How Can I Find a Good Amplified Stethoscope to Hear Soft Sounds

How Can I Find a Good Amplified Stethoscope to Hear Soft Sounds?

As you probably know, there are many different types of stethoscopes available to student and health professionals. Sometimes it takes trial and error to find the right one, so it may be worthwhile to order a few and check the return policy so the ones that don’t work as well can be returned.

The best source of information on the various stethoscopes can be found at AMPHL Stethoscope Information. Here you will find articles on stethoscopes as well as the various features available. Some work with hearing aids, some with cochlear implants, etc. These websites have additional information on “The Best Amplified Stethoscope for Hard of Hearing Medical Professionals” and “Technical Considerations in Using Stethoscopes

AMPHL Forums
AMPHL (Association of Medical Professionals With Hearing Losses) provides information, promotes advocacy and mentorship, and creates a network for individuals with hearing loss interested in or working in health care fields.

If you have specific questions, join the AMPHL forums and ask other healthcare professionals with hearing loss what they have used and what works and does not work for them. 

What if I Need Assistance with Personal Needs when I am at School or Work in the Clinical Setting?

What if I Need Assistance with Personal Needs when I am at School or Work in the Clinical Setting?

This may be a personal assistant issue and not your school’s or employer’s responsibility.

Below are some specific suggestions on organizations and resources to increase your awareness about your rights and responsibilities:




Disclaimer: The National Organization of Nurses with Disabilities (NOND) does not offer legal advice but NOND does offer resources to help you understand your rights, protections, and responsibilities within various Disability Rights Laws.

As a Nurse or Nursing Student Using a Wheelchair, How Can I Perform a “Head-to-Toe” Physical Exam?

As a Nurse or Nursing Student Using a Wheelchair, How Can I Perform a “Head-to-Toe” Physical Exam?

You also may ask your patient to sit in a chair or non-rolling stool for part of the exam, lower the table or bed so that you can reach your patient more easily. Remember that many nurses complete the exam on the patient’s front side first, progressing to the back, which would require you to reposition yourself less frequently.

See how one nursing student using a wheelchair adapted to situations like this in the film entitled Open the Door, Get ‘Em a Locker. In addition, here are some specific suggestions on organizations and resources to increase your awareness about your rights and responsibilities:


If I Use a Wheelchair, How Can I Care for Patients with Contact Precautions?
If I Use a Wheelchair, How Can I Complete a Student Rotation in the Operating Suite?



Disclaimer: The National Organization of Nurses with Disabilities (NOND) does not offer legal advice but NOND does offer resources to help you understand your rights, protections, and responsibilities within various Disability Rights Laws.

Can I Be a Nurse if I Have a History of Chemical Dependency (Drugs or Alcohol)?

Can I Be a Nurse if I Have a History of Chemical Dependency (Drugs or Alcohol)?

If you no longer actively use drugs or alcohol, you may qualify as disabled.

Below are some specific suggestions on organizations and resources to increase your awareness about your rights and responsibilities:

 


Disclaimer: The National Organization of Nurses with Disabilities (NOND) does not offer legal advice but NOND does offer resources to help you understand your rights, protections, and responsibilities within various Disability Rights Laws.

If I Use a Wheelchair, How Can I Care for Patients with Contact Precautions?

If I Use a Wheelchair, How Can I Care for Patients with Contact Precautions?

If you are a student, is the nursing program willing to accept your theoretical knowledge of the skill and a learning laboratory demonstration of your competence, in lieu of actually carrying out the skill in the clinical setting? For many students, not just those with disabilities, catheterizing a male patient or inserting a nasogastric tube are approached in that way because simulated, theoretical activities still allow the student to meet program objectives when few opportunities exist to complete the skill in the clinical setting.


A second approach is to disinfect the wheels of the chair and spread a bed sheet over the wheelchair (“gown” the chair as well as the nurse) before entering the room. Discard the sheet, along with the other protection, and repeat the disinfectant when leaving the room. Or you could leave a facility wheelchair in that room, transferring into it upon entry and out of it when you leave the room.

Although they can safely complete the task, most nurses using wheelchairs will choose to work at a job or in a setting where this activity is not necessary. See how one nursing student using a wheelchair adapted to situations like this in the film entitled Open the Door, Get ‘Em a Locker. In addition, here are some specific suggestions on organizations and resources to increase your awareness about your rights and responsibilities:


If I Use a Wheelchair, How Can I Complete a Student Rotation in the Operating Suite?



Disclaimer: The National Organization of Nurses with Disabilities (NOND) does not offer legal advice but NOND does offer resources to help you understand your rights, protections, and responsibilities within various Disability Rights Laws.

If I Use a Wheelchair, How Can I Complete a Student Rotation in the Operating Suite?

If I Use a Wheelchair, How Can I Complete a Student Rotation in the Operating Suite?

First of all, does the nursing program absolutely require this rotation or could you meet learning objectives in another setting that would be less difficult logistically? If they are unwilling to let you move to another setting, you and your instructor can talk with the OR manager about a couple of options. You can disinfect your chair before entering the suite each day or you can use a chair kept in the suite for other purposes. The chair may not fit you well and be somewhat uncomfortable, especially if you consider your chair an extension of your body, but it will get you through the few days most programs allocate to this specialty.

See how one nursing student using a wheelchair adapted to situations like this in the film entitled Open the Door, Get ‘Em a Locker. In addition, here are some specific suggestions on organizations and resources to increase your awareness about your rights and responsibilities:


If I Use a Wheelchair, How Can I Care for Patients with Contact Precautions?



Disclaimer: The National Organization of Nurses with Disabilities (NOND) does not offer legal advice but NOND does offer resources to help you understand your rights, protections, and responsibilities within various Disability Rights Laws.

I Can No Longer Physically Complete the Clinical Portion of a Refresher Course?

I Can No Longer Physically Complete the Clinical Portion of a Refresher Course?

Work with your refresher program and the Disability Services Officer to look for clinical settings where you could display your skill proficiency, taking into account that you need accommodations.

In addition, here are some specific suggestions on organizations and resources to increase your awareness about your rights and responsibilities:




Disclaimer: The National Organization of Nurses with Disabilities (NOND) does not offer legal advice but NOND does offer resources to help you understand your rights, protections, and responsibilities within various Disability Rights Laws.

How Can I Find a Nursing Job if I Stutter?

How Can I Find a Nursing Job if I Stutter?

Please explore our website for resources:

  • For protection, advocacy, and legal assistance, contact your state National Disability Rights Network. Be sure to click on your state so that you get relevant and timely information. Also check out your rights under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.
  • Please explore our website for resources in regard to education, advocacy, and work.
  • For assistance with the ADA, contact the Americans with Disabilities Act Technical Assistance Centers. Tell them what is happening and ask about interviewing resources that would support you and ask to practice responses with them that would follow discriminatory statements from employers.
  • Learning about the ADA Amendments Act of 2008 will help you to understand how the ADAAA broadens coverage for many individuals.
  • Connections with people with disabilities in your community, contact your local Center for Independent Living. Find a nurse mentor with a disability in your area who will let you practice interviewing skills and give you suggestions; contact former faculty/instructors as advocates to open doors, and become a strong advocate for yourself by knowing your rights and responsibilities under the ADA. During future interviews, de-emphasize your speech impairment and focus on skills, knowledge, and motivation.
  • Information about how to get a job, contact State Vocational Rehabilitation Program or the Job Accommodation Network.




Disclaimer: The National Organization of Nurses with Disabilities (NOND) does not offer legal advice but NOND does offer resources to help you understand your rights, protections, and responsibilities within various Disability Rights Laws.

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