XCEL Training

XCEL is designed to give quick tips in an entertaining way to reception/support staff who interact with people with developmental disabilities in healthcare settings. It comprises of a 7 minute animated video, a fact sheet, and highlights other resources that are helpful.

 

Source: Florida Center for Inclusive Communities (FCIC)

XCEL Training

Accessible Hospitals and Medical Care Facilities – A Refresher Webinar

Source: Accessible Hospitals and Medical Care Facilities – A Refresher

This session will provide a refresher on the requirements in the ADA and ABA Accessibility standard for Hospitals and Long-Term Care facilities. The presenters will provide an in-depth review of the standards and design challenges in long-term care settings, including highlights from recent research. Additionally, strategies for success in the field that both comply with the standard and meet the needs of older adults and their caregivers will be discussed. This is a joint session presented by the Access Board and the AIA Codes and Standards Committee. Session participants are encouraged to submit questions in advance.

Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center: Improving Systems, Practices and Outcomes for Young Children with Disabilities and their Families

Source: ECTACenter.org : The Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center : Improving Systems, Practices and Outcomes for Young Children with Disabilities and their Families

Most recent additions to this page:

 National Child Traumatic Stress Network (2017) – established to improve access to care, treatment, and services for traumatized children and adolescents exposed to traumatic events. This resource includes descriptions of each type of trauma and evidence-based treatments that work.

 Caring for Children in a Disaster (2017) – This collection of resources from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offers simple steps to protect children in emergency situations and help meet their needs during and after a disaster.

Related pages:

State Community Health Worker Models – NASHP

As states transform their health systems many are turning to Community Health Workers (CHWs) to tackle some of the most challenging aspects of health improvement, such as facilitating care coordination, enhancing access to community-based services, and addressing social determinants of health.

Source: State Community Health Worker Models – NASHP

While state definitions vary, CHWs are typically frontline workers who are trusted members of and/or have a unique and intimate understanding of the communities they serve. This map highlights state activity to integrate CHWs into evolving health care systems in key areas such as financing, education and training, certification, and state definitions, roles and scope of practice. The map includes enacted state CHW legislation and provides links to state CHW associations and other leading organizations working on CHW issues in states.

Big Data and the Americans with Disabilities Act

Date Written: 2017

Abstract

While big data offers society many potential benefits, it also comes with serious risks. This Essay focuses on the concern that big data will lead to increased employment discrimination. It develops the novel argument that the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) should be amended in response to the big data phenomenon in order to protect individuals who are perceived as likely to develop physical or mental impairments in the future. Employers can obtain medical data about employees not only through the traditional means of medical examinations and inquiries, but also through the non-traditional mechanisms of social media, wellness programs, and data brokers. Information about workers’ habits, behaviors, or attributes that is derived from big data can be used to create profiles of undesirable employees. It can also be used to exclude healthy and qualified individuals whom employers regard as vulnerable to future medical problems. The ADA, which now protects only individuals with current or past disabilities and those who are perceived as having existing impairments, can no longer ignore the discrimination threats posed by predictive health data. The Essay analyzes these risks and propose a detailed statutory response to them.

Download Paper

Hoffman, Sharona, Big Data and the Americans with Disabilities Act (2017). 68 Hastings Law Journal 777 (2017); Case Legal Studies Research Paper No. 2016-33. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2841431

Where All Bodies Are Exquisite

Source: The New York Times

“Circle Story #10,” a 2003 painting of poet and essayist Eli Clare. Credit Riva Lehrer

It’s 2009, and I’m in Philadelphia to deliver a talk at a conference. During a long break, I decide to visit the Mutter Museum. I teach anatomy, and the Mutter houses a collection of so-called medical curiosities. I examine the wall of skulls, the cases full of skeletons, and go downstairs, where preserved specimens wait for inspection.

And there I am confronted with a large case full of specimen jars. Each jar contains a late-term fetus, and all of the fetuses have the same disability: Their spinal column failed to fuse all the way around their spinal cord, leaving holes (called lesions) in their spine. Some extrude a bulging sac containing a section of the cord. These balloons make the fetuses appear as if they’re about to explode. This condition is called spina bifida.

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18th Annual Chronic Illness and Disability Conference: Transition from Pediatric to Adult-based Care

AUCD is proud to support the online broadcast of Baylor College of Medicine’s 18th Annual Chronic Illness and Disability Conference.

Source: AUCD

Participate Remotely

All MCH Training Programs and UCEDDs are invited and encouraged to participate remotely by hosting a live stream of this conference for trainees, faculty, staff, families, and others at your center or program. Eligible broadcast sites include MCH training programs, UCEDDs, and Title V programs. This is an excellent opportunity for your trainees and staff to gain in-depth coverage of a range of transition issues at a very low cost of $150 per site.

An Engaging Agenda

Hosted by Baylor College of Medicine and available nationwide through an AUCD-sponsored live broadcast, this year’s conference is shaping up to be a valuable resource for the AUCD network and beyond. Register as a broadcast site in order to:

  • Listen to Toronto Children’s Hospital share about the role that social media and digital communications can play in engaging transition-aged youth
  • Participate in a breakout session on Supported Decision Making
  • Learn about one LEND alumni’s work toward educate others on healthy sexuality for people with I/DD
  • Earn CME and CNE Credits, Social Work CEUs, and PT and OT CCUs without leaving the office

… and much more!

