The Sea Glass Group

The Sea Glass Group
Expanding the Boundaries of Professional Search

Specializing in the Recruitment of College and Advanced Degreed Professionals with Evident and Non-Evident Disabilities

What is The Sea Glass Group?
The Sea Glass Group is a privately held professional search firm headquartered in Chicago, IL and serving corporate clients across the country. We specialize in the sourcing and recruitment of college and advanced degreed professionals with evident and non-evident disabilities for corporate clients. Our placements range from executive, management, and experienced professional, to career building leadership positions for recent college graduates.

Open Job Opportunities
See a summary of open job positions.

US Labor Department’s Office of Disability Employment Policy announces 2012 theme for National Disability Employment Awareness Month

US Labor Department’s Office of Disability Employment Policy announces 2012 theme for National Disability Employment Awareness Month

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy today announced the official theme for October’s National Disability Employment Awareness Month: “A Strong Workforce is an Inclusive Workforce: What Can YOU Do?” The theme promotes the benefits of a diverse workforce that includes workers with disabilities, who represent a highly skilled talent pool.

Can I Be a Nurse if I Have Intermittent Conditions?

Can I Be a Nurse if I Have Intermittent Conditions?

Absolutely, you can be a nurse if you have a chronic, intermittent health condition.

If you have an episodic (intermittent) condition such as epilepsy, migraines, or fibromyalgia, you would be considered to have a disability if any of your major life activities are impaired when the condition is in its active state. When seeking ADA protection, remember that there must be a link between the disability or limitations and the task for which you need help.

Please explore our website for resources in regard to education, advocacy, and work. For assistance with the ADA, contact the Americans with Disabilities Act Technical Assistance Centers. Learning about the ADA Amendments Act of 2008 will help you to understand how the ADAAA broadens coverage for many individuals.

To request accommodations under the ADA, you will need to disclose your condition and provide documentation from your health care provider. Also, contact your local
contact your local Center for Independent Living for ideas about accommodations from people who have had similar issues.

If your chronic condition affects a major life activity such as seeing, hearing, walking, sleeping, etc., or a major bodily function such as those of the immune system, normal cell growth, or endocrine system, etc., you are covered under the ADA. Latex allergies also come under this portion of the ADA and its amendments.

 


Disclaimer: The National Organization of Nurses with Disabilities (NOND) does not offer legal advice but NOND does offer resources to help you understand your rights, protections, and responsibilities within various Disability Rights Laws.

A Strong Workforce is an Inclusive Workforce: What Can YOU Do?

A Strong Workforce is an Inclusive Workforce: What Can YOU Do?

Donna Martinez May 19, 2012

And apparently the US District Court in Oregon is in agreement!

From NDRN: Breaking News

Yesterday, the U.S. District Court in Oregon issued a 16-page Opinion and Order
in the case Lane v. Kiltzhaber, 3:12-cv-00138-ST. The Lane complaint claims that
failure to provide supported employment services violates Title II of the ADA
and the integration mandate. The Court granted the state defendants’ motion to
dismiss the complaint, but without prejudice and with leave to amend, while
directing the Plaintiffs how to correct the wording of the complaint. Most
importantly, the Court determined that the plaintiffs have valid cognizable
claims under Title II of the ADA and that the integration mandate applies to the
provision of employment-related services.

This case was filed by Disability Rights Oregon and co-counsels Center for
Public Representation, Perkins Coie LLP and Miller Nash LLP, on behalf of eight
individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities who are able and
would prefer to work in an integrated employment setting, but instead are
segregated in sheltered workshops.

Recognizing that this is a case of first impression, the Court noted “no other
case has applied the integration mandate in a context other than one in which
the state’s action places plaintiffs at risk of institutionalization. However,
the dearth of authority does not led inexorably to the conclusion that the
integration mandate is inapplicable to plaintiffs’ claims. To the contrary, the
broad language and remedial purposes of the ADA, the corresponding lack of any
limiting language in either the ADA or the integration mandate itself, and the
lack of any case law restricting the reach of the integration mandate suggests
just the opposition conclusion.” (Opinion at 10-11).

In reaching this conclusion, the Court carefully scrutinized the defendants’ arguments for dismissal, and gave deference to the U.S. Department of Justice’s interpretation
of the integration mandate which prohibits the unnecessary provision of services
in non-integrated settings, including segregated sheltered workshops. (Opinion
at 7-9).

The Court distinguished claims for a “discriminatory denial of services” versus
claims for “providing inadequate services,” holding that “a claim survives only
if it truly alleges a ‘discriminatory denial of services’ and must be dismissed
if it instead concerns the ‘adequacy’ of the services provided.” (Opinion at
13-16).

Noting that the plaintiffs clarified at oral argument that they are
seeking the “provision of employment services that would allow them the
opportunity to work in an integrated setting,” and seek to have defendants
“reallocate their available resources in a way that does not unjustifiably favor
segregated employment,” the court determined that some of the allegations in the
complaint “go beyond the clarification offered” at the hearing” and identified
specific claims subject to amendment. (Opinion at 14-15).

Plaintiffs have been
given leave to amend their complaint by May 29, “to clarify that the defendants
are violating Title II of the ADA and the Rehabilitation Act by denying
employment services to plaintiffs for which they are eligible with the result of
unnecessarily segregating them in sheltered workshops.” (Opinion at 16).

A Strong Workforce is an Inclusive Workforce: What Can YOU Do?

A Strong Workforce is an Inclusive Workforce: What Can YOU Do?

Donna Martinez May 19, 2012

And apparently the US District Court in Oregon is in agreement!

From NDRN: Breaking News

Yesterday, the U.S. District Court in Oregon issued a 16-page Opinion and Order
in the case Lane v. Kiltzhaber, 3:12-cv-00138-ST. The Lane complaint claims that
failure to provide supported employment services violates Title II of the ADA
and the integration mandate. The Court granted the state defendants’ motion to
dismiss the complaint, but without prejudice and with leave to amend, while
directing the Plaintiffs how to correct the wording of the complaint. Most
importantly, the Court determined that the plaintiffs have valid cognizable
claims under Title II of the ADA and that the integration mandate applies to the
provision of employment-related services.

WISER's New Report Highlights Effective Financial Education Project For Nurses

In honor of National Nurses Week, WISER is pleased to release the final report from our Nurses’ Investor Education Project, a multi-year financial education initiative aiming to improve nurses’ financial security using educational tools, resources and peer-to-peer training and workshops. Read the report and press release.

A new report from the Women’s Institute for a Secure Retirement (WISER) and the American Nurses Association (ANA) highlights the effectiveness of a turn-key, peer-to-peer financial education program that is helping nurses across the country take action towards a secure financial future.

Do Workers with Disabilities Cost More?

Do Workers with Disabilities Cost More?

Employers in the U.S. hospitality industry are often reluctant to hire people with disabilities because of preconceived notions that they cannot do the jobs and are more costly to employ than people without disabilities, according to University of New Hampshire researchers.

ODEP and National Organization of Nurses with Disabilities (NOND) Alliance

ODEP and National Organization of Nurses with Disabilities (NOND) Alliance

ODEP and NOND recognize the value of establishing a collaborative relationship to promote the employment of people with disabilities in the healthcare industry. ODEP and NOND hereby form an Alliance to conduct outreach, education and technical assistance activities that promote the recruitment, hiring, retention and advancement of individuals with disabilities, including veterans with disabilities, in the healthcare sector.

Beth Marks, NOND President, and ODEP Assistant Secretary Kathy Martinez, sign the Alliance agreement.

Beth_Marks-and-Kathy_Martinez