Responsive Practice Providing Health Care & Screenings to Individuals with Disabilities

The Responsive Practice training is online, on-demand, free for a limited time, and eligible for continuing education & continuing medical education credits. Responsive Practice enhances health care providers’ ability to deliver culturally competent, accessible care to people with intellectual, mobility, and other disabilities. Learning objectives:

  • Describe disparities in health experienced by people with disabilities compared to people without disabilities;
  • Recognize barriers to accessing health care & preventive services; and
  • Acquire strategies & approaches to provide disability-competent,responsive care.

Nurses

Southern NH AHEC is an Approved Provider of continuing nursing education by the Northeast Multistate Division (NE-MSD), an accredited approver of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

Physicians

Southern NH AHEC, accredited by the NH Medical Society, designates this live activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s). Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

1.0 contact hours. Activity Number: 1226

Responsive Practice Training Flyer 2018

Inclusive Innovation in Parks and Recreation – News & Media | Health.gov

Inclusive Innovation in Parks and Recreation

Source: Inclusive Innovation in Parks and Recreation – News & Media | Health.gov

By Allison Tubbs, Project Coordinator, National Center on Health, Physical Activity and DisabilityExternal Link: You are leaving health.gov and Maureen Acquino, Program Specialist, National Recreation and Park AssociationExternal Link: You are leaving health.gov

Park and recreation agencies are leading the way to inclusive communities across the country. Since the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) began in 1990, park and recreation agencies across the United States have made their facilities accessible and inclusive to those with disabilities. Although parks and public spaces are mandated to meet ADA requirements, there is much more that can be done to foster inclusion in all park and recreation programing, initiatives, and health and wellness efforts. To address this issue, the National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA) joined forces with the National Center on Health, Physical Activity and Disability and Lakeshore Foundation to launch Parks for InclusionExternal Link: You are leaving health.gov. Parks for Inclusion is NRPA’s formal pledge to the Commit to Inclusion’s Partnership for Inclusive HealthExternal Link: You are leaving health.gov. The pledge ensures that all people have equal access to the benefits of local parks and recreation. Parks for Inclusion supports built environment enhancements, model policy development, and best practices for program implementation to increase access to health opportunities for the following populations:

  • Those with physical and cognitive disabilities
  • The LGBTQ community
  • Racial and ethnic minorities and new Americans

“NRPA defines inclusion as removing barriers, both physical and theoretical, so that all people have an equal opportunity to enjoy the benefits of parks and recreation.”

Inclusion Report

To provide greater insight into how park and recreation agencies ensure that all members of their communities can enjoy parks and recreation, NRPA developed a needs assessment survey and Inclusion Report. Of the key findings, it was noted that two in five park and recreation agencies have a formal policy that ensures they are inclusive. The report identified some of the greatest challenges agencies face in being more inclusive – funding, staffing, facility space, and staff training. Follow this link to read the full reportExternal Link: You are leaving health.gov and view more findings at the infographic below.

Making an Impact

To kickstart opportunities, a microgrant programExternal Link: You are leaving health.gov was designed to award four local park and recreation agencies with small-seed funds to implement innovative programs and enhancements so individuals with a disability could participate in healthy living opportunities. In Minneapolis, the project “Sense TentsExternal Link: You are leaving health.gov” was implemented at local community event. This project provided a space with sensory friendly objects and activities for event participants with autism or other sensory disorders. Moving forward, the Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board will have these tents available at various outdoor events and provide information on how each sensory item is meant to be used and its benefits. Other projects included a Learn to Ride Adaptive Bike program at the McBeth Recreation Center in Austin, Texas, an intergenerational community garden project at Shirley M. Shark Historic Park in Prichard, Alabama, and an inclusive Grow Up Green Club for preschool-age children to explore nature in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Take Action towards Inclusion

Use the Parks for Inclusion resourcesExternal Link: You are leaving health.gov to take action towards inclusion.

 

Spread the Word! Share this post with your network using one of these sample tweets:

  • @NRPA and @NCHPAD discuss inclusive innovation in parks and recreation through #ParksforInclusion. Read more on the BAYW blog http://bit.ly/2IpvbQXExternal Link: You are leaving health.gov.
  • Spread the message that parks are for everyone! Get ideas, resources and success stories on the BAYW blog http://bit.ly/2IpvbQXExternal Link: You are leaving health.gov. #ParksforInclusion

 

Disclaimer: The opinions, findings and conclusions expressed by authors of this blog post are strictly their own and do not necessarily represent the opinion, views or policies of the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health (OASH), the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP) and the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).