Register

To register as a broadcast site, contact Baylor College of Medicine, Office of Continuing Medical Education, at 713-798-8237 or e-mail cme@bcm.edu for instructions. For registration questions, contact Baylor’s Cicely Simon. To speak with someone at AUCD about this event, contact Sarah DeMaio

Why We Participate

“Minnesota LEND partners with Gillette Lifetime Specialty Clinic in co-hosting the live broadcast of this conference …to learn about evidence-based practices in the critical need area of healthcare transition. Gillette staff members were very excited about this opportunity to ‘attend’ Baylor’s conference at their work place. We hope to increase this type of collaborative learning each year for our clinical partners and trainees.” 

– Rebecca Dosch-Brown, MN LEND Training Coordinator

Baylor does an excellent job of addressing the task of facilitating adolescent transition as youth learn to navigate health care, post-secondary work or school, and independent living. The mixture of national and local presenters who come from clinical, research, policy, advocacy, and patient perspectives provide a well-rounded presentation of the realities of transition. The annual conference jumps starts our trainees’ knowledge and skill development regarding transition. It allows us to introduce a wide array of issues that would take us much longer to do with our own content development. We are grateful that we are able to gain so much with a relatively small investment on our part.

– David Deere, Arkansas Regional LEND Training Director

“WI LEND program works with our state Youth Health Transition Hub to host at least 2 sites in Wisconsin – Madison and Milwaukee. LEND trainees participate as they are able, but are a small part of the audience. We have mostly providers (nurses, SW, MD, other health professionals), our MCH PPC partners and trainees, and just a few families, who come to the broadcast.”

-Anne Harris, WI LEND Director

Safety of People with Intellectual Disabilities in Hospital. What Can the Hospital Pharmacist Do to Improve Quality of Care?

How can pharmacists can contribute to safety by improving health outcomes and reducing health inequalities for people with intellectual disabilities?

Source: Pharmacy | Free Full-Text

Author: Bernadette Flood

Abstract 

People with intellectual disabilities are vulnerable in healthcare environments. They experience health and healthcare inequalities, and when admitted to general hospitals are at a greater risk of patient safety incidents. This is well known in specialist services, but less recognized within primary or secondary healthcare. The most significant barriers to safer and better healthcare appear to include ‘invisibility’ of people with intellectual disabilities within health-care systems, widespread lack of staff understanding of intellectual disability, the vulnerabilities of people with intellectual disabilities, and the reasonable adjustment they may need in order to access health-care services. They may be ‘invisible’ to pharmacists in general hospitals. This article aims to raise awareness among those pharmacists and others providing care and support to people with intellectual disabilities in hospital in relation to how pharmacists can contribute to safety. Medication is the main therapeutic intervention in this population. Research is needed to determine the role of pharmacists in improving health outcomes and reducing health inequalities in this vulnerable population group when they are admitted to general hospitals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Services Research in the Use of Medicines)

Attitudes towards people with physical or intellectual disabilities among nursing, social work and medical students (2017)

Source: Wiley Online Library Journal of Clinical Nursing

Authors: Kritsotakis, Galanis, Papastefanakis, Meidani, Philalithis, Kalokairinou, & Sourtzi

Abstract

Aims and objectives

To examine and compare undergraduate healthcare students’ attitudes toward people with physical or intellectual disabilities in Greece.

Background

The experience that people with disabilities have with health care is a complex interaction between their medical condition and the social and physical environment. Attitudes of the nursing and healthcare staff affect the quality of care and people’s adaptation to their disability, self-image and rehabilitation outcomes.

Design

Descriptive cross-sectional survey.

Methods

Nursing, Social Work, and Medicine students (N=1007, 79.4% female) attending three Universities (Athens, Crete) completed during 2014-2016 two standardized scales regarding physical (ATDP – B) and intellectual disability (CLAS – ID). Descriptive and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed.

Results

Attitudes toward physically disabled people in Greece (ATDP – B scores) were poor with scores just above the mid-point. Medical studies and higher knowledge and contact with individuals with physical disabilities signified marginally more positive attitudes. Gender and age displayed no associations with attitudes. Regarding intellectual disability (CLAS–ID scores), nursing students had slightly less positive attitudes in ‘Similarity’ but more positive attitudes in ‘Sheltering’ subscales. Previous work and contact was related to more favourable and higher age to less favourable ‘Similarity’ and ‘Sheltering’ attitudes. Males had higher ‘Exclusion’ scores. Those who knew people with intellectual disabilities had less favorable ‘Empowerment’ attitudes. Knowledge was related to more positive attitudes in all four CLAS – ID subscales.

Conclusions

Greek health and social care students showed poor attitudes towards people with physical and intellectual disability.

This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Include “Low-Tech” Options to Share Health Information with People with Disabilities

Source: New Hampshire Disability & Public Health Project (DPH) Data Briefs & Reports

Health and medical information is commonly shared via web sites, social media, smart phone apps, and even text messaging. However, these high tech options are not accessible to all people. Adults with disabilities in New Hampshire (NH) are significantly less likely than adults without disabilities to have access to information electronically.

Download Health Communication Needs: Low Tech Options

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