New Hampshire Adults with Disabilities Need Better Diabetes Prevention Care

Source: New Hampshire Disability & Public Health Project (DPH) Data Briefs & Reports

In New Hampshire, adults with mobility and cognitive limitations are significantly more likely to experience diabetes (26%) than adults with no disability (9%).1 The disparity in diabetes prevalence results in higher costs to Medicaid programs and poorer health outcomes and quality of life for people with disabilities.2  Promising diabetes prevention care for adults with disabilities includes accessible and inclusive health promotion.

Several factors contribute to a higher risk of diabetes, including:

• Unhealthy eating habits that result, in part, from uninformed and limited food choices;

• Lack of physical activity due to social, environmental, and behavioral barriers; and

• Lack of knowledge and support to address risk factors for diabetes.

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New Health & Disability E-learning Module for Health Department Staff

Source: NACCHO’s Health and Disability Program

NACCHO’s Health and Disability Program is proud to announce a new online e-learning module titled, “Health and Disability 101: Training for Health Department Employees.” The purpose of this training is to educate health department staff about the benefits of including people with disabilities in all public health programs, products and services. To access this free training, click here

This course can be accessed through NACCHO University, NACCHO’s learning management platform. In order to view the course, you will need to create a MyNACCHO account by clicking the “sign in” button on the top right. Follow the prompts to create a new account and you will be re-directed back to the NACCHO University homepage. When signed-in, you can access your account by clicking on your name on the top right.

Pain and pain assessment in people with intellectual disability: Issues and challenges in practice

Source: 2017 – British Journal of Learning Disabilities – Wiley Online Library

Authors: Owen Doody, Maria E. Bailey

Abstract

Accessible summary

Pain is difficult to identify when people cannot communicate. If pain is not identified, it cannot be managed and causes stress. Pain assessment is essential in order to identify pain. Pain assessment requires a combination of knowledge, health assessments and observations.

Abstract

Background Individuals with intellectual disability experience the same chronic diseases and conditions as the general population, but are more likely to have physical and psychological co-morbidities, resulting in a higher risk of experiencing pain and having more frequent or severe pain.

Method This position paper aims to highlight the importance of pain assessment for people with intellectual disability. Results As people with intellectual disability live within the community and/or remain in the family home, they are accessing a wide range of healthcare services. This necessitates that nurses across all care settings are knowledgeable regarding appropriate/alternative pain assessment methods for people with intellectual disability. While many pain assessment tools are available for use with the intellectual disability population, they are often not well established or infrequently used to establish their validity.

Conclusion Although self-report is the gold standard in pain assessment, pain assessment for people with intellectual disability is often challenging as they may be unable to self-report their pain due to their levels of communication or cognitive ability. Assessment requires a combination of approaches amalgamating: pain assessment, health assessment and observation of behaviours.

“Tell me what they do to my body”: A survey to find out what information people with learning disabilities want with their medications

Fifty-eight people completed the questionnaire. Many of them said they did not get enough information about their medicine. Most people wanted easy-read leaflets and pictures.

Authors: Rebecca Fish, Chris Hatton, Umesh Chauhan

Source: British Journal of Learning Disabilities – 2017 – Wiley Online Library

Abstract

Accessible summary

We gave a questionnaire to self-advocates who were attending a conference. The questionnaire asked them how they felt about the information they get with their medicine. Fifty-eight people completed the questionnaire. Many of them said they did not get enough information about their medicine. Most people wanted easy-read leaflets and pictures. There are many different places to find easy-read information on the internet. We think they should be collected and checked. We also think that doctors and chemists need to spend more time with people to explain about medicines.

Abstract

Background Previous research has found that people with learning disabilities are not given prescription information that is tailored to their needs. We wanted to find out people’s information requirements.

Materials and Methods A questionnaire was co-produced by the authors and consultants with learning disabilities. It asked what information people received from their GP and pharmacist about medications. The questionnaire was circulated at a self-advocacy conference in the North of England. Fifty-eight self-advocates completed the questionnaire.

Results Information from GPs and pharmacists was mainly instructional, referring to when and how to take the medicine and dosage. Most respondents struggled to read the leaflets and remember verbal information. Many wanted the information in easy-read format, and some wanted pictures or diagrams as well. A key theme was that health professionals often talked only to carers or support workers rather than involving the patient directly, and some respondents disclosed that they were not informed about side effects or alternative medications.

