BUILDing Strong Foundations Farm to Early Care and Education: Working to Equalize Health and Education Outcomes

Source: BUILD Initiative

By Lacy Stephens, Farm to Early Care and Education Associate, National Farm to School Network

Good nutrition and good educational outcomes for young children are inextricably linked. Yet, there is little consistency in terms of the quality of the food that is offered in early care settings. Given that approximately 60 percent of US children under the age of six spend time in some sort of childcare (or non-parental care) setting on a weekly basis, and typically eat breakfast and lunch (and possibly an afternoon snack) at these sites, ensuring the quality of the food is essential.

The Good Food, Great Kids policy overview and case studies, developed in partnership with the National Farm to School Network and the BUILD Initiative, is intended both to share a broad spectrum of existing information about various experiences in building farm-to-ECE supportive policies and to point out how forging greater connections between current policies and the work of farm to ECE can benefit early childcare centers, children, and families.

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The Community Guide to Adult Oral Health Program Implementation

Source: The Oral Health Website

Download Oral Health Guide

The Community Guide to Adult Oral Health Program Implementation (Oral Health Guide), along with the corresponding online database of community-based oral health programs, aims to help groups at the state and local levels start or enhance their own oral health programs for older adults. Here, community-based entities can find key tips, case studies, interactive tools, and other sources of support for creating cost-effective, sustainable programs. The Oral Health Guide can help you replicate or expand an existing program or take steps to design and implement a new program. In addition, recognizing the connection between oral health and overall health, the Oral Health Guide contains advice and links to resources concerning interprofessional collaboration to serve older adults’ oral health needs.

The Oral Health Guide begins with an introduction and includes the following eight key steps to implementation:

  1. Conduct a Needs Assessment: Assessing the specific oral health needs of older adults in your community is a vital first step to implementation.
  2. Develop a Vision, Mission, and Goals: Developing your program’s vision, mission, and goals helps ensure that staff and community partners are working toward a common objective.
  3. Establish Partnerships: Collaborating with a variety of organizations can help strengthen the planning process for a community-based oral health program for older adults and can expand the program’s impact.
  4. Design the Program: As you define your program’s scope, you might choose to replicate, or copy, an existing program; adapt an existing program; or design an entirely new program.
  5. Finance the Program: Obtaining funding is an important step to starting your program and sustaining it over the long term.
  6. Implement the Program: You must consider several key steps as you proceed from planning and preparation to program operations and services delivery.
  7. Evaluate the Program: During the early planning stages of your program, before you start serving older adults, developing an evaluation plan that reflects your program’s vision and mission is imperative.
  8. Ensure Sustainability: Sharing your program results with partners, funders, and other community stakeholders is fundamental to maintain existing relationships, attract support and buy-in from your community, and thereby ensure your program’s long-term sustainability.

The Oral Health Guide also contains an appendix of funding sources for existing oral health programs and acknowledgments for individuals who helped develop the Oral Health Guide.

You can also download a hardcopy version of the Oral Health Guide (PDF, 1.9 MB).

Health, United States, 2016

Source: CDC.gov

Download Health, United States, 2016: Chartbook on Longterm Trends in Health

Health, United States, 2016 is the 40th report on the health status of the nation and is submitted by the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services to the President and the Congress of the United States in compliance with Section 308 of the Public Health Service Act. This report was compiled by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

The Health, United States series presents an annual overview of national trends in health statistics. The report contains a Chartbook that assesses the nation’s health by presenting trends and current information on selected measures of morbidity, mortality, health care utilization and access, health risk factors, prevention, health insurance, and personal health care expenditures. This year’s Chartbook focuses on long-term trends in health. The report also contains 114 Trend Tables organized around four major subject areas: health status and determinants, health care utilization, health care resources, and health care expenditures. A companion report—Health, United States: In Brief—features information extracted from the full report. The complete report and related data products are available on the Health, United States website at: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/hus.htm.

Centers Serving High Percentages of Young Hispanic Children Compare Favorably to Other Centers on Key Predictors of Quality

Source: Child Trends

Julia Mendez, Danielle Crosby, Lina Guzman, and Michael López (June 2017)

Download Predictors-of-Quality

Why research on low-income Hispanic children and families matters Hispanic or Latino children currently make up roughly 1 in 4 of all children in the United States, and by 2050 are projected to make up 1 in 3, similar to the number of white children. Given this increase, how Hispanic children fare will have a profound impact on the social and economic well-being of the country as a whole.

Notably, though, 5.7 million Hispanic children, or one third of all Hispanic children in the United States, are in poverty, more than in any other racial/ethnic group.

Nearly two thirds of Hispanic children live in low-income families, defined as having incomes of less than two times the federal poverty level.

