Resubmissions Revisited: Funded Resubmission Applications and Their Initial Peer Review Scores

“My first submission got an overall impact score of 30. Is that good enough? What’s the likelihood I’ll eventually get this funded?”, or, “My first submission was not even discussed. Now what? Does anyone with an undiscussed grant bother to resubmit? And what’s the likelihood I’ll eventually get this funded?” In a past blog we provided some general advice and data to help you consider these types of questions, and obviously the answers depend on specifics — but even so, based on your feedback and comments

Source: Resubmissions Revisited: Funded Resubmission Applications and Their Initial Peer Review Scores | NIH Extramural Nexus

In a past blog we provided some general advice and data to help you consider these types of questions, and obviously the answers depend on specifics — but even so, based on your feedback and comments we thought it would be informative to offer high-level descriptive data on resubmission and award rates according to the first-time score, that is, the overall impact score on the A0 submission.

Here we describe the outcomes of 83,722 unsolicited A0 R01 applications submitted in fiscal years 2012 through 2016. Of these, 69,714 (or 83%) were “Type 1” (de novo) applications, while 14,008 (or 17%) were “Type 2” (or competing renewal) applications.

Let’s begin with looking at award rates: as a reminder, award rates are the total number of awards divided by the total number of applications. Figure 1 shows the award rate of these A0 applications broken out by type 1 (de novo) vs type 2 (competing renewals). (If you’re interested in looking at new and competing renewals in aggregate, for this and the following figures, these are shown in the Excel file we’ve posted to the RePORT website.)

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Expo Conference Materials

2016 KT Conference

This section of the Expo features archived presentations and files from the 2016 KT Conference. These include captioned YouTube videos, edited transcripts, and downloadable copies of presentation files (PDF and text versions). This Conference Archive is pre-approved for 10 hours CRC-CEUs through 12-11-17. You must complete an evaluation to receive your verification of completion form.

Source: Expo Conference Materials

Supporting Student Success through Connecting Activities: An Info Brief Series for Community Colleges | NCWD/Youth

Source: Supporting Student Success through Connecting Activities: An Info Brief Series for Community Colleges | NCWD/Youth

Community college leaders are increasingly concerned with finding ways to better support and engage students in an effort to improve college completion rates. In order to increase their persistence and completion, many students need assistance connecting to services, activities, programs, and supports relevant to their individual needs and goals. Postsecondary institutions can play a significant role in helping students access these services, supports, and opportunities. This series of Info Briefs is designed for community colleges to raise awareness about the significance of connecting students to services and supports such as health insurance, financial assistance, housing, and transportation, and assisting them in navigating these and other services and supports relevant to their individual needs and goals. In addition, these briefs provide practical examples of how some colleges are supporting students and relevant resources for implementing connecting activities at community colleges.

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Developing Financial Capability Among Youth: How Families Can Help | NCWD/Youth

Developing financial capability is an important part of preparing for the transition to adulthood. Financial capability is “the capacity, based on knowledge, skills, and access, to manage financial resources effectively” (Department of the Treasury, 2010). In other words, it is the ability to make wise decisions about using and managing money. Families have an important role to play in young people’s development of financial capability. Financial knowledge and habits developed in the teen and young adult years can have a lasting impact on their future.This brief for families provides suggestions and resources on how to talk with youth about money and assist them to learn and practice financial management skills through their interactions at home.

Source: Developing Financial Capability Among Youth: How Families Can Help | NCWD/Youth

La Familia: Latino Families Strong and Stable, Despite Limited Resources | Hispanic Center

The National Research Center on Hispanic Children & Families has just released a new brief series, “La Familia: Latino Families Strong and Stable, Despite Limited Resources.” The three briefs—including the first demographic portrait of Latino fathers—take a peek into Latino family life to examine how mothers, fathers, and boys are faring.These new studies come at a time when public discourse sometimes portrays Latinos in an unflattering light—yet this new research finds that Latino families are resilient and stable, despite many having low levels of income and education. This is true for Latinos in general, but especially for Latino immigrant families.

