Crip for a Day – New research shows role-playing disability promotes distress, discomfort and disinterest 

Source: New research shows role-playing disability promotes distress, discomfort and disinterest

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28287757

Professionals in the fields of education and rehabilitation psychology have long used disability simulations to try to promote understanding and improve attitudes about persons with disabilities. To simulate blindness, for instance, participants might complete tasks while wearing blindfolds or goggles. Others use earplugs to mimic deafness. Others may navigate indoor and outdoor areas in a wheelchair. The idea is to boost empathy by giving people perspective on what it is like to have a disability.

However, a recent study published by Michelle Nario-Redmond, Ph.D., professor of psychology, reveals that disability simulations often result in feelings of fear, apprehension and pity toward those with disabilities, proving Nario-Redmond’s thesis that disability simulations do more harm than good.

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YouthBuild: Goal Planning Tool

Goal Planning Tool Author(s): YouthBuild USA This goal planning tool was designed to engage staff across each program components and the young person in the goal planning and assessment process. This process should be introduced very early in the program year, ideally towards the end of mental toughness or shortly after the completion of mental toughness. It tracks the young person’s academic, career, and personal goals and aspirations while allowing both staff and young people to track assessment scores

Source: YouthBuild: Goal Planning Tool

Preparing for Life After High School: Characteristics and Experiences of Youth in Special Education

Findings from the National Longitudinal Transition Study 2012. Volume 1: Comparisons with Other Youth (Full Report)

Key Findings: Youth with an IEP are more likely than their peers to be socioeconomically disadvantaged and to face problems with health, communication, and completing typical tasks independently. The vast majority of youth with and without an IEP feel positive about school, but those with an IEP experience bullying and are suspended at higher rates, and are less engaged in school and social activities. Youth with an IEP are more likely than youth without an IEP to struggle academically, yet less likely to

Source: Preparing for Life After High School: The Characteristics and Experiences of Youth in Special Education. Findings from the National Longitudinal Transition Study 2012. Volume 1: Comparisons with Other Youth (Full Report)

Policymakers and educators have long recognized the importance of addressing the needs of youth in special education, who today account for 12 percent of all youth in the United States. Concern that this objective was not being adequately met led Congress to pass landmark legislation in 1975, now known as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) (U.S. Department of Education, 2010). IDEA mandates that children and youth with disabilities have access to a free appropriate public education.

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A Young Person’s Guide to Health Care Transition | NCWD/Youth

Source: A Young Person’s Guide to Health Care Transition | NCWD/Youth

A Young-Persons-Guide-to-Health-Care-Transition is about making the transition from pediatric to adult health care. This brief will review topics youth should consider around transitioning to adult health care, living a healthy lifestyle, and paying for health care. Youth need to be a part of conversations about health care. Most youth rely on their parents to handle decisions about their health care and health coverage. Before you know it, you may be expected to make these decisions on your own, if you are not doing so already. This brief will provide some information and help you think about ways you can start planning now for your transition from pediatric to adult health care.

Taking charge of your health care transition goes hand in hand with helping you achieve your career and life goals. Managing your health and wellness as a young person is the first step necessary for going to school, transitioning to work, and living the life you want. To make your dreams and career goals a reality, start learning about your health, health insurance, and health care transition planning at a young age. Make it a habit to manage your health and well-being as a young person, and you will carry this skill throughout your life.

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National Center on Improving Literacy

Evidence-based resources for improving outcomes for students with literacy-related disabilities, including dyslexia.

About Us

The National Center on Improving Literacy is a partnership among literacy experts, university researchers, and technical assistance providers, with funding from the United States Department of Education.

Our Mission

To increase access to, and use of, evidence-based approaches to screen, identify, and teach students with literacy-related disabilities, including dyslexia. Download our handout.

Health Services in Schools: Medicaid and Special Education Services

Executive Summary

This NHeLP fact sheet provides information about health services for children, under age of 21, in schools. Many of the services are provided in schools, and some these services are provided Medicaid and/or the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, or IDEA.

DOWNLOAD PUBLICATION (IDEA – Health Services in Schools – 1 Pager)

Source: Health Services in Schools: Medicaid and Special Education Services

Health services in schools.

  • Services provided in schools can play an important role in child and adolescent health care.
  • Many services are already provided in schools: through school-based health clinics, school nurses, or through special education programs. This includes services such as mental health services and physical, occupational, and speech therapies.
  • Some of these services can be covered by Medicaid.
  • Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic and Treatment (EPSDT)

Medicaid services for children.