Despite their high levels of economic need, Hispanics, particularly those in immigrant families, have lower rates of participation in many government support programs when compared with other racial/ ethnic minority groups.e-g High-quality, research-based information on the characteristics, experiences, and diversity of Hispanic children and families is needed to inform programs and policies supporting the sizable population of low-income Hispanic families and children.

Opioid Prescribing: Where you live matters

Source: Opioid Prescribing: Where you live matters

Download Opioid Factsheet

The amount of opioids prescribed in the US peaked in 2010 and then decreased each year through 2015. However, prescribing remains high and vary widely from county to county. Healthcare providers began using opioids in the late 1990s to treat chronic pain (not related to cancer), such as arthritis and back pain. As this continued, more opioid prescriptions were written, for more days per prescription, in higher doses. Taking opioids for longer periods of time or in higher doses increases the risk of addiction, overdose, and death. In 2015, six times more opioids per resident were dispensed in the highest-prescribing counties than in the lowest-prescribing counties. County-level characteristics, such as rural versus urban, income level, and demographics, only explained about a third of the differences. This suggests that people receive different care depending on where they live.  Healthcare providers have an important role in offering safer and more effective pain treatment.

Healthcare providers can:

  • Follow the CDC Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain, which includes recommendations such as:
    • Use opioids only when benefits are likely to outweigh risks.
    • Start with the lowest effective dose of immediate-release opioids.  For acute pain, prescribe only the number of days that the pain is expected to be severe enough to require opioids.
    • Reassess benefits and risks if considering dose increases.
  • Use state-based prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs) which help identify patients at risk of addiction or overdose.

Celebrate the ADA: Toolkit for 2017 Themes

Source: Project of the ADA National Network/

Celebrate the ADA

Throughout the year, celebrate the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the ADA Anniversary (July 26) in your workplaces, schools and communities. While much progress has been made, much remains to be done.

This Tool Kit is a project of the ADA National Network and its ten regional ADA Centers across the United States that provide information, guidance and training on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

Themes for June 2017

Olmstead Decision – 18th Anniversary (6/22)

Countdown to ADA Anniversary

Explore & Learn the ADA

Sharing ADA Stories

Recreation, Play & Travel

Voting Access

Questions on the ADA?

The ADA National Network and its ten regional ADA Centers located throughout the United States are your comprehensive “one-stop” resource for information, guidance and training on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

Contact your ADA Center in the ADA National Network at 1-800-949-4232.

Counties at Risk of Having No Insurer on the Marketplace (Exchange) in 2018

This map shows the counties at risk of having no insurer on the marketplace (exchange), created by the Affordable Care Act, in 2018, based on a Kaiser Family Foundation analysis of insurer rate filings and news reports

Source: Counties at Risk of Having No Insurer on the Marketplace (Exchange) in 2018 | The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation

Our historical analysis of insurer participation on the marketplaces from 2014-2017 can be found here.

These data are preliminary and subject to change as more information becomes public. Insurer participation in 2018 will not be finalized until the fall of 2017. It is possible that another insurer will expand into the counties that currently appear bare, and it is also possible that insurers will exit from other counties not shown on this map.

If a county has no exchange insurer, consumers would not be able to purchase marketplace plans with federal subsidies, including advanced premium tax credits (APTCs) and cost-sharing reductions (CSR). Tax credits make coverage more affordable throughout the year by lowering consumers’ monthly premium costs; cost-sharing reductions help lower out-of-pocket costs. In 2017, 8.7 million people (84% of all marketplace enrollees) received tax credits to cover a share of their premium and 5.9 million people (57% of all marketplace enrollees) received cost-sharing reductions.

This map only shows participation by on-exchange insurers. It is possible that some people in counties with no exchange insurers in 2018 will be able to purchase individual plans off-exchange, though this coverage would not qualify for financial assistance. If no exchange insurer participates in their county, people that rely on these subsidies may be unable to afford insurance off-exchange.

FDA announced its intention to extend the compliance date for the Nutrition Facts Label final rules

FDA announced its intention to extend the compliance date for the Nutrition Facts Label final rules

Source: Labeling & Nutrition > Changes to the Nutrition Facts Label

Original vs. New Format – Infographics to Help Understand the Changes (New Food Label Side by Side Comparacion Paralela)

Compliance Date

On June 13, 2017, the FDA announced its intention to extend the compliance date for the Nutrition Facts Label final rules. The FDA will provide details of the extension through a Federal Register Notice at a later time.

In May 2016, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration finalized the Nutrition Facts and Supplement Facts Label and Serving Size final rules and set the compliance date for July 26, 2018, with an additional year to comply for manufacturers with annual food sales of less than $10 million. After those rules were finalized, industry and consumer groups provided the FDA with feedback regarding the compliance dates.

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