Conclusions Health professionals should take time to discuss health issues and medication with the individual rather than only with carers. This could be facilitated by providing information in an accessible format.

Internet and cell phone usage patterns among young adults with intellectual disabilities

Source: JARID

Authors Cristina Jenaro, Noelia Flores, Maribel Cruz, Ma Carmen Pérez, Vanessa Vega, Víctor A Torres

First published: 24 July 2017

Abstract

Background

The risks and opportunities associated with the use of technologies are of growing research interest. Patterns of technology usage illuminate these opportunities and risks. However, no studies have assessed the usage patterns (frequency, duration, and intensity) and related factors in young people with intellectual disabilities.

Methods

Questionnaires on Internet and cell phone usage patterns, the Internet Over-Use Scale and the Cell-Phone Over-Use Scale, as well as the Beck Depression Inventory were filled out in one-on-one interviews of 216 youth with intellectual disabilities.

Results

Young people with disabilities make more social and recreational rather than educational use of these tools, and show higher rates of excessive use of both technologies than a comparison group of 410 young people without disabilities. Also, their overuse is associated with other unhealthy behaviors.

Conclusion

The framework of support needs of people with disabilities should be considered to promote healthy Internet and cell phone use.

Management and prevalence of long-term conditions in primary health care for adults with intellectual disabilities compared with the general population: A population-based cohort study

Source: JARID

Sally-Ann Cooper, Laura Hughes-McCormack, Nicola Greenlaw, Alex McConnachie, Linda Allan, Marion Baltzer, Laura McArthur, Angela Henderson, Craig Melville, Paula McSkimming, Jill Morrison First published: 20 July 2017

Abstract

Background In the UK, general practitioners/family physicians receive pay for performance on management of long-term conditions, according to best-practice indicators.

Method Management of long-term conditions was compared between 721 adults with intellectual disabilities and the general population (n = 764,672). Prevalence of long-term conditions was determined, and associated factors were investigated via logistic regression analyses.

Results Adults with intellectual disabilities received significantly poorer management of all long-term conditions on 38/57 (66.7%) indicators. Achievement was high (75.1%–100%) for only 19.6% of adults with intellectual disabilities, compared with 76.8% of the general population. Adults with intellectual disabilities had higher rates of epilepsy, psychosis, hypothyroidism, asthma, diabetes and heart failure. There were no clear associations with neighbourhood deprivation.

Conclusions Adults with intellectual disabilities receive poorer care, despite conditions being more prevalent. The imperative now is to find practical, implementable means of supporting the challenges that general practices face in delivering equitable care.

The Peter and Elizabeth C. Tower Foundation | Intellectual Disabilities

To be eligible for funding, organizations must be located in or primarily serve residents in one of the following geographic areas:
Barnstable, Dukes, Essex, and Nantucket Counties of Massachusetts; Erie and Niagara Counties of New York.

Source: The Peter and Elizabeth C. Tower Foundation | Intellectual Disabilities

The Tower Foundation will now offer three opportunities per year to apply for funding for its Core Programs and Services grants (in Intellectual DisabilitiesLearning DisabilitiesMental Health, and Substance Use Disorders) as well as for Technology and Small Grants. This change from an annual cycle will ensure a shorter process that will help to lessen the administrative burden on grantees.  Learn more here.

For our Intellectual Disabilities category, we have identified four key goals:

  1. Children with intellectual disabilities are identified early and receive services that meet their evolving needs.
  2. Young people with intellectual disabilities are engaged in meaningful, social, vocational, and educational pursuits.
  3. Families understand intellectual disabilities and secure needed supports.
  4. Communities embrace persons with intellectual disabilities and provide them with a full range of supports and opportunities to engage in community life.

Preferred Strategies

While open to creative approaches, some preferred strategies for supporting our goals include:

  • Screening and Assessment
  • Community-Based Education and Supports
    – Community and Professional Education
    – Family Supports
  • Transition/Service Navigation

For More Information

If you are interested in submitting a grant application, please see our 2017 Core Programs and Services Guidelines.  Subscribe to our mailing list to be notified when guidelines are posted.

