YouthBuild: Goal Planning Tool

Goal Planning Tool Author(s): YouthBuild USA This goal planning tool was designed to engage staff across each program components and the young person in the goal planning and assessment process. This process should be introduced very early in the program year, ideally towards the end of mental toughness or shortly after the completion of mental toughness. It tracks the young person’s academic, career, and personal goals and aspirations while allowing both staff and young people to track assessment scores

Source: YouthBuild: Goal Planning Tool

Preparing for Life After High School: Characteristics and Experiences of Youth in Special Education

Findings from the National Longitudinal Transition Study 2012. Volume 1: Comparisons with Other Youth (Full Report)

Key Findings: Youth with an IEP are more likely than their peers to be socioeconomically disadvantaged and to face problems with health, communication, and completing typical tasks independently. The vast majority of youth with and without an IEP feel positive about school, but those with an IEP experience bullying and are suspended at higher rates, and are less engaged in school and social activities. Youth with an IEP are more likely than youth without an IEP to struggle academically, yet less likely to

Source: Preparing for Life After High School: The Characteristics and Experiences of Youth in Special Education. Findings from the National Longitudinal Transition Study 2012. Volume 1: Comparisons with Other Youth (Full Report)

Policymakers and educators have long recognized the importance of addressing the needs of youth in special education, who today account for 12 percent of all youth in the United States. Concern that this objective was not being adequately met led Congress to pass landmark legislation in 1975, now known as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) (U.S. Department of Education, 2010). IDEA mandates that children and youth with disabilities have access to a free appropriate public education.

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Data-Driven, Cross-Sector, and Community-Led Transformation: Place-based Population Health

Toward Data-Driven, Cross-Sector, and Community-Led Transformation: Academy Health provides an overview of the findings including the who, the what and the how.
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The Community Health Peer Learning Program (CHP), a partnership of AcademyHealth and the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC), conducted an environmental scan of multisector initiatives driving toward population health improvement at the community level, many with a focus on capturing, sharing, integrating, and using data to support their work. The scan and ensuing report confirm the emergence and rapid expansion of such efforts, and reflect a growing recognition that local conditions often drive the environmental and social determinants of health. Many place-based population health improvement efforts, therefore, involve sectors outside of health care (e.g., housing, education, criminal justice), and this report profiles several different programs and strategies designed to build and sustain these cross-sector collaborations. The report also conveys the scale, scope, and diversity of ongoing efforts, and offers insights into common challenges, emerging strategies, and promising practices to accelerate progress.Ultimately, the scan and associated report reveal the emergence of a movement—a convergence of programs and people connecting across traditional and non-traditional boundaries, and working together to improve community health.

Download the Executive Summary above, or click here for the full report.

Source: Toward Data-Driven, Cross-Sector, and Community-Led Transformation: Executive Summary | Academy Health

How to Bounce Back – Aging with a Disability Factsheet Series

Source: How to Bounce Back | Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Aging With Physical Disabilities

How to Bounce Back – Aging with a Disability Factsheet Series

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Living with a disability can be stressful at times. Resilience is a term that describes how we cope with stress. By building up our resilience, we can stay more engaged in life.

What Is Resilience?

Resilience describes our ability to bounce back and keep going after a stressful experience. Different people define resilience in different ways. When we asked people with disabilities to describe resilience in their own words, some descriptions included:

  • Bouncing back, or being “buoyant.”
  • “Rolling with” or “dancing with” a disability.
  • Taking things one day at a time, while also planning for the future.
  • Finding a “new normal” as life changes.
  • Making the best of life with a disability.
  • Trusting that stressful times will pass, like the weather.

DSP Crisis is Profound: New Report on the Impact of Quality Services for People with IDD

ANCOR Announces the Release of Its Workforce Paper

Source: ANCOR Announces the Release of Its Workforce Paper | ANCOR | American Network of Community Options and Resources

Community-based services to people with intellectual and developmental disabilities are facing one of the most major and growing workforce crises in the United States labor market.  Which is why, the American Network of Community Options and Resources (ANCOR) brought together national disability organizations and workforce experts last week to preview its new report entitled, Addressing the Disability Services Workforce Crisis of the 21st Century. Participants of ANCOR’s March 23rd Workforce Summit also discussed potential policy solutions moving forward.

ANCOR’s report compiles the latest data on the direct support professional (DSP) workforce, offers a historical overview of the workforce crisis, and offers solutions on how it can be addressed.

“For almost fifty years, ANCOR has represented providers of disability services in Washington, DC and watched the workforce crisis grow into a public health crisis,” said ANCOR CEO Barbara Merrill, “We are proud of the strides we have made in Congress and with previous Administrations, but this report marks the beginning of an even stronger movement to take measurable steps toward addressing the workforce crisis.”

ANCOR members and leaders of ANCOR’s National Advocacy Campaign, Daryn Demeritt and Chris Sparks, led ANCOR membership in ensuring the report was comprehensive and offered concrete solutions.

“The DSP crisis is profound and we see it in our daily operations across the country,” said Demeritt of ResCare based in Kentucky, “ANCOR’s report comes at a pivotal moment when we need to take action and cannot risk ignoring the impact it has on the quality of services provided to Americans with intellectual and developmental disabilities.“

“This is an instance where failure is not an option,” added Sparks of Exceptional Person, Inc. (EPI) in Iowa, “Millions of people with disabilities rely on DSPs so that they can access their communities, engage with their families and friends, and participate in the workforce themselves.  There are not enough DSPs to meet the need, and the waiting lists for these services are only growing. ANCOR’s report offers the solutions that need to be harnessed now to avoid decline of this successful program.”

