Top 10 Changes to Medicaid Under House Republicans’ ACA Repeal Bill

Source: Top 10 Changes to Medicaid Under House Republicans’ ACA Repeal Bill

Executive Summary

Following the CBO score that found the House Republicans’ so-called “American Health Care Act” would cause 24 million people to lose health care coverage, NHeLP managing attorneys examine the bill’s “draconian changes” planned for Medicaid. Managing Attorney of the DC Office Mara Youdelman and Managing Attorney of the LA office Kim Lewis conclude that cutting $880 billion in federal funding and 14 million individuals off Medicaid “creates significant financial hardship for states and is devastating for low-income people everywhere. No one can afford these changes.”

Reaching People in Multiple Languages

Source: Reaching People in Multiple Languages

The National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD) envisions an America in which all populations will have an equal opportunity to live long, healthy, and productive lives. NIMHD is committed to supporting research and communications efforts to improve cultural competency and health literacy. We offer this portal as a resource to our stakeholders who work with health disparity populations with limited English proficiency (LEP) to help improve language access to health information produced by NIH and other federal agencies.

How NIMHD Plans to Reach People in Multiple Languages

Dr. Pérez-Stable: Bridging Health Gaps through Language Access

Health Information in Multiple Languages

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National Rehabilitation Information Center | Information for Independence

People with disabilities may have more complex healthcare needs than people without disabilities. Receiving regular healthcare can help people with disabilities avoid preventable health problems, but they may have difficulty getting necessary medical or dental care. Their health insurance may not cover all of their needs, or they may encounter other barriers such as a lack of transportation to get to the doctor’s office. As a result, they might put off or skip getting necessary care putting them at risk for expensive health emergencies. In a recent NIDILRR-funded study, researchers looked at how commonly working-age adults with and without disabilities delayed or skipped needed healthcare services. The researchers wanted to find out if community-dwelling, working-age adults with disabilities were more likely to skip needed care than those without disabilities, even if they had insurance. The researchers also wanted to see if people with certain types of disabilities or health issues were more likely to skip needed care than people with other types of disabilities, and what the reasons were for delaying or skipping care.

Source: National Rehabilitation Information Center | Information for Independence

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Why Increasing Numbers of Physicians with Disability Could Improve Care for Patients with Disability, Oct 16 – AMA Journal of Ethics

Expanding the numbers of physicians with disabilities would facilitate patient-centered care for those who need similar accommodations. AMA Journal of Ethics is a monthly bioethics journal published by the American Medical Association.

Source: Why Increasing Numbers of Physicians with Disability Could Improve Care for Patients with Disability, Oct 16 – AMA Journal of Ethics

Lisa I. Iezzoni, MD, MSc

Abstract

Erroneous assumptions among health care professionals about the daily lives, preferences, values, and expectations of persons with disability can contribute to documented health care disparities, faulty communication, and substandard quality of care affecting this heterogeneous population. Efforts to reduce racial and ethnic disparities have focused on expanding diversity in the physician workforce. Would expanding the numbers of physicians with disability benefit patients with disability? Increasing the number of physicians who identify as “disabled” is one strategy for proactively confronting disability-related barriers affecting patients, but such efforts will likely face substantial challenges. Nonetheless, physicians who require accommodations to practice (e.g., a height-adjustable examination table) could plausibly benefit patients needing similar accommodations and perhaps be well-positioned to provide patient-centered care to persons with comparable disability.

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Community Outreach Collaboratives | National Disability Navigator Resource Collaborative

Community Outreach Collaboratives The NDNRC has funded eighteen Community Outreach Collaboratives (COCs) for the third year of open enrollment – expanding on the eleven COCs who were funded in year two. The COCs will increase collaborations in the community, dissemination and outreach efforts and enrollment of people with disabilities in the ACA. The COCs have two primary tasks: 1) build cross-disability collaborations with other disability organizations; and 2) have the cross-disability collaboration work

Source: Community Outreach Collaboratives | National Disability Navigator Resource Collaborative

Disability Stigma and Your Patients | Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Aging With Physical Disabilities

Source: Disability Stigma and Your Patients | Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Aging With Physical Disabilities

For people with disabilities, stigma can be a major barrier to participation. Stigmatizing attitudes about disabilities can also affect relationships between patients and providers. However, health care providers can be allies with their patients and help reduce the impact of stigma.

Transition of Young Adults with Developmental Disabilities to Adult-Systems of Care

2017/03/16
2pm – 3pm CST

REGISTER HERE

Presented by: Kruti Acharya, MD

Dr. Acharya will review the most recent data about health care transition for adolescents and young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). During the webinar, she will describe standard of care for health care transition and highlight strategies to support the transition to adult-centered health care for this population.

Dr. Acharya is a board certified developmental and behavioral pediatrician and internist at the University of Illinois at Chicago and the director of the Illinois Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental Disabilities (LEND) Program. Dr. Acharya cares for individuals with developmental disabilities using a lifespan perspective from childhood to adulthood. She is particularly interested in supporting adolescents and young adults with developmental disabilities as they transition to adult-systems of care and beyond.

Lessons in Increasing Access to Care: Symposium at Rush brings together disability and health care leaders

https://www.rush.edu/news/lessons-increasing-access-care

By Kevin McKeough, Anne Burgeson & Kathleen Ziemer

Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan observed that “at almost any moment, any of us could be living with a disability, whether through our life circumstances or as we age. This is an issue that is personal to all of us, whether we realize it our not.”

Madigan the was the featured speaker at the Rush ADA 25 Symposium, held on Oct. 6 at Rush University Medical Center. The event celebrated the 25th anniversary of the Americans With Disabilities Act, which became law on July 26, 1990.

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Lessons in Increasing Access to Care: Symposium at Rush brings together disability and health care leaders

https://www.rush.edu/news/lessons-increasing-access-care

By Kevin McKeough, Anne Burgeson and Kathleen Ziemer

Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan observed that “at almost any moment, any of us could be living with a disability, whether through our life circumstances or as we age. This is an issue that is personal to all of us, whether we realize it our not.”

Madigan the was the featured speaker at the Rush ADA 25 Symposium, held on Oct. 6 at Rush University Medical Center. The event celebrated the 25th anniversary of the Americans With Disabilities Act, which became law on July 26, 1990.

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