Source: La Familia: Latino Families Strong and Stable, Despite Limited Resources | Hispanic Center

Translational Research to Help Older Adults Maintain Their Health and Independence in the Community (R21)

This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites applications using the R21 award mechanism for translational research that moves evidence-based research findings toward the development of new interventions, programs,policies, practices, and tools that can be used by organizations in the community to help older adults remain healthy and independent, productively engaged, and living in their own homes and communities. The goal of this FOA is to support translational research involving collaborations between academic research centers and community-based organizations with expertise serving or engaging older adults (such as city and state health departments, city/town leadership councils, educational institutions, workplaces, Area Agencies on Aging, and organizations funded or assisted by the Corporation for National and Community Service) that will enhance our understanding of practical tools, techniques, programs and policies that communities across the nation can use to more effectively respond to needs of the aging population.
Standard Dates – Expiration Date May 8, 2017
Direct costs are limited to $275,000 over an R21 two-year period, with no more than $200,000 in direct costs allowed in any single year.

Policies for Action: Policy and Law Research to Build a Culture of Health

2017 Call for Proposals

Purpose

Policies for Action: Policy and Law Research to Build a Culture of Health (P4A) was created to help build the evidence base for policies that can help build a Culture of Health. P4A seeks to engage long-standing health care, mental and behavioral health, and public health researchers, as well as experts in areas that we recognize have strong influence on health, well-being and equity—such as labor, criminal justice, education, transportation, housing, and the built environment.The research funded under this call for proposals (CFP) should help fill significant gaps in our knowledge about what policies can serve as positive drivers of change, including how the social determinants of health can be used to achieve improvements in population health, well-being, and equity. Additional information on this program can be found at policiesforaction.org.

Key Dates

February 15, 2017 (1 p.m. ET)
Optional applicant Web conference call. Registration is requiredMarch 10, 2017 (3 p.m. ET)
Deadline for receipt of brief proposals.Early May 2017
Notification to brief proposal applicants, including invitations to submit full proposals.

June 16, 2017 (3 p.m. ET)
Deadline for receipt of invited full proposals.

Early to mid-August 2017
Notification to full proposal applicants, including invitations to finalists to proceed with grant initiations.

October 1, 2017
Grants initiated.

Community Partnerships to Advance Research (CPAR) (R15)

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-14-140.html

https://www.nichd.nih.gov/grants-funding/opportunities-mechanisms/mechanisms-types/comparison-mechanisms/Pages/default.aspx

Current Closing Date for Applications: May 07, 2017

Applicants may request up to $300,000 in direct costs plus applicable Facilities & Administrative (F&A)/indirect costs for the entire project period of up to 3 years.

This funding opportunity announcement addresses the need for researchers to partner with communities using Community Engaged Research (CEnR) methodologies that will enhance relationships leading to better interventions and positive health outcomes. Partnership is defined as an association of two or more persons or entities that conduct a study as equal co-investigators. Community Engagement (CE) lies on a continuum that reflects the level of involvement of community members, or representatives of community populations, in research. This continuum of involvement in research efforts ranges from community consent to research, to full participation and shared leadership of community members in research design and eventual dissemination and implementation.  Advances in translating research findings into practice have been made; however, such advances have not been realized by all members of society according to age, race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic group. Narrowing the gap in translational research within the NINR strategic areas of emphasis is a priority for the Institute. Using CE approaches and addressing areas such as self and symptom management, health promotion and prevention is one way to narrow the gap. CE can take many forms, and partners can include community based groups, agencies such as the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) innovation centers, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) prevention Research Centers, Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) Community Health Centers (CHC) and Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHC), other academic health institutions, or individuals. Collaborators may be engaged in health promotion/prevention, clinical or intervention research.

Community Partnerships to Advance Research (CPAR) (R01)

http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/search-grants.html?keywords=PA-14-142
https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-14-142.html

Current Closing Date for Applications: May 07, 2017

Requests of $500,000 or more for direct costs in any year

This funding opportunity announcement addresses the need for researchers to partner with communities using Community Engaged Research (CEnR) methodologies that will enhance relationships leading to better interventions and positive health outcomes. Partnership is defined as an association of two or more persons or entities that conduct a study as equal co-investigators. Community Engagement (CE) lies on a continuum that reflects the level of involvement of community members, or representatives of community populations, in research. This continuum of involvement in research efforts ranges from community consent to research, to full participation and shared leadership of community members in research design and eventual dissemination and implementation.  Advances in translating research findings into practice have been made; however, such advances have not been realized by all members of society according to age, race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic group. Narrowing the gap in translational research within the NINR strategic areas of emphasis is a priority for the Institute. Using CE approaches and addressing areas such as self and symptom management, health promotion and prevention is one way to narrow the gap. CE can take many forms, and partners can include community based groups, agencies such as the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) innovation centers, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) prevention Research Centers, Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) Community Health Centers (CHC) and Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHC), other academic health institutions, or individuals. Collaborators may be engaged in health promotion/prevention, clinical or intervention research.