Healthy Communities: What you can do

Source: What you can do

A new survey shows 94 percent of Americans are willing to take positive action to make their community a healthier place, according to research conducted by the Aetna Foundation.

hands joined in circle and two people smiling

You can play a role in creating more healthy days where you live! Don’t wait! Start the Healthiest Cities & Counties conversation in your area today:

  • POTENTIAL PARTICIPANTS: Is your community making a collaborative effort to become a healthier city or county? Join the Challenge and tell us how your city or county is creating more healthy days where you live.
  • COMMUNITY MEMBERS: Real change starts at the grassroots level, and a healthier city or county starts with you! Share information with your friends, family, peers and elected officials. Send a link to the local elected official, academic institution, business or organization in your area that has shown interest in improving the health of your community.

Share this image and link to the Healthiest Cities & Counties Challenge website:

Create More Healthy Days and Join Healthiest Cities & Counties Challenge

Check out our Frequently Asked Questions to learn more.

Healthiest Cities & Counties: The Challenge

Source: Welcome to the Challenge

We believe a healthy city/county is economically competitive, inclusive and equitable. That’s why we’ve called on cities and counties across the country to join the Healthiest Cities & Counties Challenge. The Challenge is a partnership between the Aetna Foundation, the American Public Health Association and the National Association of Counties and administered by CEOs For Cities. The partnership empowers small to mid-size U.S. cities and counties to create a positive health impact.

WHAT’S NEW?

Durham and Carrabus counties in North Carolina highlight their successful event on health policy and innovation, and Gulfport, Mississippi showcases pictures of a community garden designed by elementary school students. Catch up on Wyandotte County, Kansas‘ new video that highlights their “Safe Routes to Parks” approach. And Mecklenburg County, North Carolina’s new video shows how their Village HeartBEAT program will expand thanks to the Challenge.

Check out our map page to learn more about how our HealthyCommunity50 are improving health in the areas of healthy behaviors, community safety, built environment, social/economic factors and environmental exposures.

We’re awarding more than $1.5 million in prizes to cities, counties and federally recognized tribes most able to show measurable changes in health and wellness over the next several years.

Questions about the Challenge? Email hccc@ceosforcities.org or call Healthiest Cities & Counties Challenge Director Debbie Nadzam at 216-523-7348.

Data-Driven, Cross-Sector, and Community-Led Transformation: Place-based Population Health

Toward Data-Driven, Cross-Sector, and Community-Led Transformation: Academy Health provides an overview of the findings including the who, the what and the how.
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The Community Health Peer Learning Program (CHP), a partnership of AcademyHealth and the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC), conducted an environmental scan of multisector initiatives driving toward population health improvement at the community level, many with a focus on capturing, sharing, integrating, and using data to support their work. The scan and ensuing report confirm the emergence and rapid expansion of such efforts, and reflect a growing recognition that local conditions often drive the environmental and social determinants of health. Many place-based population health improvement efforts, therefore, involve sectors outside of health care (e.g., housing, education, criminal justice), and this report profiles several different programs and strategies designed to build and sustain these cross-sector collaborations. The report also conveys the scale, scope, and diversity of ongoing efforts, and offers insights into common challenges, emerging strategies, and promising practices to accelerate progress.Ultimately, the scan and associated report reveal the emergence of a movement—a convergence of programs and people connecting across traditional and non-traditional boundaries, and working together to improve community health.

Download the Executive Summary above, or click here for the full report.

Source: Toward Data-Driven, Cross-Sector, and Community-Led Transformation: Executive Summary | Academy Health

Knowledge Translation Case Book

Knowledge Translation Case Book

Source: KT Casebook

The Center on Knowledge Translation for Disability and Rehabilitation Research (KTDRR) has developed the Knowledge Translation (KT) Casebook to highlight what NIDILRR grantees are doing in the area of knowledge translation. Many grantees have indicated that they feel the development of a casebook of KT activities and accomplishments will help to:

  • Learn from each other’s experiences
  • Make connections with other grantees that may facilitate and expand our KT actions
  • Gain new ideas about KT strategies being used by other grantees
  • Identify KT examples that have focused on stakeholder or target audiences of interest
  • Expand awareness of the KT accomplishments being made by NIDILRR grantees

We will update these entries as appropriate and add more NIDILRR grantees’ KT stories to the KT Casebook annually. If your NIDILRR grant project would like to share your experience to be included in the next KT Casebook, please contact us today!

Guidelines for Dementia-Related Health Advocacy for Adults With Intellectual Disability and Dementia: National Task Group on Intellectual Disabilities and Dementia Practices. Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Kathleen M. Bishop, Mary Hogan, Matthew P. Janicki, Seth M. Keller, Ronald Lucchino, Dawna T. Mughal, Elizabeth A. Perkins, Baldev K. Singh, Kathy Service, Sarah Wolfson, and the Health Planning Work Group of the National Task Group on Intellectual Disabilities and Dementia Practices (2015)

Guidelines for Dementia-Related Health Advocacy for Adults With Intellectual Disability and Dementia: National Task Group on Intellectual Disabilities and Dementia Practices. Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, February 2015, Vol. 53, No. 1, pp. 2-29. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/1934-9556-53.1.2