Attitudes towards people with physical or intellectual disabilities among nursing, social work and medical students (2017)

Source: Wiley Online Library Journal of Clinical Nursing

Authors: Kritsotakis, Galanis, Papastefanakis, Meidani, Philalithis, Kalokairinou, & Sourtzi

Abstract

Aims and objectives

To examine and compare undergraduate healthcare students’ attitudes toward people with physical or intellectual disabilities in Greece.

Background

The experience that people with disabilities have with health care is a complex interaction between their medical condition and the social and physical environment. Attitudes of the nursing and healthcare staff affect the quality of care and people’s adaptation to their disability, self-image and rehabilitation outcomes.

Design

Descriptive cross-sectional survey.

Methods

Nursing, Social Work, and Medicine students (N=1007, 79.4% female) attending three Universities (Athens, Crete) completed during 2014-2016 two standardized scales regarding physical (ATDP – B) and intellectual disability (CLAS – ID). Descriptive and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed.

Results

Attitudes toward physically disabled people in Greece (ATDP – B scores) were poor with scores just above the mid-point. Medical studies and higher knowledge and contact with individuals with physical disabilities signified marginally more positive attitudes. Gender and age displayed no associations with attitudes. Regarding intellectual disability (CLAS–ID scores), nursing students had slightly less positive attitudes in ‘Similarity’ but more positive attitudes in ‘Sheltering’ subscales. Previous work and contact was related to more favourable and higher age to less favourable ‘Similarity’ and ‘Sheltering’ attitudes. Males had higher ‘Exclusion’ scores. Those who knew people with intellectual disabilities had less favorable ‘Empowerment’ attitudes. Knowledge was related to more positive attitudes in all four CLAS – ID subscales.

Conclusions

Greek health and social care students showed poor attitudes towards people with physical and intellectual disability.

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How to Make Healthcare Accessible for All

Source: University of Washington, Healthy Aging RRTC

Healthcare access is important for all individuals, especially for people with disabilities. However, people with disabilities don’t always receive the healthcare they need. Several barriers can make it harder for them to access critical healthcare services or build optimal working relationships with their providers. Fortunately, by being aware of these barriers, we can overcome them with changes in design, training, and policy.

Download How to Make Healthcare Accessible for All

Centers Serving High Percentages of Young Hispanic Children Compare Favorably to Other Centers on Key Predictors of Quality

Source: Child Trends

Julia Mendez, Danielle Crosby, Lina Guzman, and Michael López (June 2017)

Download Predictors-of-Quality

Why research on low-income Hispanic children and families matters Hispanic or Latino children currently make up roughly 1 in 4 of all children in the United States, and by 2050 are projected to make up 1 in 3, similar to the number of white children. Given this increase, how Hispanic children fare will have a profound impact on the social and economic well-being of the country as a whole.

Notably, though, 5.7 million Hispanic children, or one third of all Hispanic children in the United States, are in poverty, more than in any other racial/ethnic group.

Nearly two thirds of Hispanic children live in low-income families, defined as having incomes of less than two times the federal poverty level.

Despite their high levels of economic need, Hispanics, particularly those in immigrant families, have lower rates of participation in many government support programs when compared with other racial/ ethnic minority groups.e-g High-quality, research-based information on the characteristics, experiences, and diversity of Hispanic children and families is needed to inform programs and policies supporting the sizable population of low-income Hispanic families and children.

Doctors With Disabilities: Why They’re Important – The New York Times

There’s good reason to believe a more diverse work force — one that includes doctors with disabilities — would be good for patients and doctors. Patients of various backgrounds tend to feel more comfortable with physicians like them, and that’s true for people with disabilities as well.

Source: Doctors With Disabilities: Why They’re Important – The New York Times

More than 20 percent of Americans — nearly 57 million people — live with a disability, including 8 percent of children and 10 percent of nonelderly adults. And while the medical profession is devoted to caring for the ill, often it doesn’t do enough to meet the needs of the disabled.

Read entire article… Doctors With Disabilities- Why They’re Important – NYTimes

 

Dr. Gregory Snyder, a physician at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, has paralysis in his legs after a spinal cord injury during medical school. He uses a wheelchair and says that he’s sometimes mistaken for a patient while working. But that’s not necessarily a bad thing.