New Hampshire Adults with Disabilities Are Motivated to Quit Smoking

The New Hampshire (NH) Disability & Public Health Project created a new data brief entitled, “New Hampshire Adults with Disabilities Are Motivated to Quit Smoking”.   To better understand smoking trends and attempts to quit among people with disabilities in NH, the NH Disability and Public Health Project (DPH) worked with the NH Tobacco Prevention and Cessation Program to add new questions to the QuitNow-NH intake survey.

Download PDF

Loneliness in people with intellectual and developmental disorders across the lifespan: A systematic review of prevalence and interventions – Alexandra – 2018 – JARID

The aim of the study was to conduct the first systematic review investigating the prevalence of loneliness in people with intellectual developmental disabilities (IDD) and the interventions targeting loneliness.

Source: Loneliness in people with intellectual and developmental disorders across the lifespan: A systematic review of prevalence and interventions – Alexandra – 2018 – Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities – Wiley Online Library

Abstract

Background

The aim of the study was to conduct the first systematic review investigating the prevalence of loneliness in people with intellectual developmental disabilities (IDD) and the interventions targeting loneliness.

Method

A search across five databases was conducted (May 2016–June 2016). One reviewer (A. P.) selected the articles for inclusion and assessed their risk of bias using a standardized tool. The second reviewer (A. H.) examined the list of included/excluded articles and the ratings of the studies.

Results

Five prevalence studies met the inclusion criteria and provided an average loneliness prevalence of 44.74%. Only one intervention study was included, and it demonstrated that there was not any significant group difference for loneliness outcomes (= .21). The majority of the studies had a weak quality rating.

Conclusion

The systematic review evidenced that loneliness is a common experience in people with IDD and there is a need to extend current research.

 

Embedding routine health checks for adults with intellectual disabilities in primary care: practice nurse perceptions – Macdonald – 2018 – JIDR

Qualitative study in General Practices located in NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde, Scotland, UK.MethodEleven practice nurses from 11 intervention practices participated in a semi-structured interview. Analysis was guided by a framework approach.

Source: Embedding routine health checks for adults with intellectual disabilities in primary care: practice nurse perceptions – Macdonald – 2018 – Journal of Intellectual Disability Research – Wiley Online Library

Abstract

Background

Adults with intellectual disabilities (IDs) have consistently poorer health outcomes than the general population. There is evidence that routine health checks in primary care may improve outcomes. We conducted a randomised controlled trial of practice nurse led health checks. Here, we report findings from the nested qualitative study.

Aim

To explore practice nurse perceptions and experience of delivering an anticipatory health check for adults with IDs.

Design and Setting

Qualitative study in General Practices located in NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde, Scotland, UK.

Method

Eleven practice nurses from 11 intervention practices participated in a semi-structured interview. Analysis was guided by a framework approach.

Results

Practice nurses reported initially feeling ‘swamped’ and ‘baffled’ by the prospect of the intervention, but early misgivings were not realised. Health checks were incorporated into daily routines with relative ease, but this was largely contingent on existing patient engagement. The intervention was thought most successful with patients already well known to the practice. Chronic disease management models are commonly used by practice nurses and participants tailored health checks to existing practice. It emerged that few of the nurses utilised the breadth of the check instead modifying the check to respond to individual patients’ needs. As such, already recognised ‘problems’ or issues dominated the health check process. Engaging with the health checks in this way appeared to increase the acceptability and feasibility of the check for nurses. There was universal support for the health check ethos, although some questioned whether all adults with IDs would access the health checks, and as a consequence, the long-term benefits of checks.

Conclusion

While the trial found the intervention to be dominant over standard health care, the adjustments nurses made may not have maximised potential benefits to patients. Increasing training could further improve the benefits that health checks provide for people with IDs.

2016 Disability Status Report

Disability Statistics
2016 Disability Status Report
http://bit.ly/2GfvPhN
This annual report from Cornell University provides a summary of the most recent demographic and economic statistics on the non-institutionalized population with disabilities. The report includes information about the population size and disability prevalence for various demographic subpopulations. Statistics related to employment, earnings, household income, veterans’ service-connected disability and health insurance are also included.

