Conference | DDNA

Source: Conference | DDNA

“Celebrating our Past, Shaping our Future”

2017 Conference Overview

The 2017 conference theme is “Celebrating our Past, Shaping our Future!”  As the premiere resource for practicing I/DD nurses, DDNA is committed to providing quality education programs that include cutting edge content with practical application.

CONFERENCE PROGRAM STRUCTURE It’s all about the CEs!

DDNA’s 2017 annual conference will be structured a bit differently than in previous years – offering a longer conference program and more accredited continuing education courses and opportunities! The conference registration fee will include 3 ½ full days of conference program and continuing education, offering over 23 hours of continuing education.

As we celebrate our silver anniversary, we would also like to offer our members an additional reason to celebrate with us!   With the longer conference program and additional continuing education, this year’s conference rate is 5% below the 2016 conference fees for comparable hours of continuing education.  The conference will also offer a pre-conference program, providing 6 additional hours of continuing education, available to all conference attendees as an additional purchase!

The result – over 29 hours of continuing education are available with attendance at all conference and pre-conference programs!

Target audience: Health care professionals working in the field of intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Overall objectives: The goals and objectives of the conference are:

  • To present cutting-edge education on the most up-to-date practice issues and research regarding the specialty of developmental disabilities nursing.
  • To provide a forum for networking and to facilitate the sharing of information to improve nursing practice in the developmental disabilities field.
  • To bring together leaders and experts in developmental disabilities to engender consensus that improves the health and lives of persons with developmental disabilities.

Technical Standards for Nursing Education Programs in the 21st Century.

Ailey, S. H. & Marks, B. (2016). Technical Standards for Nursing Education Programs in the 21st Century. Rehabilitation Nursing. doi: 10.1002/rnj.278

Abstract

Purpose  The Institute of Medicine (IOM, 2000; 2002) exposed serious safety problems in the health system and called for total qualitative system change. The IOM (2011; 2015) also calls for improving the education of nurses to provide leadership for a redesigned health system. Intertwined with improving education is the need to recruit and retain diverse highly qualified students. Disability is part of diversity inclusion, but current technical standards (nonacademic requirements) for admission to many nursing programs are a barrier to the entry of persons with disabilities. Rehabilitation nurse leaders are in a unique position to improve disability diversity in nursing. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the importance of disability diversity in nursing.

Design  The history of existing technical standards used in many nursing programs is reviewed along with examples.

Methods  Based on the concept that disability inclusion is a part of diversity inclusion, we propose a new model of technical standards for nursing education.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance  Rehabilitation nurse leaders can lead in eliminating barriers to persons with disabilities entering nursing.

Disclosure of Disabilities by Medical Students

Source: Disclosure of Disabilities by Medical Students

In Reply Ms Schwartz emphasizes the importance of disclosure as it relates to providing opportunities to medical students with disabilities. Although disclosure is important, if not necessary, for receiving accommodations from an institution, disclosure alone is unlikely to change the broader attitudes and cultural norms that limit access to medical education for students with disabilities. First, the direction of causality is unclear. The fear of disclosure and the culture that precipitates that fear are likely jointly determined: lack of disclosure may contribute to a less-inclusive culture for students with disabilities, but that culture may also breed a fear of disclosure. Second, full disclosure would be difficult to enforce. The decision to disclose may be weighed differently by the applicant, who desires admission, compared with the matriculant, who has already been admitted and desires accommodations. Third, not all disabilities are readily apparent. Although Schwartz emphasizes physical disabilities, research suggests that nonphysical disabilities such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, learning disabilities, and psychological disabilities are more prevalent among US medical students.1 Those with nonapparent disabilities may face considerable bias that disclosure alone does little to resolve.

Physical Limits on CPR Quality and Methods for Quality Improvement

Physical Limits on CPR Quality and Methods for Quality Improvement

This is interesting research suggesting that many people are not able to perform effective CPR because of the amount of force required. This researcher is working on this with the hope that the American Heart Association will start teaching people to do compressions with their foot, which is more effective and less exhausting. His data might be useful to someone with a disability who has been told that they cannot be a nurse without being certified in CPR.

Here’s a little more info if you’re interested:
http://www.slicc.org/ReSS_2013_030.pdf

Attitudes of staff nurse preceptors related to the education of nurses with learning disabilities in clinical settings

by L’Ecuyer, Kristine Marie, Ph.D., SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY, 2014, 212 pages; 3624082
Abstract:
This dissertation presents a quantitative study of the attitudes of staff nurse preceptors toward nursing students with learning disabilities. There are an increased number of nursing students with learning disabilities. These students may have additional challenges in clinical settings, particularly if clinical settings do not understand or support their educational needs. Stigma exists towards people with learning disabilities, and it is unclear if staff nurse preceptors are accepting of nursing students with learning disabilities and willing to serve as a preceptor.
Attitude was measured with the following four constructs developed for this study: perceived levels of preceptor preparedness, level of confidence in implementation of preceptor role, preceptor beliefs of student potential, and agreement with the provision of reasonable accommodations. These constructs were developed through a review of the literature and found to best represent the dynamic relationship between the preceptor and the preceptee.

LearnHowToBecome.org

LearnHowToBecome.org, recently published a new guide to nursing careers and degree programs. The guide begins with a comprehensive view of the larger nursing landscape, and then dives deeper into the field’s many specializations, including registered nurses, licensed practical and vocational nurses, nurse practitioners, neonatal nurses and more. For each specialization, the guide examines the following elements:

  • Roles and responsibilities
  • Essential skills
  • Common and recommended educational paths
  • Career advancement
  • Salary by state and level
  • Related careers


The new guide was researched and written by Marijke Durning, a nurse educator, administrator, and former clinical nurse with years of medical education and experience. To read through the guide and learn more about Marijke, please visit the following page: 
 
Nursing degrees and careers:
 
Registered Nurse degrees and careers:

Think College

ThinkCollege.net

Think College is a national organization dedicated to developing, expanding, and improving inclusive higher education options for people with intellectual disability. With a commitment to equity and excellence, Think College supports evidence-based and student centered research and practice by generating and sharing knowledge, guiding institutional change, informing public policy, and engaging with students, professionals and families. Click to learn more about our various grant projects.

Deaf Medical Student Wins ADA Case Against Creighton

Deaf Medical Student Wins ADA Case Against Creighton

On September 4, 2013, Michael Argenyi, a deaf medical student, represented by the National Association of the Deaf (NAD), the law firm of Stein & Vargas and Disability Rights Nebraska, won a jury trial against Creighton University in the United States District Court for the District of Nebraska. Mr. Argenyi had been a student in the medical school at Creighton University beginning in 2009, and had requested that Creighton University provide him with real time captioning for classes and oral interpreters for clinics. Creighton refused to provide him with such services and also refused to allow Mr. Argenyi to bring interpreters even if he paid for the interpreters himself.

Additional Federal Attention Needed to Help Protect Access for Students with Disabilities

Charter schools enrolled a lower percentage of students with disabilities than traditional public schools, but little is known about the factors contributing to these differences. In school year 2009-2010, which was the most recent data available at the time of our review, approximately 11 percent of students enrolled in traditional public schools were students with disabilities compared to about 8 percent of students enrolled in charter schools.
Read GAO Report: Additional Federal Attention Needed to Help Protect Access for Students with Disabilities