18th Annual Chronic Illness and Disability Conference: Transition from Pediatric to Adult-based Care

AUCD is proud to support the online broadcast of Baylor College of Medicine’s 18th Annual Chronic Illness and Disability Conference.

Source: AUCD

Participate Remotely

All MCH Training Programs and UCEDDs are invited and encouraged to participate remotely by hosting a live stream of this conference for trainees, faculty, staff, families, and others at your center or program. Eligible broadcast sites include MCH training programs, UCEDDs, and Title V programs. This is an excellent opportunity for your trainees and staff to gain in-depth coverage of a range of transition issues at a very low cost of $150 per site.

An Engaging Agenda

Hosted by Baylor College of Medicine and available nationwide through an AUCD-sponsored live broadcast, this year’s conference is shaping up to be a valuable resource for the AUCD network and beyond. Register as a broadcast site in order to:

  • Listen to Toronto Children’s Hospital share about the role that social media and digital communications can play in engaging transition-aged youth
  • Participate in a breakout session on Supported Decision Making
  • Learn about one LEND alumni’s work toward educate others on healthy sexuality for people with I/DD
  • Earn CME and CNE Credits, Social Work CEUs, and PT and OT CCUs without leaving the office

… and much more!

Register

To register as a broadcast site, contact Baylor College of Medicine, Office of Continuing Medical Education, at 713-798-8237 or e-mail cme@bcm.edu for instructions. For registration questions, contact Baylor’s Cicely Simon. To speak with someone at AUCD about this event, contact Sarah DeMaio

Why We Participate

“Minnesota LEND partners with Gillette Lifetime Specialty Clinic in co-hosting the live broadcast of this conference …to learn about evidence-based practices in the critical need area of healthcare transition. Gillette staff members were very excited about this opportunity to ‘attend’ Baylor’s conference at their work place. We hope to increase this type of collaborative learning each year for our clinical partners and trainees.” 

– Rebecca Dosch-Brown, MN LEND Training Coordinator

Baylor does an excellent job of addressing the task of facilitating adolescent transition as youth learn to navigate health care, post-secondary work or school, and independent living. The mixture of national and local presenters who come from clinical, research, policy, advocacy, and patient perspectives provide a well-rounded presentation of the realities of transition. The annual conference jumps starts our trainees’ knowledge and skill development regarding transition. It allows us to introduce a wide array of issues that would take us much longer to do with our own content development. We are grateful that we are able to gain so much with a relatively small investment on our part.

– David Deere, Arkansas Regional LEND Training Director

“WI LEND program works with our state Youth Health Transition Hub to host at least 2 sites in Wisconsin – Madison and Milwaukee. LEND trainees participate as they are able, but are a small part of the audience. We have mostly providers (nurses, SW, MD, other health professionals), our MCH PPC partners and trainees, and just a few families, who come to the broadcast.”

-Anne Harris, WI LEND Director

Webcast: Disclosing Disability in the Workplace

Source: NIDILRR-funded Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Employment of People with Physical Disabilities (VCU-RRTC)

Webcast, Disclosing Disability in the Workplace

July 13th, 2-2:45pm ET. Registration is free and required.

This presentation will review the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments Act (ADAAA) pertaining to disclosure of disability in the workplace and examine the considerations that workers with disabilities must make in deciding whether to disclose.  Research findings from several recent studies of the disclosure decision will be presented.

Social Support Networks of Aging Persons with Intellectual Disabilities

Play Recording

Presented by: Lieke van Heumen, PhD

This webinar will discuss emerging research and practice in supporting social networks of adults aging with intellectual disabilities. After a brief introduction on aging in this population, the webinar will discuss the role of social relations in later life and address the state of knowledge regarding the social support networks of older adults with intellectual disabilities. The webinar will provide a discussion of the role of support services in promoting informal networks and conclude with an exploration of the use of social network mapping and life story work in person-centered planning.

Lieke van Heumen is a postdoctoral research fellow at the Department of Disability and Human Development, University of Illinois at Chicago. Lieke’s primary research interest is the intersection of aging and disability with a focus on supports that contribute to aging well. She believes retrieving the lived experiences of older adults with disabilities by means of inclusive and accessible research methods is key to assuring the meaningful engagement of adults with disabilities in the research process.

