Resources | Protect Our Care IL

Source: Resources | Protect Our Care IL

Protect Our Care – Illinois is a statewide coalition of health care advocates, providers, consumers, and workers, joining together to prevent the repeal of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), prevent disastrous changes to Medicaid, and protect and expand access to quality affordable health care. We know the crusade to undermine the ACA is not over whether there is a repeal vote this week, next week, or next year, so Protect Our Care – Illinois invites you to join Illinoisans across the state to defend access to quality affordable health care for all.

Protect Our Care materials

Knowledge and expectations of direct support professionals towards effects of psychotropic drug use in people with ID

To achieve sufficient collaboration of intellectual disability support professionals in reducing inappropriate psychotropic drug use of clients, vocational educational training is needed.

Source: Knowledge and expectations of direct support professionals towards effects of psychotropic drug use in people with intellectual disabilities – Kuijper – 2017 – Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities – Wiley Online Library

Abstract

Background/Introduction

In this study, we investigated intellectual disability support professionals’ knowledge and expectations towards effects of psychotropic drug use on behaviour and drug use in their clients, because shortcomings may lead to misinterpretations of behavioural symptoms and inappropriate drug use.

Methods

Two self-designed questionnaires were used to measure the knowledge and expectations of 194 support professionals in 14 residential facilities regarding psychotropic drug use and effects of antipsychotics on behavioural, cognitive and mental functioning of people with intellectual disability. The psychometric properties of both questionnaires were adequate.

Results

A majority of the professionals had unrealistic expectations regarding the positive effects of antipsychotics on cognitive and behavioural functioning, and 94% scored below the cut-off scores regarding knowledge; 60% indicated they needed education and training.

Conclusions

To achieve sufficient collaboration of intellectual disability support professionals in reducing inappropriate psychotropic drug use of clients, vocational educational training is needed.

Pain and pain assessment in people with ID

Pain and pain assessment in people with intellectual disability: Issues and challenges in practice

Source: Pain and pain assessment in people with intellectual disability: Issues and challenges in practice – Doody – 2017 – British Journal of Learning Disabilities – Wiley Online Library

Accessible summary

  • Pain is difficult to identify when people cannot communicate.
  • If pain is not identified, it cannot be managed and causes stress.
  • Pain assessment is essential in order to identify pain.
  • Pain assessment requires a combination of knowledge, health assessments and observations.

Abstract

Background

Individuals with intellectual disability experience the same chronic diseases and conditions as the general population, but are more likely to have physical and psychological co-morbidities, resulting in a higher risk of experiencing pain and having more frequent or severe pain.

Method

This position paper aims to highlight the importance of pain assessment for people with intellectual disability.

Results

As people with intellectual disability live within the community and/or remain in the family home, they are accessing a wide range of healthcare services. This necessitates that nurses across all care settings are knowledgeable regarding appropriate/alternative pain assessment methods for people with intellectual disability. While many pain assessment tools are available for use with the intellectual disability population, they are often not well established or infrequently used to establish their validity.

Conclusion

Although self-report is the gold standard in pain assessment, pain assessment for people with intellectual disability is often challenging as they may be unable to self-report their pain due to their levels of communication or cognitive ability. Assessment requires a combination of approaches amalgamating: pain assessment, health assessment and observation of behaviours.

The Impact of Health Reform Repeal on Employment

Use this interactive map to see the state-by-state impact of repeal of federal health reform on jobs.

Source: The Impact of Health Reform Repeal on Employment – The Commonwealth Fund

Contrary to a common misconception that health reform law has been a “job killer,” this study shows that repeal of these policies may cause major job losses and economic dislocation in every state -even in states that have not expanded their Medicaid programs.

While health reform repeal would dramatically increase the number of uninsured and harm access to health care, particularly for low- and moderate-income Americans, this analysis demonstrates that the consequences could be broader and extend well beyond the health care system. Repeal could trigger major reductions in employment and substantial losses in state economic activity and state and local revenues.

While health reform repeal would dramatically increase the number of uninsured and harm access to health care, particularly for low- and moderate-income Americans, this analysis demonstrates that the consequences could be broader and extend well beyond the health care system. Repeal could trigger major reductions in employment and substantial losses in state economic activity and state and local revenues.

Hover over states to see the impact of repeal of premium tax credits and Medicaid expansion on jobs.

Or click to download a state profile available under the map.

Impact of Health Reform Repeal-US Map
Impact of Health Reform Repeal-US Map

Daphne Ron: Good and Bad Experiences with Health Care

Watch Daphne Ron’s Presentation Good and Bad Experiences with Health Care

TRANSCRIPT: Daphne Ron Presentation Good and Bad Experiences with Health Care

Self advocate Daphne Ron discusses the good and bad experiences she has had with health care during the “Partnering to Transform Healthcare with People with Disabilities (PATH-PWD) – Improving Acute, Primary and Transitional Health care with People with Disabilities” conference March 23-24, 2017 at Rush University. This conference was a collaboration between Rush and the RRTC-DD and Health which was funded by AHRQ.

Improving Your Person and Family Engagement Metrics in TCPI | Patient-Centered Primary Care Collaborative

Source: Improving Your Person and Family Engagement Metrics in TCPI | Patient-Centered Primary Care Collaborative

The Patient Centered Primary Care Collaborative Support and Alignment Network (PCPCC SAN) was created to assist staff and leaders in Practice Transformation Networks, along with enrolled clinicians, to successfully transform their practices to deliver person and family centered care. In 2017 the TCPI is adopting 6 measures of person and family engagement (PFE).  On this page, we describe the measures and offer links to websites where you can download tools, information, and other educational materials.