“It reminds us that at some point we’ll all be patients,” he said. “And perhaps, when we least expect it.”

Over the course of our lives, most of us will acquire a disability: More than two thirds of Americans over the age of 80 have a motor, sensory or cognitive impairment.

Dr. Snyder remembers the difficulty of adjusting to life as a patient after his accident, and the long road to recovery. But he says his disability and rehabilitation have fundamentally changed the way he cares for patients — for the better.

“I would have been this six-foot-tall, blond-haired, blue-eyed Caucasian doctor standing at the foot of the bed in a white coat,” he said. “Now I’m a guy in a wheelchair sitting right next to my patients. They know I’ve been in that bed just like they have. And I think that means something.”

There’s good reason to believe a more diverse work force — one that includes doctors with disabilities — would be good for patients and doctors. Patients of various backgrounds tend to feel more comfortable with physicians like them, and that’s true for people with disabilities as well.

Embedding Cultural Diversity and Cultural and Linguistic Competence: A Guide for UCEDD Curricula and Training Activities

Source: UCEDDs at Georgetown, Georgia State, and Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, and in collaboration with AUCD

A new project and website from the UCEDDs at Georgetown, Georgia State, and Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, and in collaboration with AUCD.
This project is designed to research, develop, and disseminate a set or resources for the national network of University Centers for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (UCEDDs) to embed cultural diversity and cultural and linguistic competence (CLC) in their curricula and training activities. The project will build the capacity of network programs to embed widely accepted CLC policies, structures, and practices across the four UCEDD core functions of pre-service training and continuing education, community services, research, and information dissemination. The project has a special focus on unserved and underserved communities in the United States, its territories, and tribal communities.

The Unique Challenges of Surveying U.S. Latinos | Pew Research Center

As the U.S. Hispanic population grows, reaching nearly 57 million in 2015 and making up 18% of the nation’s population, it is becoming increasingly important to represent Hispanics in surveys of the U.S. population and to understand their opinions and behavior. But surveying Hispanics is complicated for many reasons – language barriers, sampling issues and cultural differences – that are the subject of a growing field of inquiry. This report explores some the unique challenges currently facing survey researchers in reaching Hispanics and offers considerations on how to meet those challenges based on the research literature and our experiences in fielding the Pew Research Center’s National Survey of Latinos.

Source: The Unique Challenges of Surveying U.S. Latinos | Pew Research Center

By Anna Brown

Designing the Survey Questionnaire: Stress Confidentiality, Translate with Cultural Context in Mind

A respondent’s answer to a survey question, or even their decision to participate in the survey at all, is a product of social and cognitive context and may differ across racial and ethnic groups. In fact, studies have shown that Hispanics are more likely to refuse to participate in surveys, or having agreed to take a survey, more likely to refuse to answer individual questions under some circumstances. This disproportionate refusal rate may in part be driven by a general suspicion of government or a more specific fear of deportation among subgroups of the U.S. Hispanic population, including unauthorized immigrants. Introductory language at the start of the questionnaire that stresses the random selection of the respondent and confidentiality of responses can help to mitigate this risk, though experience suggests it will not mitigate it entirely.

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Developing Culturally Responsive Approaches to Serving Diverse Populations: A Resource Guide for Community-Based Organizations

Michael López, Kerry Hofer, Erin Bumgarner, and Djaniele Taylor

Cultural-Competence-Guide

A changing population According to 2013 U.S. Census data: • 48 percent of children under the age of 18 were members of racial/ethnic groups other than nonHispanic white. • Of this group, Hispanics represented the largest racial/ethnic group (24 percent), followed by nonHispanic blacks (14 percent) and non-Hispanic Asians (5 percent). • Hispanics also are a fast-growing racial/ethnic group, almost tripling as a share of the U.S. population between 1980 (9 percent) and 2013 (24 percent). a Across that culturally and linguistically diverse population, however, there is great variability within any given racial/ethnic group. Understanding the variability within and across racial/ethnic subgroups is an important step any organization must take to ensure its services are culturally responsive to the needs of its targeted population.

http://www.hispanicresearchcenter.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Cultural-Competence-Guide.pdf