Developing a medical picture book for reducing venipuncture distress in preschool-aged children

Source: International Journal of Nursing Practice

Ying Tsao, Hui-Chen Kuo, Hsui-Chuan Lee and Shuenn-Jiun Yiin
Version of Record online: 20 JUL 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/ijn.12569

Abstract

Aim

Distress associated with needle-related procedures is a major concern in preschool-aged children nursing. This study developed a medical picture book for supporting preschool-aged children facing a venipuncture and determined the effectiveness of such a book intervention in decreasing behavioural distress.

Methods

The picture book was designed in 3 stages: developing stories on medical situations, penning the text, and drafting the book. We conducted a quasiexperimental study to examine the effectiveness of the book. The behavioural distress of the control and picture book groups were assessed before, during, and after the intervention by using the Observational Scale of Behavioral Distress-Revised (OSBD-R).

Results

We created a 12-page picture book, Sick Rui-Rui Bear, in which cartoon characters were depicted undergoing venipunctures, as a guide for vein injection and for facilitating positive venipuncture outcomes in preschool-aged children. Over time, the OSBD-R scores of the picture book group were significantly lower than those of the control group (P < .001).

Conclusion

We recommend the picture book be routinely read and used during venipunctures to decrease procedural distress in preschool-aged children.

SUMMARY STATEMENT
What is already known about this topic?

  • Venipunctures may cause varying levels of distress in preschool-aged children. Pain is experienced during venipunctures, which often terrifies children and prolongs the intravenous procedures and the associated displeasure.
  • Although some picture books have been used to describe the medical procedures to children, to our knowledge, the process of venipunctures has not been explained for preschool-aged children.

What this paper adds: (research findings/key new information)

  • We created a picture book titled Sick Rui-Rui Bear, in which cartoon characters were depicted as receiving venipunctures. This 12-page book is a guide to vein injection and is aimed at facilitating excellent venipuncture outcomes for preschool-aged children.
  • We adopted analytical statistics to compare the behavioural distress scores of the control and venipuncture picture book groups. Results showed that the picture book group had significantly lower scores of OSBD-R over time than that of the control group.

The implications of this paper: (how findings influence or can be used to change policy/practice/research/education)

  • When administering a venipuncture, nurses should be concerned about the distress in preschool-aged children. Interaction among nurses, parents, and preschool-aged children can be stimulated by providing them with a venipuncture picture book, thereby enabling preschool-aged children to face such a medical treatment experience.
  • Nurses can use a venipuncture picture book to reduce distress in preschool-aged children during vein injection.

 

 

Advocacy Skill Building Toolkit – Rural RTC

Advocacy Skill Building Toolkit

Source: Advocacy Skill Building Toolkit – RTC:Rural

This toolkit is a guide for Centers for Independent Living and others to conduct interactive and engaging workshops to facilitate the development of advocacy skills of emerging Independent Living leaders and youth with disabilities. It describes how to introduce advocacy through the facilitation of unique activities and discussions, identifying issues of importance, and putting advocacy skills into practice. A unique approach presented in this toolkit is the use of improv to introduce, invite, and engage others into and with the world of advocacy.

Using improv hones communication and public speaking skills, stimulates fast thinking, and encourages engagement with ideas, all skills that are important for effective advocacy. Improv also provides a supportive environment that allows participants to take risks, try out new ideas, and build their confidence. The activities incorporate different learning styles, and can easily be modified to accommodate everyone.

An important part of advocacy, no matter if the goal is to help one person or many, is establishing a confident voice, developed and supported by a community of peer support. This workshop and accompanying toolkit materials give participants the opportunity to explore their voices, build confidence, and display their skills both verbally as well as in written form. The intent is to provide a safe space among peers and trusted facilitators to introduce the concept of both group and self-advocacy.

Crisis Trends – Crisis Text Line

Crisis Trends aims to empower journalists, researchers, school administrators, parents and all citizens to understand the crises Americans face so we can work together to prevent future crises from happening.

Source: Crisis Trends – Crisis Text Line

Explore trends across texter conversations across all states in the U.S. http://crisistrends.org/

Crisis Text Line: Text 741-741 from anywhere in the USA, anytime, about any type of crisis.

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