Nontraditional Careers in Nursing: Options for Nurses

History of Nontraditional Careers

Source: Nontraditional Careers in Nursing: Options for Nurses

Susan E. Lowey, PhD, RN, CHPN

|March 15, 2017

The Nursing Workforce and Changing Demographics

While a majority of nurses currently work in the hospital setting, the nontraditional (nonhospital) nursing sector is growing.[1]

There are currently over 2.7 million registered nurses in the United States.[1] This figure is expected to increase 16% by the year 2024, with nursing employment surpassing the growth of most other health-related occupations.[2] The upcoming expected growth of the aging population, particularly the baby-boomer generation, will require a larger nursing workforce to provide and coordinate care. The increased prevalence of chronic conditions, such as heart disease and diabetes, will also precipitate the need for a larger nursing workforce.[3]

Patients are living longer but often with multiple chronic conditions and functional impairments. While there will always be a need to have a robust nursing workforce within the inpatient hospital setting, future projections show an increased growth of nursing jobs in nonhospital community-based healthcare settings.[4] More patients will require comprehensive outpatient nursing care to manage both acute and chronic conditions.

The function of nurses is to promote wellness through prevention, to restore health and functioning to those affected by illness or injury, and to advocate for the care of individuals, families, and communities.[5] The changing dynamic of the nursing workforce will extend these activities to a wide variety of nonhospital settings.

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Faculty Training Modules: Working with students with disabilities

UCSF Medical Student Disability Services (MSDS) and UCSF Student Disability Services (SDS) in partnership with colleagues from around the country (Case Western Reserve University, Duke University, Northwestern University, Rush University College of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, The University of Washington, and Weill Cornell Medicine and Samuel Merritt University), developed The UCSF Faculty Training Series, an eight part online, video training series to guide faculty who work with students with disabilities. New modules will be posted each month.

The new modules include:
Keeping it Confidential: Guidance for working with students with disabilities
 
                                                           and


Accessible Admissions Practices: Making sure students with disabilities are addressed

Four additional modules are planned for this series including: 
  1. Microaggressions: What they are and how they impact students with disabilities
  2. ADA 101: The basic laws that govern disability services
  3. Accommodations in the Clinical Setting
  4. Full Circle in the Diversity initiative: Inviting Disability to the table

 

Disability Stigma and Your Patients | Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Aging With Physical Disabilities

Source: Disability Stigma and Your Patients | Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Aging With Physical Disabilities

For people with disabilities, stigma can be a major barrier to participation. Stigmatizing attitudes about disabilities can also affect relationships between patients and providers. However, health care providers can be allies with their patients and help reduce the impact of stigma.

Conference | DDNA

Source: Conference | DDNA

“Celebrating our Past, Shaping our Future”

2017 Conference Overview

The 2017 conference theme is “Celebrating our Past, Shaping our Future!”  As the premiere resource for practicing I/DD nurses, DDNA is committed to providing quality education programs that include cutting edge content with practical application.

CONFERENCE PROGRAM STRUCTURE It’s all about the CEs!

DDNA’s 2017 annual conference will be structured a bit differently than in previous years – offering a longer conference program and more accredited continuing education courses and opportunities! The conference registration fee will include 3 ½ full days of conference program and continuing education, offering over 23 hours of continuing education.

As we celebrate our silver anniversary, we would also like to offer our members an additional reason to celebrate with us!   With the longer conference program and additional continuing education, this year’s conference rate is 5% below the 2016 conference fees for comparable hours of continuing education.  The conference will also offer a pre-conference program, providing 6 additional hours of continuing education, available to all conference attendees as an additional purchase!

The result – over 29 hours of continuing education are available with attendance at all conference and pre-conference programs!

Target audience: Health care professionals working in the field of intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Overall objectives: The goals and objectives of the conference are:

  • To present cutting-edge education on the most up-to-date practice issues and research regarding the specialty of developmental disabilities nursing.
  • To provide a forum for networking and to facilitate the sharing of information to improve nursing practice in the developmental disabilities field.
  • To bring together leaders and experts in developmental disabilities to engender consensus that improves the health and lives of persons with developmental disabilities.

Outcomes of “Partnering to Transform Healthcare with People with Disabilities” (PATH-PWD) conference

Research Team Sarah H. Ailey Principal Investigator Rush CON Molly Bathje Co-Investigator Rush CHS Tamar Heller Co-Investigator University of Illinois Award Period 6/1/16 – 5/31/17 Funding Source Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) R13 Conference grant

Source: Partnering to Transform Healthcare with People with Disabllities (PATH-PWD) – Improving Acute, Primary and Transitional Health care with People with Disabilities | | Rush University

On March 23 and 24, 2017, leaders on disability rights and disability health care from around the country gathered at Rush University for the Partnering to Transform Healthcare with People with Disabilities (PATH-PWD) conference sponsored by Rush University and the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Developmental Disabilities and Health, University of Illinois at Chicago. The conference was funded by grants from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) and the Special Hope Foundation.

IASSIDD PowerPoint presentation of the “Tackling Health Disparities and Implementing a Best Practices Healthcare Model: Report from (PATH-PWD) Conference” presented at the American Academy on Developmental Medicine and Dentistry (June 5, 2017).
Sarah H Ailey PhD RN APHN-BC CDDN, Tamar Heller, PhD, & Molly Bathje, PhD, OTR/L

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White Paper on Inclusion of Students with Disabilities in Nursing Educational Programs for the California Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities (CCEPD)

Marks, B. & Ailey, S. (2014). White Paper on Inclusion of Students with Disabilities in Nursing Educational Programs for the California Committee on the Employment of People with Disabilities. Chicago, IL. Featured on The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) website: Accommodating Students with Disabilities (https://tinyurl.com/ov6tlec).

A White Paper on Inclusion of Students with Disabilities in Nursing Educational Programs is available on the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) website. This paper also presents a new model of technical standards inclusive of all students with and without  disabilities.

ABSTRACT: Nurses  are  challenged  to  fill  the  new  and  expanded  roles  for  a  health  care  system  designed  to improve the quality  of  health  care.  Despite  the  unique  perspective  and  set  of  skills  that students and health professionals with disabilities have to address many of these challenges, people  with  disabilities  are  often effectively  excluded from  the  nursing  profession. The purposes of this white paper are to 1) frame the issues that prevent applicants with disabilities from entering nursing education and the nursing profession and 2) propose the changes necessary to engage the potential of people with disabilities to enhance nursing leadership and innovation  necessary  to transform  health  care.  Major  barriers  include  the  following: 1) outmoded admission standards that deter applicants with disabilities; 2) misconceptions about the capacity of students with disabilities to function effectively in the clinical components of nursing education; and, 3) lack of a comprehensive understanding of issues related to patient safety. This paper begins with an historical overview of the journey toward the acceptance of nurses with disabilities, including civil rights legislation, judicial rulings with reference to specific landmark cases, and the development of current technical and educational standards. The paper also presents a new model of technical standards inclusive of all students with and without  disabilities, along with recommendations  supportive  of  students with  disabilities  in admission, matriculation and graduation from nursing programs.


Additional Resources

  1. A New Model of Technical Standards
  1. White Paper on Inclusion of Students with Disabilities in Nursing Educational Programs
  1. ADAAA and Accommodations



Citation:
Marks, B & Ailey, S. A. (2014) White Paper on Inclusion of Students with Disabilities in Nursing Educational Programs. Sacramento, CA: California Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities (CCEPD).