstream health professionals had either low or high expectations of the capabilities of people with ID. Professionals reported stress, lack of confidence, fear and anxiety, a tendency to treat people with ID differently and a lack of supporting autonomy.

Conclusions

Stigmatising attitudes towards people with ID appeared to be present among mainstream health professionals. This might affect the ongoing challenges regarding inclusion in mainstream healthcare services. To facilitate inclusion in mainstream healthcare services, it is recommended to include contact and collaboration with experts-by-experience in education programs of health professionals. Future research should progress beyond descriptive accounts of stigma towards exploring relationships between cognitive, affective and behavioural dimensions as pointers for intervention. Finally, inclusion would benefit from an understanding of ‘equal’ treatment that means reasonable adjustments instead of undifferentiated treatment.

Improving diabetes care for people with ID: a qualitative study exploring the perceptions and experiences of professionals in diabetes and ID services

Source: Brown – 2017 – Journal of Intellectual Disability Research – Wiley Online Library

Abstract

Background

Globally, diabetes is increasing with concerns about the impact on outcomes, including premature death and the costs associated with managing the condition. Research indicates that adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) are two to three times more likely to develop diabetes; however, there has been limited focus on diabetes service utilisation in this population. The aim of this study is to explore the perceptions and experiences of diabetes and ID practitioners.

Methods

A series of 1:1 semi-structured interviews were undertaken in one Scottish health service area. In total, 29 qualitative interviews were conducted: 10 with diabetes practitioners from primary and secondary care, 14 from ID services and 5 from community care services regarding diabetes service provision for this population. Thematic content analysis was undertaken to identify the themes and subthemes.

Results

Three main themes were identified: (1) enabling access to services to meet diabetes-related care needs of people with ID; (2) communication and service improvements between staff, patients and across services; and (3) providing person-centred diabetes care and developing adapted resources to increase patient self-care.

Conclusions

The findings of this study have important international implications in how diabetes practitioners plan and deliver services for people with ID and other vulnerable groups with limited cognitive ability and communication skills and difficulties in self-management. The findings highlight that access to diabetes education and adapted resources is needed, and if ‘reasonable adjustments’ are made to service provision and practice, people with ID can benefit from improved healthcare. Developing joint clinics to share knowledge and resources between diabetes and ID practitioners may improve service delivery and continuity of care, and thereby diminish the costs of not providing quality care.

Primary health care for people with an ID: an exploration of consultations, problems identified, and their management in Australia

Source: Primary health care for people with an intellectual disability: an exploration of consultations, problems identified, and their management in Australia

Abstract

Background

People with an intellectual disability (ID) have more complex and different patterns of health care needs than the general population. They experience a greater burden of multi-morbidity, high levels of undetected and unmanaged health issues, and premature mortality than the general population. Primary care has a key role in the health care of people with an ID. Currently, very little is known about the consultation type and length, problems managed, and how general practitioners (GPs) manage these problems for people with an ID compared with the general population. This information would provide valuable insights into how GPs are achieving the health guidelines and facilitating people with an ID to achieve the highest attainable standard of health.

Methods

A secondary analysis of data was collected from January 2003 to December 2012 from the Bettering the Evaluation and Care of Health (BEACH) programme. Consultation type, consultation length in minutes, problem(s) managed during the consultation, medications, treatments provided, and referrals made, pre and post age–sex standardisation, at all GP encounters with people identified in the encounter record as having an ID (‘ID’ encounters, n = 690) were compared with those at ‘non-ID’ encounters (n = 970 641). Statistical significance was tested with 95% confidence intervals.

Results

This study identified significant differences in consultation types, consultation length, problem(s) managed during the consultation, medications, treatments provided, and referrals made at ‘ID’ encounters compared with ‘non-ID’ encounters. ‘ID’ encounters had more indirect encounters, longer consultations, more problems managed, but an under management of common health conditions in people with an ID. Administrative rather than medically related actions dominated clinical treatments for people at ‘ID’ encounters, and they received fewer procedural treatments, referrals to specialists, and medications compared with those at ‘non-ID’ encounters.

Conclusion

The significant differences in consultations, problems identified and managed suggest that GPs may require additional support to (1) identify and manage common medical conditions experienced by people with an ID; (2) manage the increased time required for consultations; and (3) directly consult with people with an ID. Further research is required to determine why GPs managed problems in a significantly different way for people with an ID.

 

“I’m still here”: Exploring what matters to people with intellectual disability during advance care planning – McKenzie

Source: “I’m still here”: Exploring what matters to people with intellectual disability during advance care planning – McKenzie – 2017 – Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities – Wiley Online Library

Abstract

Background

This study sought to identify, from the perspective of people with intellectual disabilities and life limiting conditions, the factors that strengthened and inhibited their Advance Care Planning.

