Disability Rights – National Health Law Program

Medicaid provides health coverage and protections for persons with physical, intellectual and developmental disabilities. NHeLP works with state health advocates and litigates when necessary to protect the rights of vulnerable persons, making sure persons with disabilities receive the care they need and are legally entitled to, as well as protecting their rights when care is denied, terminated or reduced without notice or a hearing.

Source: Disability Rights – National Health Law Program

 

Promoting sexuality across the life span for individuals with IDD

Ailey, SA, Marks, B, Crisp, C, Hahn, JE. (2003). Promoting sexuality across the life span for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, Nurs Clin N Am 38, 229–252.

“No group in this country faces the sort of sexual and reproductive restrictions disabled people do: we are frequently prevented from marrying, bearing and/or rearing children, learning about sexuality, having sexual relationships and having access to sexual literature . . . [sexual] confusion arises as a consequence of society forcing us to internalize the notion that we are sexually inferior. This conspiracy, which society manufactures by way of discriminatory social policies which lead to our sexual subjugation, is keeping us in a state of sexual self-hate. I believe that this is done tacitly to keep us from doing the thing that poses an overwhelming threat to our disability-phobic society: taking their sons and daughters as sexual and life partners, bearing their grandchildren. If I sound full of rage to you, you’re reading me correctly, I am outraged.” —Barbara Faye Waxman, 1991, p. 85–6 [1]

Promoting sexuality across the life span for individuals with IDD – 2003

http://www.nursing.theclinics.com/article/S0029-6465(02)00072-5/abstract

Study finds $200 billion in avoidable health care costs | American Pharmacists Association

Source: Study finds $200 billion in avoidable health care costs | American Pharmacists Association

Medication misuse, non-adherence, errors contribute to wasteful spending

Health care costs caused by improper and unnecessary use of medications exceeded $200 billion in 2012, amounting to an estimated 10 million hospital admissions, 78 million outpatient treatments, 246 million prescriptions, and 4 million emergency department visits annually, according to a new report from the IMS Institute for Healthcare Informatics.

This amount, representing 8% of the nation’s health care spending that year, “could pay for the health care of more than 24 million currently uninsured U.S. citizens,” said Murray Aitken, IMS Executive Director, in a news release announcing the report, Avoidable Costs in U.S. Healthcare: The $200 Billion Opportunity from Using Medicines More Responsibly.

These avoidable costs arose when patients failed to receive the right medications at the right time or in the right way, or received them but failed to take them, according to the report. Improvement is necessary in six areas: medication nonadherence, lag in adoption of evidence-based treatment practice, misuse of antibiotics, medication errors, suboptimal use of generics, and mismanaged polypharmacy in older adults.

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Medicaid Restructuring Under the American Health Care Act and Nonelderly Adults with Disabilities | The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation

Medicaid covers more than three in 10 non-elderly adults with disabilities, providing a broad range of medical and long-term care services that enable people with disabilities to live and work in the community.

Source: Medicaid Restructuring Under the American Health Care Act and Nonelderly Adults with Disabilities | The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation

Key Takeaways
This brief describes Medicaid’s role for nearly 7 million nonelderly adults with disabilities living in the community to help inform the debate about the American Health Care Act’s proposals to end enhanced federal funding under the ACA and reduce federal Medicaid funding under a per capita cap.Medicaid covers more than three in 10 nonelderly adults with disabilities, providing a broad range of medical and long-term care services that enable people with disabilities to live and work in the community. 

  • Over half of nonelderly Medicaid adults with disabilities live below the federal poverty level, and nearly 85% have incomes below 200% of poverty ($24,120/year for an individual in 2017).
  • Nonelderly Medicaid adults with disabilities are four times as likely to receive nursing or other health care at home, more than 2.5 times as likely to have three or more functional limitations, and more than 1.5 times as likely to have 10 or more health care visits in a year compared to people with disabilities who are privately insured.

People with disabilities account for 15% of total Medicaid enrollment but 42% of program spending due to their greater health needs and more intensive service use.   

Medicaid spending per enrollee for people with disabilities is substantially higher than for those without disabilities, due to their greater health needs and reliance on Medicaid for expensive but necessary services, especially long-term care in the community and nursing homes, that are generally unavailable through private insurance and too costly to afford out-of-pocket.  Medicaid spending per enrollee for people with disabilities also varies substantially by state (from $10,142 in AL to $33,808 in NY in 2011).

Nonelderly adults with disabilities may be particularly affected by Medicaid changes in the American Health Care Act (AHCA), including the fundamental shift to per capita capped financing.

