JAN Accommodation and Compliance Series: Nurses with Disabilities


Occupation and Industry Series:
Accommodating Nurses with Disabilities

JAN’s Occupation and Industry Series is designed to help employers determine effective accommodations for their employees with disabilities and comply with title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Each publication in the series addresses a specific occupation or industry and provides information about that occupation or industry, ADA issues, accommodation ideas, and resources for additional information.

A Chance to See Disabilities as Assets

A Chance to See Disabilities as Assets
By PEGGY KLAUS
New York Times
Published: February 4, 2012

MANY people know of Berkeley, Calif., as the birthplace, in the 1960’s, of the Free Speech Movement. Fewer people know that Berkeley also played a major role in the disability rights movement. It was here, also in the ’60s, that Ed Roberts — a student with quadriplegia — became an outspoken advocate of the cause.

Nurses With Disabilities: Another Minority Group

by Ruth Carol
MinorityNurse
People with disabilities are one of the most underrepresented voices in nursing. But like nurses of color, they have a lot to say about overcoming discrimination and barriers to take their rightful place in the profession.

Some people who dream of nursing careers are told they will never make it through nursing school. Some nurses who hear about a potential dream job are told they won’t even be considered a candidate for the position. Some are even told they have no business pursuing or continuing a career in health care altogether.

Although many of these nurses are not members of racial or ethnic minority groups, they are still a minority within the nursing profession. They are nurses with disabilities.

Geriatric Nurse, Senior Day Health Program


Geriatric Nurse, Senior Day Health Program

Luckily, as a result of being refused entrance to a hospital school of nursing at seventeen, I later graduated from the University of California in San Francisco (UCSF) with a BSN, RN, and Public Health Nursing certificate. This story is a description of my 10 years as Director of Medical Services (think Head Nurse) at a community-based, free-standing, day program for the “less-than-independent” elderly. These years (1986-96) happened to coincide with my vision loss due to low tension glaucoma, its treatment, and Sjogren’s syndrome.

The Story:

Nurses with Disabilities Find On-the-Job Support

by Linda Childers
Monster.com
While working as a nurse in today’s healthcare world can be stressful enough, nurses with disabilities can face additional on-the-job challenges, including colleagues who may not feel they are capable of doing the work and needing assistance in a job that often requires strength and stamina. However, by making some adjustments, nurses with disabilities can continue to practice their profession.

Labor & Delivery Nurse

Labor & Delivery Nurse
by Leora Heifetz

My name is Leora Heifetz and I have had a visual disability since birth. I work as a registered nurse (RN) on a labor and delivery unit in a level three hospital in the Chicago Metropolitan area and on a daily basis I am engaged in directly caring for patients. My job requires me to monitor women during labor and the delivery of their newborn baby. Upon delivery, I am involved with caring for both mother and child, until they are considered to be stable and are transferred to another unit in the hospital for the remainder of their stay.

New EEOC Publication Addresses Employment of Health Care Workers with Disabilities

New EEOC Publication Addresses Employment of Health Care Workers with Disabilities

Latest Q&A Fact Sheet Explains How Americans with Disabilities Act Applies to Employment in the Health Care Industry

WASHINGTON – Naomi C. Earp, Chair of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), today announced the issuance of a new question-and-answer (Q&A) fact sheet on the application of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) to job applicants and employees in the health care industry. The new publication, part of a series of Q&A documents about specific disabilities in the workplace and specific industries, is available on the EEOC’s web site at http://www.eeoc.gov/facts/health_care_workers.html.

Americans with Disabilities: Ready for the Global Workforce

Americans with Disabilities: Ready for the Global Workforce

U.S. Secretary of Labor Elaine L. Chao announced that “Americans with Disabilities: Ready for the Global Workforce” will be the official theme for October’s National Disability Employment Awareness Month, which is celebrated nationwide.

“The 2006 theme — “Americans with Disabilities: Ready for the Global Workforce” — highlights the fact that workers with disabilities are an underutilized and ambitious group of Americans eager to pursue their career dreams,” said Secretary of Labor Elaine L. Chao. “This theme echoes the President”s New Freedom Initiative which has been out in front in recognizing the need to promote greater job opportunities for workers with disabilities.”