Include “Low-Tech” Options to Share Health Information with People with Disabilities

Source: New Hampshire Disability & Public Health Project (DPH) Data Briefs & Reports

Health and medical information is commonly shared via web sites, social media, smart phone apps, and even text messaging. However, these high tech options are not accessible to all people. Adults with disabilities in New Hampshire (NH) are significantly less likely than adults without disabilities to have access to information electronically.

Download Health Communication Needs: Low Tech Options

SUNspot – Wireless Device Ownership by People with Disabilities

Wireless Inclusive Technologies RERC

This SUNspot addresses the following question related to ownership of wireless devices by adults with disabilities:  Do people with disabilities own wireless devices (regular phones, smartphones and tablets) at the same rates as the general population?

Comparison of the results from the SUN and the Pew Research Center show that people with disabilities own cellphones at a high rate (83%), but still substantially lower than the general population (92%). Drilling down to examine the rates of ownership of specific types of mobile wireless devices shows that people with disabilities own smart devices (smartphones and tablets) at slightly higher rates than the general population. People with disabilities own basic cellphones at much lower rates than the general population.

Assistive Technology and Environmental Intervention (AT-EI ) Impact On Activity and Life Roles of Aging Persons with Developmental Disabilities: Findings and Implications for Practice

Assistive Technology and Environmental Intervention (AT-EI ) Impact On Activity and Life Roles of Aging Persons with Developmental Disabilities: Findings and Implications for Practice (2001). Hammel, J. Journal of Occupational and Physical Therapy in Geriatrics, 18(1), 37-58.