Include “Low-Tech” Options to Share Health Information with People with Disabilities

Source: University of New Hampshire, Disability and Public Health Project (NH UCEDD)

Adults with disabilities in New Hampshire (NH) are significantly less likely than adults without disabilities to have access to information electronically. This can affect access to:

  • Online communities that encourage healthy behaviors;
  • Electronic health records & appointment reminders;
  • Knowledge & strategies to maintain & improve health.

Download Health Communication Needs

JAN Blog » Accommodations, Accessibility, and the ADA

Accommodations, Accessibility, and the ADA

Source: JAN Blog » Accommodations, Accessibility, and the ADA

By: Matthew McCord, Consultant – Motor Team

Back in 2014, Elisabeth Simpson wrote a Blog post on low cost accommodation solutions. Three years have passed since then, and I think it is time to revisit this subject and provide you all with some additional options to keep in your toolkit. However, this post will focus more on Do-It-Yourself style accommodations. So, if you are one to enjoy rolling up your sleeves and tackling accommodation needs directly rather than purchasing a product, then this Blog article is for you. Even if you aren’t a hands-on kind of person, some of these options may still be helpful.

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Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Successful Completion of Anesthesia Residency: A Case Report Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Successful Completion of Anesthesia Residency: A Case Report Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Successful Completion of Anesthesia Residency: A Case Report

Michael G. Fitzsimons, MD, Jason C. Brookman, MD, Sarah H. Arnholz, JD, and Keith Baker, MD, PhD

Abstract
Cognitive and physical disabilities among anesthesia residents are not well studied. Cognitive disabilities may often go undiagnosed among trainees, and these trainees may struggle during their graduate medical education. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is an executive function disorder that may manifest as lack of vigilance, an inability to adapt to the rapid changes associated with anesthesia cases, distractibility, an inability to prioritize activities, and even periods of hyperfocusing, among other signs. Programs are encouraged to work closely with residents with such disabilities to develop an educational plan that includes accommodations for their unique learning practices while maintaining the critical aspects of the program. The authors present the management of a case of an anesthesia resident with a diagnosis of ADHD, the perspectives of the trainee, program director, clinical competency director, and the office of general counsel. This article also provides follow-up in the five years since completion of residency.
(C) 2015 by the Association of American Medical Colleges

Physical Limits on CPR Quality and Methods for Quality Improvement

Physical Limits on CPR Quality and Methods for Quality Improvement

This is interesting research suggesting that many people are not able to perform effective CPR because of the amount of force required. This researcher is working on this with the hope that the American Heart Association will start teaching people to do compressions with their foot, which is more effective and less exhausting. His data might be useful to someone with a disability who has been told that they cannot be a nurse without being certified in CPR.

Here’s a little more info if you’re interested:
http://www.slicc.org/ReSS_2013_030.pdf

EEOC Settles with Hospital that Refused Job Accommodation for Nurse with Cancer

Angel Medical Center to Pay $85,000 to Settle EEOC Disability Discrimination Suit
The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has settled a disability discrimination lawsuit with Angel Medical Center, Inc. of Franklin, NC. The hospital was charged with violating the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) by denying an employee an accommodation that would have allowed her to get cancer treatments while working full time. The hospital allegedly refused the accommodation request and then fired the nurse.

To learn more about the ADA and other laws that protect the rights of people with disabilities read “Disability.gov’s Guide to Disability Rights Laws.”

Accommodating the Communication Needs of Deaf-Blind Employees

Accommodating the Communication Needs of Deaf-Blind Employees
by
Teresa Goddard and Elisabeth Simpson, Job Accommodation Network, Volume 10, Issue 2, Second Quarter, 2012
When you think of an individual who is deaf-blind (also known as deaf-blindness, blind-deaf, dual sensory impaired, or combined vision and hearing loss), do you think of someone who is fully deaf and fully blind? Helen Keller might be an important historical figure that comes to mind. In reality, while there are individuals who are fully deaf and fully blind, many people who are deaf-blind have some usable vision and hearing. For example, some individuals may have grown up with some degree of vision loss and experienced a change in their hearing later in life, or vice versa. Other individuals may have been born with mild to moderate deficits in both vision and hearing. Others may have experienced trauma or illness at some point in their lives that resulted in both vision and hearing loss while older adults are likely to experience age-related vision and hearing impairments.