“Bite Sized” Exercises and Discussion Prompts to Reinforce Culture

Questions to ask your doctor about patient-centered care

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Atlas on the Primary Care of Adults with Developmental Disabilities in Ontario

Download: Atlas on the Primary Care of Adults with Developmental Disabilities in Ontario

Source: ICES

Lunsky Y, Klein-Geltink JE, Yates EA, editors. December 2013

The Issue

Ontario’s Action Plan for Health Care focuses on becoming healthier, with improved access to integrated family/primary care and a major emphasis on the provision of the right care at the right time and in the right place. These priorities are particularly relevant to individuals with developmental disabilities: research from other jurisdictions would suggest that they have higher rates of preventable diseases, greater challenges obtaining guideline-recommended primary care3 and higher associated health care costs.4 However, the health status and

health care of adults with developmental disabilities have not been well studied in Ontario, due to the absence of population-based data. The work of the Health Care Access Research and Developmental Disabilities (H-CARDD) Program is in direct response to Ontario’s call to action through addressing this data gap. The first H-CARDD project, conducted in partnership with decision makers and clinicians from the health and social services sectors, has focused on primary care.

The Study

The Atlas on the Primary Care of Adults with Developmental Disabilities in Ontario provides, for the first time in Canada, descriptive information on the health of adults with developmental disabilities in Ontario and examines the quality of their primary care relative to adults without developmental disabilities. Findings have relevance in Ontario and in other jurisdictions where there is interest in improving health care and the health status of those with developmental disabilities.

Revised ACA Repeal and Replace Bill Likely to Increase the Uninsured Rate and Health Insurance Costs for Many

House Republicans are close to agreeing on an amended version of the American Health Care Act, their proposed repeal and replacement of the Affordable Care Act. David Blumenthal, M.D., and Sara Collins say that, based on the summaries circulated by the media, the revised bill will significantly increase the numbers of uninsured Americans while raising insurance costs for many of the nation’s most vulnerable citizens. At the same time, the bill’s restructuring of the Medicaid program is likely to hurt state economies and enrollees.

Source: Revised ACA Repeal and Replace Bill Likely to Increase the Uninsured Rate and Health Insurance Costs for Many – The Commonwealth Fund

News outlets report that House Republicans are close to agreeing on an amended version of the American Health Care Act (AHCA), their proposed repeal and replacement of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The all-important legislative language for the revised bill is not yet available, nor are Congressional Budget Office (CBO) projections of its effects on coverage and the budget, so any analyses are necessarily tentative.

Nevertheless, the summaries leaked to the media offer insight on the amended bill. If accurate, those summaries suggest that the revised AHCA will significantly increase the numbers of uninsured Americans, raise the cost of insurance for many of the nation’s most vulnerable citizens, and, as originally proposed in the AHCA, cut and reconfigure the Medicaid program. The new amendment specifically allows states to weaken consumer protections by, for example, permitting insurers to charge people with preexisting conditions higher premiums.

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CompareMaine

CompareMaine shows the average cost of common healthcare procedures at different facilities in Maine. You can also see patient experience ratings and how Maine hospitals compare on patient safety.

Source: CompareMaine

more information. better decisions.

Compare Costs of Healthcare Procedures and Quality of Care Across Maine

The Maine Health Data Organization, in collaboration with the Maine Quality Forum, is required by law to promote the transparency of healthcare cost and quality information via a publicly accessible website. The cost and quality of healthcare procedures can vary widely among providers. You have a choice in where you receive care. CompareMaine shows the average cost of common healthcare procedures at different facilities in Maine. You can also see patient experience ratings and how Maine hospitals compare on patient safety.

The cost estimates on CompareMaine are median payments. They are meant to serve as a reference point for comparison. In order to find out your actual payment, please contact your insurance company. If you do not have insurance, please contact the facility that you are interested in. When contacted directly, facilities often report their charges which may be higher than the actual payments they receive from insurance companies and patients.

Mainstream health professionals’ stigmatising attitudes towards people with ID: a systematic review

Source: Pelleboer-Gunnink – 2017 – Journal of Intellectual Disability Research – Wiley Online Library

Abstract

Background

Equal access to mainstream healthcare services for people with intellectual disabilities (ID) still requires attention. Although recent studies suggest that health professionals hold positive attitudes towards people with ID, stigmatising attitudes may influence their efforts to serve people with ID in community healthcare practice. To stimulate inclusion in mainstream healthcare services, this systematic review focussed on barriers in attitudes of mainstream health professionals towards people with ID.

Method

Five electronic databases were systematically searched and references in full text articles were checked for studies published in the English language between January 1994 and January 2016. A social–psychological triad of cognitive, affective and behavioural dimensions of stigmatising attitudes is used to structure and discuss the results.

Results

The literature search generated 2190 records with 30 studies that passed our exclusion criteria. Studies were mostly cross-sectional and of moderate quality. With respect to stigma, a lack of familiarity with and knowledge about people with ID was found. ID was considered as a stable condition not under personal control. Moreover, mainstream health professionals had either low or high expectations of the capabilities of people with ID. Professionals reported stress, lack of confidence, fear and anxiety, a tendency to treat people with ID differently and a lack of supporting autonomy.

Conclusions

Stigmatising attitudes towards people with ID appeared to be present among mainstream health professionals. This might affect the ongoing challenges regarding inclusion in mainstream healthcare services. To facilitate inclusion in mainstream healthcare services, it is recommended to include contact and collaboration with experts-by-experience in education programs of health professionals. Future research should progress beyond descriptive accounts of stigma towards exploring relationships between cognitive, affective and behavioural dimensions as pointers for intervention. Finally, inclusion would benefit from an understanding of ‘equal’ treatment that means reasonable adjustments instead of undifferentiated treatment.