Download 2016-Disability_Status_Report_US

PCPID Releases Report on Direct Support Workforce | Administration for Community Living

February 14, 2018 The President’s Committee for People with Intellectual Disabilities (PCPID) has released its 2017 report, America’s Direct Support Workforce Crisis: Effects on People with Intellectual Disabilities, Families, Communities and the U.S. Economy.

Source: PCPID Releases Report on Direct Support Workforce | ACL Administration for Community Living

Direct support professionals (DSPs) provide services and supports that empower people with intellectual disabilities to live in the community.

In the report, PCPID notes that DSPs promote participation in the U.S. economy “by helping people with an (intellectual disability) get jobs and by enabling family members to work.”  The report describes the current state of the DSP workforce as a “crisis,” noting that the average DSP wage is $10.72, most work two or three jobs, and the average annual DSP turnover rate is 45%.

The report also explores:

  • How these issues affect individuals, families, and human services systems.
  • The factors that contribute to these issues
  • Promising practices to strengthen the direct support workforce

PCPID serves in an advisory capacity to the President of the United States and the Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS) promoting policies and initiatives that support independence and lifelong inclusion of people with intellectual disabilities in their respective communities. The committee includes representatives from several federal agencies and 13 citizen members.

Read the full report (PDF) or a plain-language version (PDF).

Broad PCORI Funding Announcements – Cycle 1 2018 (for Addressing Disparities, Assessment of Options, Communication and Dissemination Research, Improving Healthcare Systems) | PCORI

Source: Broad PCORI Funding Announcements – Cycle 1 2018 (for Addressing Disparities, Assessment of Options, Communication and Dissemination Research, Improving Healthcare Systems) | PCORI

Letters of Intent are due Tuesday, February 13, 2018, by 5:00 p.m. ET.
Those selected to submit a full application will be notified by Wednesday, March 14, 2018.
Full applications are due Wednesday, May 16, 2018, by 5:00 p.m. ET.

The Broad PCORI Funding Announcements (PFAs) seek investigator-initiated applications for patient-centered comparative clinical effectiveness research (CER) projects aligned with our priority areas for research. This PFA covers the following four priority areas: Addressing Disparities; Assessment of Prevention, Diagnosis, and Treatment Options; Assessment of Prevention, Diagnosis, and Treatment Options; Communication and Dissemination Research; and Improving Healthcare Systems. We are looking for your best ideas to address needs of patients, caregivers, clinicians, and other healthcare stakeholders in making personalized clinical decisions across a wide range of conditions, populations, and treatments.

These broad areas encompass the patient-centered comparative clinical effectiveness research we support. As our work progresses and we engage with a broad range of patients, caregivers, clinicians, and other healthcare stakeholders, we may develop additional national priorities for research.

Our National Priorities for Research and Research Agenda is a framework to guide our funding of comparative clinical effectiveness research that will give patients and those who care for them the ability to make better-informed health decisions. The framework was developed by workgroups of our Board of Governors, members of our Methodology Committee, and staff. It was revised in response to public comments and accepted by the Board on May 21, 2012.

Deborah Munroe Noonan Memorial Research Fund – Health Resource in Action

Source: Deborah Munroe Noonan Memorial Research Fund – Health Resource in Action

The Deborah Munroe Noonan Memorial Research Fund, established in 1947 by Frank M. Noonan in memory of his mother, continues its proud tradition of supporting improvements in the quality of life for children with disabilities with one-year grants up to $80,000 (inclusive of 20% indirect costs). Recognizing that children’s health services and supports are provided in a wide range of community settings as well as hospitals, the Noonan Research program welcomes research proposals from both nonprofit organizations and academic institutions that serve children with physical or developmental disabilities and associated health-related complications. Eligible organizations and target populations must be within the Fund’s geographic area of interest of Greater Boston. Neither a faculty position nor an advanced degree is required.

The Sara Elizabeth O’Brien Trust, Bank of America, N.A., Trustee, will support up to one additional project submitted to the Noonan Research Fund focusing on medical research related to blindness in children and adolescents.  Please note, the O’Brien Trust does not fund work on other visual impairments, e.g., strabismus. The O’Brien Trust is not restricted to the Noonan geography specified by the Noonan Research program.

Proposals for basic science research will not be considered (except for proposals focused on blindness funded by the O’Brien Trust), nor will applications for capital costs such as buildings, renovations, or major equipment items. The Noonan Fund does not support direct service, primary prevention projects, or primary medical conditions such as obesity or device development. Drug trials are not supported by the Noonan Research Fund.