  • Most Medicaid disability-related coverage pathways and community-based long-term care services are provided at state option, making them subject to cuts as states adjust to substantial federal funding reductions under a per capita cap.  The CBO estimates that the AHCA will reduce Medicaid spending by $880 billion from 2017 to 2026.
  • The AHCA also would end enhanced federal funding for the ACA’s Medicaid expansion, which covers some nonelderly adults with disabilities, and Community First Choice attendant care services for people with disabilities, which could jeopardize states’ ability to continue to finance these options.

Draft Principles for a Person-Centered Approach to Serious or Advanced Illness

Deadline: May 12, 2017

http://ltcombudsman.org/uploads/files/support/acl-person-centered-principles.pdf
ACL, in consultation with stakeholders from the aging and disability communities, has drafted a set of principles to guide their work, and to enhance existing programs and services related to serious or advanced illness for older adults and people with disabilities. ACL is now seeking input from the people they serve-older adults, people with dementia, people with all types of disabilities, and families and caregivers, as well as partners in the aging and disability networks.  The Draft Principles for a Person-Centered Approach to Serious or Advanced Illness is available here. Send your comments, by May 12, 2017, to AdvancedIllness@acl.hhs.gov.

Women’s Refugee Commission – Disabilities

Source: Women’s Refugee Commission – Disabilities

As many as 7.7 million of the world’s 51 million people displaced by conflict have disabilities. People with disabilities are among the most hidden and neglected of all displaced people, excluded from or unable to access most aid programs because of physical and social barriers or because of negative attitudes and biases. They are often not identified when aid agencies and organizations collect data and assess needs during and after a humanitarian disaster. They are more likely to be forgotten when health and support services are provided. Often, refugees with disabilities are more isolated following their displacement than when they were in their home communities.

Key Reports & Resources

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Women’s Refugee Commission – Maternal & Newborn Health and Disability

Source: Women’s Refugee Commission – Maternal & Newborn Health

Worldwide, more than 350,000 women die every year from complications related to pregnancy and childbirth—that’s nearly one every minute. For women affected by conflict or disaster, who are displaced from their homes and communities, the risk of maternal death or injury is especially high. In fact, over 60 percent of the world’s maternal deaths occur in 10 countries, nine of which are currently experiencing or emerging from conflict. With the breakdown of traditional social structures during times of war or conflict, women face an increased threat of sexual abuse, exploitation and violence. And sexual violence puts them at high risk of unwanted pregnancies and unsafe abortions, especially since they often lack access to emergency contraception and emergency care for pregnancy and childbirth complications.

Access to quality health services can mean the difference between life and death. In crisis settings, this access is particularly limited, increasing the risk of maternal death, the main causes of which are: hemorrhage, unsafe abortions, high blood pressure or prolonged and obstructed labor without access to cesarean section. The lack of access to health care also raises the risk of newborn death, usually caused by preterm birth, infection or asphyxia (lack of oxygen) during childbirth. However, there are several steps that can be taken to prevent maternal and newborn death. Training attendants to assist mothers during childbirth and making cesarean section readily available can prevent mothers and their infants from dying needlessly.


Parental Rights Toolkit

  1. ICE-Directive-Parents-Guide-ICE-Version-2014-EN
  2. ICE-Directive-Parents-Guide-ICE-Version-2014-ES
  3. ICE-s-Parental-Interests-Directive
  4. Parental Rights Report Spanish
  5. Parental Rights Report-Final
  6. Parental Rights-Make-A-Plan-June-2014-Spanish
  7. Parental-Rights-Toolkit-ENGLISH_web
  8. Parental-Rights-Toolkit-ENGLISH-Interactive
  9. Parental-Toolkit-SPANISH_Interactive
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Disability Rights Consortium At Equip For Equality – Immigration And Disability

Host: Equip for Equality

When

Wednesday, March 22, 2017 –

9:30am to 11:00am

Where

Equip for Equality
20 North Michigan Avenue, Suite 300
Chicago, IL60602

Description

Lisa Palumbo and Audra Passinault from LAF will be our featured speakers to discuss the intersection between immigration and disability. Specifically, they will address the recent Executive Orders and Implementation Memoranda of the current administration and how these policies may affect persons with disabilities. Given the heightened focus on immigration issues recently, this should be a very timely and useful presentation. The meeting will be at Equip for Equality (20 N. Michigan, Suite 300) from 9:30-11:00. The session will be eligible for 1.5 hours of Continuing Legal Education Credit. A captioner will be at the meeting. If you need an additional accommodation to participate, contact Barry Taylor at barryt@equipforequality.org by 3/17. If you can’t attend in person, you can participate via teleconference by calling 800-910-8278 and entering code: 1940990.

Handouts

  1. Frequently Asked Questions on Immigration
  2. Immigrant Detention Centers in Illinois
  3. Immigration and Disability Presentation 3-22-17_ppt
  4. Know Your Healthcare Rights for Undocumented People – English
  5. Know Your Healthcare Rights for Undocumented People – Spanish