Methods

This in depth qualitative study explored the experiences of four people with intellectual disability and life limiting conditions, through interviews and documentation reviews.

Results

There was strong agreement across all participants about what positively influenced Advance Care Planning, namely; going at my pace; supporting me to make my own choices; adapting the process to suit me, and, most importantly; continuing to support and plan the life I’m still living. With the exception of being comfortable/skilled in end-of-life support, the skills required of facilitators were similar to those required for all forms of person-centred planning.

Conclusion

The findings are encouraging and demonstrate that Advance Care Planning is a useful tool in ensuring that people with intellectual disability have control and choice over their lives, right to the end.

Improving hospital care of patients with intellectual and developmental disabilities – Disability and Health Journal

People with intellectual disabilities and developmental disabilities (IDD) face poorer care and outcomes when hospitalized than patients without IDD. A panel discussion “Hospital care for individuals with IDD: The Issues and Challenges” was held at the Annual Conference of the American Academy of Developmental Medicine and Dentistry, held in Chicago July 8–10, 2016. Among the panelists were representatives from Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, IL and Saint Barnabas Medical Center in Livingston, NJ who discussed efforts to improve hospital care of patients with IDD at their institutions.

Source: Improving hospital care of patients with intellectual and developmental disabilities – Disability and Health Journal

Sarah H. Ailey, PhD RN, Paula J. Brown, MBA, Caitlin M. Ridge, BA, CCLS

Preparing for Life After High School: Characteristics and Experiences of Youth in Special Education

Findings from the National Longitudinal Transition Study 2012. Volume 1: Comparisons with Other Youth (Full Report)

Key Findings: Youth with an IEP are more likely than their peers to be socioeconomically disadvantaged and to face problems with health, communication, and completing typical tasks independently. The vast majority of youth with and without an IEP feel positive about school, but those with an IEP experience bullying and are suspended at higher rates, and are less engaged in school and social activities. Youth with an IEP are more likely than youth without an IEP to struggle academically, yet less likely to

Source: Preparing for Life After High School: The Characteristics and Experiences of Youth in Special Education. Findings from the National Longitudinal Transition Study 2012. Volume 1: Comparisons with Other Youth (Full Report)

Policymakers and educators have long recognized the importance of addressing the needs of youth in special education, who today account for 12 percent of all youth in the United States. Concern that this objective was not being adequately met led Congress to pass landmark legislation in 1975, now known as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) (U.S. Department of Education, 2010). IDEA mandates that children and youth with disabilities have access to a free appropriate public education.

Continue Reading

Data-Driven, Cross-Sector, and Community-Led Transformation: Place-based Population Health

Toward Data-Driven, Cross-Sector, and Community-Led Transformation: Academy Health provides an overview of the findings including the who, the what and the how.
Download Publication

The Community Health Peer Learning Program (CHP), a partnership of AcademyHealth and the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC), conducted an environmental scan of multisector initiatives driving toward population health improvement at the community level, many with a focus on capturing, sharing, integrating, and using data to support their work. The scan and ensuing report confirm the emergence and rapid expansion of such efforts, and reflect a growing recognition that local conditions often drive the environmental and social determinants of health. Many place-based population health improvement efforts, therefore, involve sectors outside of health care (e.g., housing, education, criminal justice), and this report profiles several different programs and strategies designed to build and sustain these cross-sector collaborations. The report also conveys the scale, scope, and diversity of ongoing efforts, and offers insights into common challenges, emerging strategies, and promising practices to accelerate progress.Ultimately, the scan and associated report reveal the emergence of a movement—a convergence of programs and people connecting across traditional and non-traditional boundaries, and working together to improve community health.

Download the Executive Summary above, or click here for the full report.

Source: Toward Data-Driven, Cross-Sector, and Community-Led Transformation: Executive Summary | Academy Health

County Health Rankings & Roadmaps

Source: County Health Rankings & Roadmaps

The annual Rankings provide a revealing snapshot of how health is influenced by where we live, learn, work and play. They provide a starting point for change in communities.
Choose a state from the map to begin.

The County Health Rankings & Roadmaps program helps communities identify and implement solutions that make it easier for people to be healthy in their neighborhoods, schools, and workplaces. Ranking the health of nearly every county in the nation, the County Health Rankings illustrate what we know when it comes to what is keeping people healthy or making people sick and how the opportunity for good health differs from one county to the next. Supporting a call to action, the Roadmaps show what we can do to create healthier places for everyone to live, learn, work, and play. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation collaborates with the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute to bring this program to communities across the nation.

Continue Reading