Improving hospital care of patients with intellectual and developmental disabilities – Disability and Health Journal

People with intellectual disabilities and developmental disabilities (IDD) face poorer care and outcomes when hospitalized than patients without IDD. A panel discussion “Hospital care for individuals with IDD: The Issues and Challenges” was held at the Annual Conference of the American Academy of Developmental Medicine and Dentistry, held in Chicago July 8–10, 2016. Among the panelists were representatives from Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, IL and Saint Barnabas Medical Center in Livingston, NJ who discussed efforts to improve hospital care of patients with IDD at their institutions.

Source: Improving hospital care of patients with intellectual and developmental disabilities – Disability and Health Journal

Sarah H. Ailey, PhD RN, Paula J. Brown, MBA, Caitlin M. Ridge, BA, CCLS

Preparing for Life After High School: Characteristics and Experiences of Youth in Special Education

Findings from the National Longitudinal Transition Study 2012. Volume 1: Comparisons with Other Youth (Full Report)

Key Findings: Youth with an IEP are more likely than their peers to be socioeconomically disadvantaged and to face problems with health, communication, and completing typical tasks independently. The vast majority of youth with and without an IEP feel positive about school, but those with an IEP experience bullying and are suspended at higher rates, and are less engaged in school and social activities. Youth with an IEP are more likely than youth without an IEP to struggle academically, yet less likely to

Source: Preparing for Life After High School: The Characteristics and Experiences of Youth in Special Education. Findings from the National Longitudinal Transition Study 2012. Volume 1: Comparisons with Other Youth (Full Report)

Policymakers and educators have long recognized the importance of addressing the needs of youth in special education, who today account for 12 percent of all youth in the United States. Concern that this objective was not being adequately met led Congress to pass landmark legislation in 1975, now known as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) (U.S. Department of Education, 2010). IDEA mandates that children and youth with disabilities have access to a free appropriate public education.

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Data-Driven, Cross-Sector, and Community-Led Transformation: Place-based Population Health

Toward Data-Driven, Cross-Sector, and Community-Led Transformation: Academy Health provides an overview of the findings including the who, the what and the how.
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The Community Health Peer Learning Program (CHP), a partnership of AcademyHealth and the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC), conducted an environmental scan of multisector initiatives driving toward population health improvement at the community level, many with a focus on capturing, sharing, integrating, and using data to support their work. The scan and ensuing report confirm the emergence and rapid expansion of such efforts, and reflect a growing recognition that local conditions often drive the environmental and social determinants of health. Many place-based population health improvement efforts, therefore, involve sectors outside of health care (e.g., housing, education, criminal justice), and this report profiles several different programs and strategies designed to build and sustain these cross-sector collaborations. The report also conveys the scale, scope, and diversity of ongoing efforts, and offers insights into common challenges, emerging strategies, and promising practices to accelerate progress.Ultimately, the scan and associated report reveal the emergence of a movement—a convergence of programs and people connecting across traditional and non-traditional boundaries, and working together to improve community health.

Download the Executive Summary above, or click here for the full report.

Source: Toward Data-Driven, Cross-Sector, and Community-Led Transformation: Executive Summary | Academy Health

How to Bounce Back – Aging with a Disability Factsheet Series

Source: How to Bounce Back | Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Aging With Physical Disabilities

How to Bounce Back – Aging with a Disability Factsheet Series

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Living with a disability can be stressful at times. Resilience is a term that describes how we cope with stress. By building up our resilience, we can stay more engaged in life.

What Is Resilience?

Resilience describes our ability to bounce back and keep going after a stressful experience. Different people define resilience in different ways. When we asked people with disabilities to describe resilience in their own words, some descriptions included:

  • Bouncing back, or being “buoyant.”
  • “Rolling with” or “dancing with” a disability.
  • Taking things one day at a time, while also planning for the future.
  • Finding a “new normal” as life changes.
  • Making the best of life with a disability.
  • Trusting that stressful times will pass, like the weather.

No Wrong Door No Wrong Door Systems (Aging and Disability Resource Centers)

No Wrong Door

Source: No Wrong Door

This paper provides concrete examples of how seven No Wrong Door Systems—sometimes called Aging and Disability Resource Centers—are promoting person- and family-centered practice. No Wrong Door Systems involve an array of organizations including Area Agencies on Aging, Centers for Independent Living, and state agencies such as Medicaid agencies and state units on aging. Older adults, people with disabilities, and their families can access services through these agencies in a variety of ways including in person, by telephone, and online.

