Medicaid Work Requirements – Legally Suspect

DOWNLOAD PUBLICATION

Source: Medicaid Work Requirements – Legally Suspect

Executive Summary

Legal Director Jane Perkins, and Policy Analyst Ian McDonald detail why adding a work requirement to Medicaid is “legally suspect.” They explain that currently the Medicaid Act has four requirements that an individual must meet that do not include a mandatory work requirement. “A number of courts,” Perkins and McDonald write, “have recognized that states may not ‘add additional requirements for Medicaid eligibility’ that are not set forth in the Medicaid Act.” They also note that the purpose of Medicaid is to “furnish medical assistance to low-income individuals who cannot afford the costs of medically necessary services and to furnish ‘rehabilitation and other services to help [such individuals] attain or retain capability for independence or self-care. A mandatory work requirement is not medical assistance; it is not a service provided to Medicaid beneficiaries.”

Medicaid Work Requirements – Not a Healthy Choice

Executive SummaryIn an effort to win conservative members’ support for the Affordable Care Care Act repeal bill, House Republicans have added a work requirement for Medicaid to the measure. In this issue brief, NHeLP Managing Attorney of the DC office Mara Youdelman,  Legal Director Jane Perkins, and Policy Analyst Ian McDonald detail why such work requirements “run counter to the purpose of Medicaid.” They conclude, “Work requirements would stand Medicaid’s purpose on its head by creating barriers to coverage and the pathway to health that the coverage represents.”DOWNLOAD PUBLICATION

Source: Medicaid Work Requirements – Not a Healthy Choice

Grants | Refugee Health Promotion

Source: Grants | Administration for Children and Families

Summary

Funding Oppportunity Title: Refugee Health Promotion
Funding Opportunity Number: HHS-2017-ACF-ORR-RX-1222
Program Office: Office of Refugee Resettlement
Funding Type: Discretionary
Funding Instrument Type: Grant
Announcement Type: Initial
CFDA: 93.576
Post Date: 03/14/2017
Application Due Date: 05/15/2017

Description

The Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR) within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) invites States to submit applications for Refugee Health Promotion (RHP) discretionary grant funds.  The purpose of the RHP grant is to support health and emotional wellness among refugees.  The program is designed to coordinate and promote local health and mental health services and education.  The funding should enhance access to health care services.  The RHP grant is intended to encourage partnerships with community-based organizations and complement existing care coordination and medical assistance programs such as Medicaid and Refugee Medical Assistance (RMA), which includes Refugee Medical Screening (RMS), and other ORR-funded social service programs, including Preferred Communities.

Top 10 Changes to Medicaid Under House Republicans’ ACA Repeal Bill

Source: Top 10 Changes to Medicaid Under House Republicans’ ACA Repeal Bill

Executive Summary

Following the CBO score that found the House Republicans’ so-called “American Health Care Act” would cause 24 million people to lose health care coverage, NHeLP managing attorneys examine the bill’s “draconian changes” planned for Medicaid. Managing Attorney of the DC Office Mara Youdelman and Managing Attorney of the LA office Kim Lewis conclude that cutting $880 billion in federal funding and 14 million individuals off Medicaid “creates significant financial hardship for states and is devastating for low-income people everywhere. No one can afford these changes.”

With all Eyes on AHCA, House Advances 3 Bills that Could Reduce Benefits, Raise Costs for People in Employer-Based Coverage – Center on Health Insurance Reforms

With all Eyes on AHCA, House Advances 3 Bills that Could Reduce Benefits, Raise Costs for People in Employer-Based Coverage

Source: With all Eyes on AHCA, House Advances 3 Bills that Could Reduce Benefits, Raise Costs for People in Employer-Based Coverage – Center on Health Insurance Reforms

The week of March 6 was a busy one in the world of health care policy. On the Hill, legislation partially repealing the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and restructuring Medicaid was passed by two key House committees (H.R. the “American Health Care Act” or AHCA). At the Department of Health & Human Services, officials began reviewing almost 4,000 comments on the proposed ACA market stabilization rule that were received by the March 7th deadline.

Receiving far less attention was action in the House Education & Workforce Committee to advance three bills that could, if enacted, have far-reaching repercussions for people with employer-based health insurance.

