1. (F), 2. (T), 3. (F), 4. (F), 5. (T), 6. (F), 7. (T), 8. (T), 9. (F), 10. (F), 11. (T), 12. (T), 13. (F), 14. (F), 15. (F), 16. (T), 17. (F), 18. (F), 19. (F), 20. (T)

1. A safe way to set aside funds is to leave money to another adult son or daughter to be used on behalf of their sibling with a disability.
F

2. Many older caregivers (parents and other relatives) of adults with developmental disabilities living at home have been caregivers all of their lives.
T

3. The majority of families caring for an adult son or daughter at home have made residential, legal, and financial plans for their son or daughter with a developmental disability that kick in after the parents die.
F

4. Social Security regulations require parents at age 65 to give up some of the benefits of their son or daughter with a disability to continue to live a home.
F

5. Outreach can often mean different things - in the developmental disabilities system it means casefinding and in the aging network it means information and referral.
T

6. All attorneys who do estate planning can set up the appropriate and well designed legal arrangements to ensure the person with a disability's future well-being.
F

7. Some older parents (or other relative caregivers) find that they have dual caregiving burdens - caring for both their son or daughter with a developmental disability and a spouse who may be ill or infirm.
T
8. The main difference between older caregivers of adults with developmental disabilities and caregivers from the "sandwich generation" is that sandwich generation caregivers are taking care of older parents and the caregivers of adults with developmental disabilities are taking care of their children.
T

9. Adults with disabilities who are living with their families can not legally make any decisions for themselves.
F

10. When renting an apartment from a landlord an adult with a developmental disability is not legally able to sign a rental agreement or contract.
F

11. The Older Americans Act authorizes area agencies on aging to give priority for services to older persons providing care and support to persons with developmental disabilities.
T

12. Grandparents often become the primary caregiver to a child with a developmental disability because the child's mother or father has died, has left the area, are incompacitated, or have relinquished custody.
T

13. Because they live with at home with their parents (or other relative caregivers), adults with developmental disabilities are not eligible for any federal assistance programs (such as Medicaid).
F

14. All adults with developmental disabilities should have a legal guardianship established.
F

15. Grandparents, caring for a grandchild with a developmental disability, are recognized as the "legal parent" for the child by educational and social services authorities.
F

16. The National Family Caregiver Support Program requires that area agencies on aging provide information to caregivers about available local services, and this would include information about local disability services.
T

17. As older parents age, they find it not really any harder to provide personal care to their adult son or daughter with severe intellectual and physical disabilities.
F

18. Any type of trust that a family sets up for their adult son or daughter with a disability will protect his or her government benefits.
F

19. Older parents (or other relative caregivers) do not have to worry about what money they leave their adult son or daughter with a developmental disability because federal Medicaid rules disregard any inheritances.
F

20. The Older Americans Act permits local nutrition sites to offer meals to adults with a developmental disability, who are under age 60, if they accompany their parents or other caregiver.
T