  • Medicaid requires that children under age 21 get Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic, and Treatment services, or EPSDT.
  • EPSDT covers screenings (checkups) and treatment for medical, mental health, dental, vision, and hearing problems.
  • Treatment includes services that can provided in schools, like:

    Physical, occupational, and speech therapy.
    Vaccinations.
    Hearing and vision screenings.
    Behavioral health services.

Success for Students and Nurses with Disabilities: A Call to Action for Nurse Educators

Marks, B. & McCulloh, K. (2016). Success for Students and Nurses with Disabilities: A Call to Action for Nurse Educators, Nurse Educator, 41(1), 9-12. doi: 10.1097/NNE.0000000000000212.

This article presents a ‘‘call to action’’ for nurse educators to identify and implement best practices supporting the success of students with disabilities given recent federal legislative changes. Best practices for educating students with disabilities in nursing education are discussed. Increasing our understanding of disability from a variety of models—not just the medical model—will promote greater diversity and inclusivity within the nursing profession, which will enhance patient care.

Success for Students and Nurses with Disabilities: A Call to Action for Nurse Educators

Conference | DDNA

Source: Conference | DDNA

“Celebrating our Past, Shaping our Future”

2017 Conference Overview

The 2017 conference theme is “Celebrating our Past, Shaping our Future!”  As the premiere resource for practicing I/DD nurses, DDNA is committed to providing quality education programs that include cutting edge content with practical application.

CONFERENCE PROGRAM STRUCTURE It’s all about the CEs!

DDNA’s 2017 annual conference will be structured a bit differently than in previous years – offering a longer conference program and more accredited continuing education courses and opportunities! The conference registration fee will include 3 ½ full days of conference program and continuing education, offering over 23 hours of continuing education.

As we celebrate our silver anniversary, we would also like to offer our members an additional reason to celebrate with us!   With the longer conference program and additional continuing education, this year’s conference rate is 5% below the 2016 conference fees for comparable hours of continuing education.  The conference will also offer a pre-conference program, providing 6 additional hours of continuing education, available to all conference attendees as an additional purchase!

The result – over 29 hours of continuing education are available with attendance at all conference and pre-conference programs!

Target audience: Health care professionals working in the field of intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Overall objectives: The goals and objectives of the conference are:

  • To present cutting-edge education on the most up-to-date practice issues and research regarding the specialty of developmental disabilities nursing.
  • To provide a forum for networking and to facilitate the sharing of information to improve nursing practice in the developmental disabilities field.
  • To bring together leaders and experts in developmental disabilities to engender consensus that improves the health and lives of persons with developmental disabilities.

Technical Standards for Nursing Education Programs in the 21st Century.

Ailey, S. H. & Marks, B. (2016). Technical Standards for Nursing Education Programs in the 21st Century. Rehabilitation Nursing. doi: 10.1002/rnj.278

Abstract

Purpose  The Institute of Medicine (IOM, 2000; 2002) exposed serious safety problems in the health system and called for total qualitative system change. The IOM (2011; 2015) also calls for improving the education of nurses to provide leadership for a redesigned health system. Intertwined with improving education is the need to recruit and retain diverse highly qualified students. Disability is part of diversity inclusion, but current technical standards (nonacademic requirements) for admission to many nursing programs are a barrier to the entry of persons with disabilities. Rehabilitation nurse leaders are in a unique position to improve disability diversity in nursing. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the importance of disability diversity in nursing.

Design  The history of existing technical standards used in many nursing programs is reviewed along with examples.

Methods  Based on the concept that disability inclusion is a part of diversity inclusion, we propose a new model of technical standards for nursing education.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance  Rehabilitation nurse leaders can lead in eliminating barriers to persons with disabilities entering nursing.

Disclosure of Disabilities by Medical Students

Source: Disclosure of Disabilities by Medical Students

In Reply Ms Schwartz emphasizes the importance of disclosure as it relates to providing opportunities to medical students with disabilities. Although disclosure is important, if not necessary, for receiving accommodations from an institution, disclosure alone is unlikely to change the broader attitudes and cultural norms that limit access to medical education for students with disabilities. First, the direction of causality is unclear. The fear of disclosure and the culture that precipitates that fear are likely jointly determined: lack of disclosure may contribute to a less-inclusive culture for students with disabilities, but that culture may also breed a fear of disclosure. Second, full disclosure would be difficult to enforce. The decision to disclose may be weighed differently by the applicant, who desires admission, compared with the matriculant, who has already been admitted and desires accommodations. Third, not all disabilities are readily apparent. Although Schwartz emphasizes physical disabilities, research suggests that nonphysical disabilities such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, learning disabilities, and psychological disabilities are more prevalent among US medical students.1 Those with nonapparent disabilities may face considerable bias that disclosure alone does little to resolve.