Click here to read the Executive Summary of the ANCOR Workforce Report

Click here to access the full ANCOR Workforce Report

Click here to visit ANCOR’s Workforce Website

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The American Network of Community Options and Resources is a national trade association representing more than 1,200 private providers of community living and employment supports and services to more than 800,000 individuals with disabilities with a workforce that’s over half a million strong. ANCOR advocates for the crucial role private providers play in enhancing and supporting the lives of people with disabilities and their families.

Through its National Advocacy Campaign, ANCOR seeks to obtain the resources to recruit, train and retain a sustainable direct support workforce. ANCOR provides organization, professional, leadership development and networking opportunities and services and is continually working toward partnerships and collaborations that support our mission, which is to advance the ability of our members in supporting people with intellectual and developmental disabilities to fully participate in their communities.www.ancor.org

No Wrong Door No Wrong Door Systems (Aging and Disability Resource Centers)

No Wrong Door

Source: No Wrong Door

This paper provides concrete examples of how seven No Wrong Door Systems—sometimes called Aging and Disability Resource Centers—are promoting person- and family-centered practice. No Wrong Door Systems involve an array of organizations including Area Agencies on Aging, Centers for Independent Living, and state agencies such as Medicaid agencies and state units on aging. Older adults, people with disabilities, and their families can access services through these agencies in a variety of ways including in person, by telephone, and online.

Individualization is at the heart of person- and family-centered practice. It is an essential component of No Wrong Door Systems, allowing people to have information about their options and facilitate decision making based on individual and family preferences, values, and financial resources. The paper includes a toolkit of resources and contacts for states to learn more and even replicate these practices. A checklist—specifically created for this project—provides a roadmap for states to ensure that No Wrong Door Systems operate in a person- and family-centered way.

This paper is the first in a series of promising practices and emerging innovations reports. This series is a new feature of the upcoming, 3rd Long-Term Services and Supports (LTSS) Scorecard. The LTSS Scorecard—written by the AARP Public Policy Institute and funded by The SCAN Foundation and The Commonwealth Fund—measures state-level performance of LTSS systems that assist older people, adults with disabilities, and their family caregivers.

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County Health Rankings & Roadmaps

Source: County Health Rankings & Roadmaps

The annual Rankings provide a revealing snapshot of how health is influenced by where we live, learn, work and play. They provide a starting point for change in communities.
Choose a state from the map to begin.

The County Health Rankings & Roadmaps program helps communities identify and implement solutions that make it easier for people to be healthy in their neighborhoods, schools, and workplaces. Ranking the health of nearly every county in the nation, the County Health Rankings illustrate what we know when it comes to what is keeping people healthy or making people sick and how the opportunity for good health differs from one county to the next. Supporting a call to action, the Roadmaps show what we can do to create healthier places for everyone to live, learn, work, and play. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation collaborates with the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute to bring this program to communities across the nation.

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Knowledge Translation Case Book

Knowledge Translation Case Book

Source: KT Casebook

The Center on Knowledge Translation for Disability and Rehabilitation Research (KTDRR) has developed the Knowledge Translation (KT) Casebook to highlight what NIDILRR grantees are doing in the area of knowledge translation. Many grantees have indicated that they feel the development of a casebook of KT activities and accomplishments will help to:

  • Learn from each other’s experiences
  • Make connections with other grantees that may facilitate and expand our KT actions
  • Gain new ideas about KT strategies being used by other grantees
  • Identify KT examples that have focused on stakeholder or target audiences of interest
  • Expand awareness of the KT accomplishments being made by NIDILRR grantees

We will update these entries as appropriate and add more NIDILRR grantees’ KT stories to the KT Casebook annually. If your NIDILRR grant project would like to share your experience to be included in the next KT Casebook, please contact us today!

Waivers of Medicaid Requirements – A Quick Review

Executive Summary

In a companion piece to Background to Medicaid and Section 1115 of the Social Security Act, Legal Director Jane Perkins and Managing Attorney of the DC office Mara Youdelman provide a brief review of how certain Medicaid requirements may be waived. They conclude, in part, that “Section 1115 of the Social Security Act gives the Secretary of HHS limited authority to approve Medicaid waivers.”

Defending Medicaid

Medicaid’s guaranteed-enrollment for those who meet eligibility requirements makes the program vulnerable to attacks at both the federal and state levels.  NHeLP actively defends Medicaid against these threats, protects the rights of beneficiaries to receive the services to which to which they are legally entitled and works to ensure that states meet their obligations under the Medicaid Act.

NHeLP’s Protect Medicaid Webinar Series

Proposals to drastically cut federal Medicaid spending through per capita caps and block grants would fundamentally alter and undermine Medicaid. NHeLP’s Protect Medicaid webinar series examines the harmful impact of these proposals on key features of the Medicaid program, including: services and benefits geared for vulnerable populations; affordability and cost sharing protections; advances under the ACA’s low income adult expansion; and consumer protections and due process guarantees.

Click the links to watch the videos, which will appear in a new window.

Click to download PDFs:

 

Click on the links below to register for these upcoming webinars:
Friday, April 7
Noon-1 p.m. EDT – Section 1115 authority

Friday, April 28
2 p.m. EDT – Rulemaking, Agency Authority, and the Administrative Procedures Act – An Overview