Transition of Young Adults with Developmental Disabilities to Adult-Systems of Care

2017/03/16
2pm – 3pm CST

REGISTER HERE

Presented by: Kruti Acharya, MD

Dr. Acharya will review the most recent data about health care transition for adolescents and young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). During the webinar, she will describe standard of care for health care transition and highlight strategies to support the transition to adult-centered health care for this population.

Dr. Acharya is a board certified developmental and behavioral pediatrician and internist at the University of Illinois at Chicago and the director of the Illinois Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental Disabilities (LEND) Program. Dr. Acharya cares for individuals with developmental disabilities using a lifespan perspective from childhood to adulthood. She is particularly interested in supporting adolescents and young adults with developmental disabilities as they transition to adult-systems of care and beyond.

Small Steps, Big Leaps: Healthy Vending in Your Organization

2017/04/06
2:00 to 3:00 pm CST

This presentation provides strategies for healthier vending options through the following: (i) steps to developing healthy vending machine initiative; (ii) using tools to survey vending machines and implementing new guidelines; and, (iii) integrating examples and links to resources related to healthy vending machine for your initiative.

Audience: Providers who provide Supports for Community Living services to people with IDD and others seeking to increase healthy options in their organization’s vending machines.

Presenters: Jasmina Sisirak, PhD, MPH and Kristin Krok, CTRS

Vending PowerPoint Presentation

Transcript “Small Steps BIG LEAPS” Presentation 4-6-17

View Presentation

Handouts

  1. Healthy Vending Guidelines
  2. Healthy Vending
  3. Vending Machine Inventory Tool
  4. Vending Policy Example

Citation: Sisirak, J. & Krok, K. (2017). Small Steps, Big Leaps: Healthy Vending in Your Organization. HealthMatters Community of Practice Webinar Series. RRTCDD: Chicago, IL.

Social Support Networks of Aging Persons with Intellectual Disabilities

2017/04/20
2pm – 3pm CST

REGISTER HERE

Presented by: Lieke van Heumen, PhD

This webinar will discuss emerging research and practice in supporting social networks of adults aging with intellectual disabilities. After a brief introduction on aging in this population, the webinar will discuss the role of social relations in later life and address the state of knowledge regarding the social support networks of older adults with intellectual disabilities. The webinar will provide a discussion of the role of support services in promoting informal networks and conclude with an exploration of the use of social network mapping and life story work in person-centered planning.

Lieke van Heumen is a postdoctoral research fellow at the Department of Disability and Human Development, University of Illinois at Chicago. Lieke’s primary research interest is the intersection of aging and disability with a focus on supports that contribute to aging well. She believes retrieving the lived experiences of older adults with disabilities by means of inclusive and accessible research methods is key to assuring the meaningful engagement of adults with disabilities in the research process.

Aging and Dementia Care for People with Intellectual Disabilities

 Thursday, February 16, 2017

3:00pm | Eastern Daylight Time

Presented by: Matthew Janicki, PhD

Many organizations are seeing the aging of their clientele and their numbers increase, and concerns are growing about how to deal with age-associated effects evidenced with aging. One such age-associated condition, Alzheimer’s disease (and related dementias), affects a significant number of adults with Down syndrome (about 65% of adults age more than 60) and a proportional number of adults with other causes of intellectual disability (about 6% of adults age more than 60). Many at-risk adults live on their own or with friends, and many affected adults live in small community group homes or with their families. How to provide sound and responsive community care is becoming a challenge for agencies faced with an increasing number of such affected adults. This webinar covers key elements of dementia and how it affects adults with intellectual disabilities, provides a brief overview of screening and assessment strategies and methods, and examines ways that organizations can employ to adapt their current services to make them dementia capable. Specifically covered are the elements and types of dementia, as well its onset, duration and effect, and techniques for adapting environments, aiding with staff interactions and communication, as well as challenges to active and supportive programming. Models for supports depending on the stage of dementia are also discussed, as are training foci areas and community care models that provide for “dementia capable” supports and services. Special attention is given to the use of group homes as a viable community care model.

Matthew P. Janicki, Ph.D. is the co-chair of the US National Task Group on Intellectual Disabilities and Dementia Practices, research associate professor in the Department of Disability and Human Development at the University of Illinois at Chicago and Director for Technical Assistance for the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Developmental Disabilities and Health (RRTCDD) at the University.

 Play recording (1 hr 4 min)

Webinar-4_Janicki