Individualization is at the heart of person- and family-centered practice. It is an essential component of No Wrong Door Systems, allowing people to have information about their options and facilitate decision making based on individual and family preferences, values, and financial resources. The paper includes a toolkit of resources and contacts for states to learn more and even replicate these practices. A checklist—specifically created for this project—provides a roadmap for states to ensure that No Wrong Door Systems operate in a person- and family-centered way.

This paper is the first in a series of promising practices and emerging innovations reports. This series is a new feature of the upcoming, 3rd Long-Term Services and Supports (LTSS) Scorecard. The LTSS Scorecard—written by the AARP Public Policy Institute and funded by The SCAN Foundation and The Commonwealth Fund—measures state-level performance of LTSS systems that assist older people, adults with disabilities, and their family caregivers.

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Waivers of Medicaid Requirements – A Quick Review

Executive Summary

In a companion piece to Background to Medicaid and Section 1115 of the Social Security Act, Legal Director Jane Perkins and Managing Attorney of the DC office Mara Youdelman provide a brief review of how certain Medicaid requirements may be waived. They conclude, in part, that “Section 1115 of the Social Security Act gives the Secretary of HHS limited authority to approve Medicaid waivers.”

Defending Medicaid

Medicaid’s guaranteed-enrollment for those who meet eligibility requirements makes the program vulnerable to attacks at both the federal and state levels.  NHeLP actively defends Medicaid against these threats, protects the rights of beneficiaries to receive the services to which to which they are legally entitled and works to ensure that states meet their obligations under the Medicaid Act.

NHeLP’s Protect Medicaid Webinar Series

Proposals to drastically cut federal Medicaid spending through per capita caps and block grants would fundamentally alter and undermine Medicaid. NHeLP’s Protect Medicaid webinar series examines the harmful impact of these proposals on key features of the Medicaid program, including: services and benefits geared for vulnerable populations; affordability and cost sharing protections; advances under the ACA’s low income adult expansion; and consumer protections and due process guarantees.

Click the links to watch the videos, which will appear in a new window.

Click to download PDFs:

 

Click on the links below to register for these upcoming webinars:
Friday, April 7
Noon-1 p.m. EDT – Section 1115 authority

Friday, April 28
2 p.m. EDT – Rulemaking, Agency Authority, and the Administrative Procedures Act – An Overview

A Young Person’s Guide to Health Care Transition | NCWD/Youth

Source: A Young Person’s Guide to Health Care Transition | NCWD/Youth

A Young-Persons-Guide-to-Health-Care-Transition is about making the transition from pediatric to adult health care. This brief will review topics youth should consider around transitioning to adult health care, living a healthy lifestyle, and paying for health care. Youth need to be a part of conversations about health care. Most youth rely on their parents to handle decisions about their health care and health coverage. Before you know it, you may be expected to make these decisions on your own, if you are not doing so already. This brief will provide some information and help you think about ways you can start planning now for your transition from pediatric to adult health care.

Taking charge of your health care transition goes hand in hand with helping you achieve your career and life goals. Managing your health and wellness as a young person is the first step necessary for going to school, transitioning to work, and living the life you want. To make your dreams and career goals a reality, start learning about your health, health insurance, and health care transition planning at a young age. Make it a habit to manage your health and well-being as a young person, and you will carry this skill throughout your life.

Download the PDF

New 2017 Transition Coding and Reimbursement Tip Sheet Available

Got Transition and the American Academy of Pediatrics released a new 2017 Transition Coding and Reimbursement Tipsheet 2017 to support the delivery of recommended transition services in pediatric and adult primary and specialty care settings. The new tip sheet includes a list of updated transition-related CPT codes, including the new code for transition readiness assessment, and current Medicare fees and RVUs for these services.  It also includes a new set of seven clinical vignettes with recommended CPT and ICD-10 codes. HERE for the tip sheet.

National Center on Improving Literacy

Evidence-based resources for improving outcomes for students with literacy-related disabilities, including dyslexia.

About Us

The National Center on Improving Literacy is a partnership among literacy experts, university researchers, and technical assistance providers, with funding from the United States Department of Education.

Our Mission

To increase access to, and use of, evidence-based approaches to screen, identify, and teach students with literacy-related disabilities, including dyslexia. Download our handout.