Accessible Hospitals and Medical Care Facilities – A Refresher Webinar

Source: Accessible Hospitals and Medical Care Facilities – A Refresher

This session will provide a refresher on the requirements in the ADA and ABA Accessibility standard for Hospitals and Long-Term Care facilities. The presenters will provide an in-depth review of the standards and design challenges in long-term care settings, including highlights from recent research. Additionally, strategies for success in the field that both comply with the standard and meet the needs of older adults and their caregivers will be discussed. This is a joint session presented by the Access Board and the AIA Codes and Standards Committee. Session participants are encouraged to submit questions in advance.

Link Checkers and Basic Accessibility Testers for Websites

Source: LiveWell RERC

Leighanne Davis, B.S.

Introduction

Ensuring website optimization and ease of use are goals of any developer. This holds especially true for organizations disseminating a lot of information to a variety of users from different backgrounds and with different ability levels. Broken links or missing alt text can be frustrating for some people with accessibility challenges. These also detract from the user experience. To mitigate these website errors or accidental exclusions, developers and even laymen can use various online resources to check the efficiency and ease of use of websites.

Download Web+Accessibility+Testing Report for resources and broad information on services offered and how these tools can also be used as a basic accessibility test.

Topics include:

• Programs for website testing

• Locations to download / use each program

• Recommendations

Include “Low-Tech” Options to Share Health Information with People with Disabilities

Source: New Hampshire Disability & Public Health Project (DPH) Data Briefs & Reports

Health and medical information is commonly shared via web sites, social media, smart phone apps, and even text messaging. However, these high tech options are not accessible to all people. Adults with disabilities in New Hampshire (NH) are significantly less likely than adults without disabilities to have access to information electronically.

Download Health Communication Needs: Low Tech Options

How to Make Healthcare Accessible for All

Source: University of Washington, Healthy Aging RRTC

Healthcare access is important for all individuals, especially for people with disabilities. However, people with disabilities don’t always receive the healthcare they need. Several barriers can make it harder for them to access critical healthcare services or build optimal working relationships with their providers. Fortunately, by being aware of these barriers, we can overcome them with changes in design, training, and policy.

Download How to Make Healthcare Accessible for All

Employers, looking for a roadmap to make your workplace is accessible to all?

Source: Accessible Technology Action Steps: A Guide for Employers

Looking for a roadmap to ensure that the technology in your workplace is accessible to all employees and job applicants? Visit: Partnership on Employment & Accessible Technology (PEAT)

Whether you’re just getting started on accessible technology or looking for more advanced guidance, PEAT offers resources that can help. Simply check out the Action Steps below, in any order.

Women with Disabilities Need Better Access to Preventive Cancer Screening

Source: University of New Hampshire, Disability and Public Health Project (NH UCEDD)

In NH, women with disabilities are significantly less likely than the general population to comply with breast and cervical cancer screening recommendations of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.  Preventive screenings are especially challenging for women with disabilities due to barriers, such as:

  • Lack of accessible health care facilities and medical equipment; and
  • Health care providers who lack cultural competence with disability and awareness of needed accommodation.

Download Disability & Women’s Health

Ensuring Accessibility of Health Care Facilities and Providers

Source: CMS.Gov & Florida Disability and Health Program

The CMS Office of Minority Health Issue Briefs offer insight and examination into a variety of health and health disparity topics. The briefs are a concise summary of a particular issue and examine policies that impact the quality of and access to health care for minority and disadvantaged populations. Issue Briefs evaluate CMS programs, including Medicare and Medicaid, to include recommendations and suggestions relating to the issue at hand.

Adults with disabilities are almost twice as likely as other adults to report unmet health care needs due to problems with the accessibility of a doctor’s office or clinic.9 Structural, financial, and cultural barriers persist for people with disabilities when trying to access care.10 Many individuals with mobility disabilities face difficulties locating or otherwise traveling a burdensome distance to physically accessible services.11 Providing equal access to health care for people with physical disabilities involves many factors including, but not limited to:

  • Facility access. This includes accessible routes from parking or bus stops into the building, accessible parking, accessible entry doors with the required clearance width, clear floor space, and maneuvering clearance, accessible restrooms, and accessible signage for people who are blind or have low vision.12
  • Health care services access. This includes accessible scales and exam tables to facilitate a medical exam, accessible treatment and diagnostic equipment (including infusion chairs, mammography machines, and radiology equipment), appropriate resources for individuals with visual and auditory disabilities, and staff trained to assess patient needs and safely help patients move in between and transfer on and off medical equipment.

Download Issue-Brief-Physical-AccessibilityBrief

Download: In-depth-guide-on-accessibility-for-healthcare-facilities