Three bills that could undermine the security of employer-based coverage

Continue Reading

Compare Proposals to Replace The Affordable Care Act | The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation

President Donald Trump and Republicans in Congress have committed to repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act (ACA). How do their replacement proposals compare to the ACA? How do they compare to each other?Plans available for comparison:The American Health Care Act as introduced by the House Republican leadership, March 6, 2017 (PDF)The Affordable Care Act, 2010 (PDF)More plans for comparison:Rep. Tom Price’s Empowering Patients First Act, 2015 (PDF)House Speaker Paul Ryan’s A Better Way: Our Vision for a More Confident America, 2016 (PDF)Sen. Bill Cassidy’s Patient Freedom Act, 2017 (PDF)Sen. Rand Paul’s Obamacare Replacement Act, 2017 (PDF)House Discussion Draft, February 10, 2017 (PDF)Click the column header to view available plans to compare. You may compare up to 3 plans.

Source: Compare Proposals to Replace The Affordable Care Act | The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation

YOU MANY ALSO BE INTERESTED IN…

 

SUNspot – Wireless Device Ownership by People with Disabilities

Wireless Inclusive Technologies RERC

This SUNspot addresses the following question related to ownership of wireless devices by adults with disabilities:  Do people with disabilities own wireless devices (regular phones, smartphones and tablets) at the same rates as the general population?

Comparison of the results from the SUN and the Pew Research Center show that people with disabilities own cellphones at a high rate (83%), but still substantially lower than the general population (92%). Drilling down to examine the rates of ownership of specific types of mobile wireless devices shows that people with disabilities own smart devices (smartphones and tablets) at slightly higher rates than the general population. People with disabilities own basic cellphones at much lower rates than the general population.

Nurses’ experience of caring for people with intellectual disability and dementia

Josephine Cleary and Owen Doody

Aims and objectives. To explore nurses’ experiences of caring for older people with intellectual disability and dementia.

Background. Ageing and dementia prevalence is increasing along with the life expectancy of people with intellectual disability. As a population group, people with intellectual disability have a high prevalence of dementia, which is higher within the subpopulation of Down syndrome. People with intellectual disability live in residential care, community or residential settings, and nurses are required to adapt their practices to meet the changed needs of the individual.

Design. A qualitative Husserlian descriptive phenomenological methodology facilitated the researcher to become absorbed in the quintessence of meaning and explore nurses’ experience of working with older people with intellectual disability and dementia.

Methods. Ethical approval was obtained, and data were collected utilising semistructured interviews (n = 11). Interviews were transcribed and analysed using Colaizzi’s framework for data analysis.

Results. Three key themes were identified: ‘knowledge of dementia’, ‘personcentred care’ and ‘transitioning within the service’. The study highlights the need for proactive planning, life story books of the patient, and funding to support client and staff.

Conclusions. Overall, the study highlights the importance of knowing the person, supporting the individual and recognising presenting behaviours as outside the control of the individual. Relevance to clinical practice. This article presents the experiences of nurses caring for the older person with intellectual disability and dementia. Transitions are often very difficult for both the person and their peers, and they experience benefit from the efforts of a multidisciplinary team facilitating a person-centred approach.

The State of the Science of Health and Wellness for Adults With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Historically, people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) have experienced health disparities related to several factors including: a lack of access to high quality medical care, inadequate preparation of health care providers to meet their needs, the social determinants of health (e.g., poverty, race and gender), and the failure to include people with IDD in public health efforts and other prevention activities. Over the past decade, a greater effort has been made to both identify and begin to address myriad health disparities experienced by people with IDD through a variety of activities including programs that address health lifestyles and greater attention to the training of health care providers. Gaps in the literature include the lack of intervention trials, replications of successful approaches, and data that allow for better comparisons between people with IDD and without IDD living in the same communities. Implications for future research needed to reduce health disparities for people with IDD include: better monitoring and treatment for chronic conditions common in the general population that are also experienced by people with IDD, an enhanced understanding of how to promote health among those in the IDD population who are aging, addressing the health needs of people with IDD who are not part of the disability service system, developing a better understanding of how to include people with IDD in health and wellness programs, and improving methods for addressing the healthcare needs of members of this group in an efficient and cost-effective manner, either through better access to general medical care or specialized programs.

Source: The State of the Science of Health and Wellness for Adults With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities