Medicaid Work Requirements – Legally Suspect

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Source: Medicaid Work Requirements – Legally Suspect

Executive Summary

Legal Director Jane Perkins, and Policy Analyst Ian McDonald detail why adding a work requirement to Medicaid is “legally suspect.” They explain that currently the Medicaid Act has four requirements that an individual must meet that do not include a mandatory work requirement. “A number of courts,” Perkins and McDonald write, “have recognized that states may not ‘add additional requirements for Medicaid eligibility’ that are not set forth in the Medicaid Act.” They also note that the purpose of Medicaid is to “furnish medical assistance to low-income individuals who cannot afford the costs of medically necessary services and to furnish ‘rehabilitation and other services to help [such individuals] attain or retain capability for independence or self-care. A mandatory work requirement is not medical assistance; it is not a service provided to Medicaid beneficiaries.”

Medicaid Work Requirements – Not a Healthy Choice

Executive SummaryIn an effort to win conservative members’ support for the Affordable Care Care Act repeal bill, House Republicans have added a work requirement for Medicaid to the measure. In this issue brief, NHeLP Managing Attorney of the DC office Mara Youdelman,  Legal Director Jane Perkins, and Policy Analyst Ian McDonald detail why such work requirements “run counter to the purpose of Medicaid.” They conclude, “Work requirements would stand Medicaid’s purpose on its head by creating barriers to coverage and the pathway to health that the coverage represents.”DOWNLOAD PUBLICATION

Source: Medicaid Work Requirements – Not a Healthy Choice

Compare Proposals to Replace The Affordable Care Act | The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation

President Donald Trump and Republicans in Congress have committed to repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act (ACA). How do their replacement proposals compare to the ACA? How do they compare to each other?Plans available for comparison:The American Health Care Act as introduced by the House Republican leadership, March 6, 2017 (PDF)The Affordable Care Act, 2010 (PDF)More plans for comparison:Rep. Tom Price’s Empowering Patients First Act, 2015 (PDF)House Speaker Paul Ryan’s A Better Way: Our Vision for a More Confident America, 2016 (PDF)Sen. Bill Cassidy’s Patient Freedom Act, 2017 (PDF)Sen. Rand Paul’s Obamacare Replacement Act, 2017 (PDF)House Discussion Draft, February 10, 2017 (PDF)Click the column header to view available plans to compare. You may compare up to 3 plans.

Source: Compare Proposals to Replace The Affordable Care Act | The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation

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Community Outreach Collaboratives | National Disability Navigator Resource Collaborative

Community Outreach Collaboratives The NDNRC has funded eighteen Community Outreach Collaboratives (COCs) for the third year of open enrollment – expanding on the eleven COCs who were funded in year two. The COCs will increase collaborations in the community, dissemination and outreach efforts and enrollment of people with disabilities in the ACA. The COCs have two primary tasks: 1) build cross-disability collaborations with other disability organizations; and 2) have the cross-disability collaboration work

Source: Community Outreach Collaboratives | National Disability Navigator Resource Collaborative

Partnering to Transform Healthcare with People with Disabllities (PATH-PWD) – Improving Acute, Primary and Transitional Health care with People with Disabilities | | Rush University

Research Team Sarah H. Ailey Principal Investigator Rush CON Molly Bathje Co-Investigator Rush CHS Tamar Heller Co-Investigator University of Illinois Award Period 6/1/16 – 5/31/17 Funding Source Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) R13 Conference grant

Source: Partnering to Transform Healthcare with People with Disabllities (PATH-PWD) – Improving Acute, Primary and Transitional Health care with People with Disabilities | | Rush University

Compare Proposals to Replace The Affordable Care Act | The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation

President Donald Trump and Republicans in Congress have committed to repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act (ACA). How do their replacement proposals compare to the ACA? How do they compare to each other? Includes proposals from Tom Price, Paul Ryan, Bill Cassidy, and Rand Paul

Source: Compare Proposals to Replace The Affordable Care Act | The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation

Several Million Healthcare Workers Needed by 2020

Several Million Healthcare Workers Needed by 2020

Regardless of the fate of the Affordable Care Act, the United States will need 5.6 million new healthcare workers by 2020, according to a study.

The study, by researchers at Georgetown University’s Center on Education and Workforce, also found that 4.6 million of those new workers will need education beyond high school.

“In healthcare, there are really two labor markets — professional and support,” Anthony P. Carnevale, the report’s lead author and director of the Center on Education and Workforce, said in a news release. “Professional jobs demand postsecondary training and advanced degrees, while support jobs demand high school and some colleges.”

There is “minimal mobility” between the two, Carnevale said, “and the pay gap is enormous — the average professional worker makes 2.5 times as much as the average support worker.”

Among the study’s findings:

  • In 2008, 80% of entry-level RNs had at least an associate’s degree, up from 37% in 1980.
  • Rising degree requirements in nursing may be crowding out disadvantaged minorities, according to the authors: 51% of white nurses under age 40 have bachelor’s degrees, compared with 46% of Hispanic nurses and 44% of African-American nurses.
  • Healthcare has the largest number and proportion of foreign-born and foreign-trained workers of any industry in the U.S. Among healthcare workers, 22% are foreign-born, compared with 13% of all workers nationwide. Most foreign-born nurses come from the Philippines, India and China.
  • Only 20% of healthcare professional and technical occupations earn less than $38,000 a year, and almost 50% earn more than $60,000.
  • More than 70% of healthcare support workers make less than $30,000 per year, but that percentage is still better than most available alternatives for workers of that skill and education level, according to the report.
  • Healthcare successfully competes for science and engineering talent. Because the healthcare, science and technology fields tend to require similar skills, healthcare programs at the associate and bachelor’s level often are appealing alternatives for science and engineering students.
  • One difference between the fields: People in healthcare jobs tend to value forming social bonds, while people who gravitate to science, technology and engineering occupations place a greater emphasis on achievement and independence, the researchers found.

To read a PDF of the executive summary of the report, visit http://bit.ly/MBpzig. To read a PDF of the full report, visit http://bit.ly/N2RUfN.