Compounded Disparities: Health Equity at the Intersection of Disability, Race, and Ethnicity

Source: Compounded Disparities: Health Equity at the Intersection of Disability, Race, and Ethnicity – NEW : Health and Medicine Division

DOWNLOAD PDF: Compounded Disparities – Intersection of Disabilities Race and Ethnicity

‘It’s Not Easy’: School Nurse Pain Assessment Practices for Students with Special Needs

Brenna L. Quinn PhD, RN, NCSN

Assistant Professor, Susan & Alan Solomont School of Nursing, Email: Brenna_Quinn@uml.edu

Abstract

Assessing pain in children with special needs presents unique challenges for school nurses, as no evidence-based or clinical standards to guide practices have been established for use in the school setting. Additionally, school nurse staffing has not kept pace with the growth in the population of children with special needs, which has increased by 60% since 2002. The aim of this study was to explore school nurses’ pain assessment practices for students with special needs. A cross-sectional study was conducted via the web. Participants/Subjects: Of 3,071 special needs school nurses invited, 27% participated (n = 825). STATA13 was used to analyze descriptive statistics, while content analysis was performed in NVIVO 10. The majority of participants assessed pain in students with special needs using objective assessments (97.34%) and consultations with teachers (91.09%) and parents (88.64%). School nurses utilize pain assessment methods used previously in other practice areas, and rated pain assessment practices at the low benchmark of adequate. Overall, school nurses assess pain by selecting approaches that are best matched to the abilities of the student with special needs. When assessing students with special needs, nurses should utilize objective clinical assessments, teacher consultations, and parent input scales. In addition to continuing education, policies facilitating lower nurse-to-student ratios are needed to improve pain assessment practices in the school setting. Research to understand the perspectives of nurses, teachers, parents, and students is needed to support the creation of evidence-based policies and procedures.

PMID: 27105572; DOI:10.1016/j.pmn.2016.01.005

Blind Spot: Understanding a disabled son’s vulnerability as a state of grace

American Journal of Nursing

Blind Spot: Understanding a disabled son’s vulnerability as a state of grace by Diane Stonecipher, BSN, RN

“His IQ may have been devastated, but his EQ has not. He has lived 25 years on this earth and his experiences are valuable and visceral to him.”

Diane Stonecipher is a nurse living and working in Texas. Contact author: bobcipher@yahoo.com. 

National Council for Aging Care’s Comprehensive Guide on Exercising for Seniors

Comprehensive Guide on Exercising for Seniors

When people think about their later years, they usually imagine a life freed from work or career commitments. They hope, too, that this new freedom will allow them to give their full attention to family, friends, and the activities they feel most passionate about. Making this dream a reality, however, requires health and independence, which in turn require a renewed commitment to staying healthy in general and to maintaining that health through exercise.

The good news, though, is that exercise confers all the same benefits to seniors that it does to those earlier in life, including increased longevity, improved mental clarity, a boost in energy, and greater strength to meet the physical demands of daily living. This is true even if you don’t start exercising until your later years. And while older people tend to become more sedentary as retirement and the challenges of old age restrict their activities, that doesn’t mean that you can’t make a reasonable course of exercise a part of your life or the life of a loved one.

With that in mind, here is everything you need to know about keeping an active lifestyle well into your senior years.

Beginning with Disability: A Primer (Paperback) – Routledge

While there are many introductions to disability and disability studies, most presume an advanced academic knowledge of a range of subjects. Beginning with Disability is the first introductory primer for disability studies aimed at first year students in two- and four-year colleges. This volume of essays across disciplines—including education, sociology, communications, psychology, social sciences, and humanities—features accessible, readable, and relatively short chapters that do not require specialized knowledge.

Source: Beginning with Disability: A Primer (Paperback) – Routledge

Lennard Davis, along with a team of consulting editors, has compiled a number of blogs, vlogs, and other videos to make the materials more relatable and vivid to students. “Subject to Debate” boxes spotlight short pro and con pieces on controversial subjects that can be debated in class or act as prompts for assignments.

XCEL Training

XCEL is designed to give quick tips in an entertaining way to reception/support staff who interact with people with developmental disabilities in healthcare settings. It comprises of a 7 minute animated video, a fact sheet, and highlights other resources that are helpful.

 

Source: Florida Center for Inclusive Communities (FCIC)

XCEL Training

Link Checkers and Basic Accessibility Testers for Websites

Source: LiveWell RERC

Leighanne Davis, B.S.

Introduction

Ensuring website optimization and ease of use are goals of any developer. This holds especially true for organizations disseminating a lot of information to a variety of users from different backgrounds and with different ability levels. Broken links or missing alt text can be frustrating for some people with accessibility challenges. These also detract from the user experience. To mitigate these website errors or accidental exclusions, developers and even laymen can use various online resources to check the efficiency and ease of use of websites.

Download Web+Accessibility+Testing Report for resources and broad information on services offered and how these tools can also be used as a basic accessibility test.

Topics include:

• Programs for website testing

• Locations to download / use each program

• Recommendations

Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center: Improving Systems, Practices and Outcomes for Young Children with Disabilities and their Families

Source: ECTACenter.org : The Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center : Improving Systems, Practices and Outcomes for Young Children with Disabilities and their Families

Most recent additions to this page:

 National Child Traumatic Stress Network (2017) – established to improve access to care, treatment, and services for traumatized children and adolescents exposed to traumatic events. This resource includes descriptions of each type of trauma and evidence-based treatments that work.

 Caring for Children in a Disaster (2017) – This collection of resources from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offers simple steps to protect children in emergency situations and help meet their needs during and after a disaster.

Related pages:

State Community Health Worker Models – NASHP

As states transform their health systems many are turning to Community Health Workers (CHWs) to tackle some of the most challenging aspects of health improvement, such as facilitating care coordination, enhancing access to community-based services, and addressing social determinants of health.

Source: State Community Health Worker Models – NASHP

While state definitions vary, CHWs are typically frontline workers who are trusted members of and/or have a unique and intimate understanding of the communities they serve. This map highlights state activity to integrate CHWs into evolving health care systems in key areas such as financing, education and training, certification, and state definitions, roles and scope of practice. The map includes enacted state CHW legislation and provides links to state CHW associations and other leading organizations working on CHW issues in states.

1 3 4 5 6 7 22