Responsive Practice Providing Health Care & Screenings to Individuals with Disabilities

The Responsive Practice training is online, on-demand, free for a limited time, and eligible for continuing education & continuing medical education credits. Responsive Practice enhances health care providers’ ability to deliver culturally competent, accessible care to people with intellectual, mobility, and other disabilities. Learning objectives:

  • Describe disparities in health experienced by people with disabilities compared to people without disabilities;
  • Recognize barriers to accessing health care & preventive services; and
  • Acquire strategies & approaches to provide disability-competent,responsive care.

Nurses

Southern NH AHEC is an Approved Provider of continuing nursing education by the Northeast Multistate Division (NE-MSD), an accredited approver of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

Physicians

Southern NH AHEC, accredited by the NH Medical Society, designates this live activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s). Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

1.0 contact hours. Activity Number: 1226

Responsive Practice Training Flyer 2018

Internet and cell phone usage patterns among young adults with intellectual disabilities

Source: JARID

Authors Cristina Jenaro, Noelia Flores, Maribel Cruz, Ma Carmen Pérez, Vanessa Vega, Víctor A Torres

First published: 24 July 2017

Abstract

Background

The risks and opportunities associated with the use of technologies are of growing research interest. Patterns of technology usage illuminate these opportunities and risks. However, no studies have assessed the usage patterns (frequency, duration, and intensity) and related factors in young people with intellectual disabilities.

Methods

Questionnaires on Internet and cell phone usage patterns, the Internet Over-Use Scale and the Cell-Phone Over-Use Scale, as well as the Beck Depression Inventory were filled out in one-on-one interviews of 216 youth with intellectual disabilities.

Results

Young people with disabilities make more social and recreational rather than educational use of these tools, and show higher rates of excessive use of both technologies than a comparison group of 410 young people without disabilities. Also, their overuse is associated with other unhealthy behaviors.

Conclusion

The framework of support needs of people with disabilities should be considered to promote healthy Internet and cell phone use.