JAN Blog » Accommodations, Accessibility, and the ADA

Accommodations, Accessibility, and the ADA

Source: JAN Blog » Accommodations, Accessibility, and the ADA

By: Matthew McCord, Consultant – Motor Team

Back in 2014, Elisabeth Simpson wrote a Blog post on low cost accommodation solutions. Three years have passed since then, and I think it is time to revisit this subject and provide you all with some additional options to keep in your toolkit. However, this post will focus more on Do-It-Yourself style accommodations. So, if you are one to enjoy rolling up your sleeves and tackling accommodation needs directly rather than purchasing a product, then this Blog article is for you. Even if you aren’t a hands-on kind of person, some of these options may still be helpful.

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Physical Activity: Family-Based Interventions

Source: Physical Activity: Family-Based Interventions

Summary of Task Force Finding

The Community Preventive Services Task Force recommends family-based interventions to increase physical activity among children.

Intervention

Family-based interventions combine activities to build family support with health education to increase physical activity among children. Interventions include one or more of the following:

  • Goal-setting tools and skills to monitor progress, such as a website to enter information
  • Reinforcement of positive health behaviors, such as reward charts or role modeling of physical activity by parents or instructors
  • Organized physical activity sessions, such as instructor-led opportunities for active games

Interventions also may provide information about other lifestyle behaviors such as choosing healthier foods or reducing screen time.

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Task Force Finding and Rationale Statement

Read the full Task Force Finding and Rationale Statement pdf icon [PDF – 633 kB] for details including implementation issues, possible added benefits, potential harms, and evidence gaps.

Obesity: Meals and Snacks Provided by Schools | The Community Guide

Source: Obesity: Meals and Snacks Provided by Schools | The Community Guide

Summary of Task Force Finding

The Community Preventive Services Task Force recommends meal interventions and fruit and vegetable snack interventions to increase the availability of healthier foods and beverages provided by schools. This finding is based on evidence that they increase fruit and vegetable consumption and reduce or maintain the rate of obesity or overweight.

The Task Force has related findings for interventions to increase healthier foods and beverages in schools:

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Intervention

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Health Equity, Social Determinants | The Community Guide

Source: Health Equity, Social Determinants | The Community Guide

Health equity exists when individuals have equal opportunities to be healthy. The ability to be healthy is often associated with factors such as social position, race, ethnicity, gender, religion, sexual identity, or disability. When these factors limit a person’s ability to be healthy it can lead to health inequity.

Health inequities are caused by the uneven distribution of social determinants of health. Social determinants include education, housing, and the neighborhood environment (e.g., sidewalks, parks), access to transportation, employment opportunities, the law and the justice systems, and health care and public health systems. Social determinants of health affect a person’s ability to earn a good living, live and work in a safe and healthy environment, and effectively use available resources including health care resources. Sometimes populations that represent a specific demographic feature (e.g., a particular racial or ethnic group) do not have equal access to quality education, housing, and other resources which can lead to greater sickness, and increased injuries and deaths.

Current Community Guide reviews are focused on interventions to reduce health inequities among racial and ethnic minorities and low-income populations.

Fitness facilities still lack accessibility for people with disabilities

Fitness facilities have potential to serve as places of ‘health enhancement’ for many underserved populations, particularly among people with physical/mobility disabilities where walking outdoors to meet recommendations for regular physical activity is not an option due to mobility or safety issues.

Source: Fitness facilities still lack accessibility for people with disabilities – Disability and Health Journal

Abstract

Background

Fitness facilities have potential to serve as places of ‘health enhancement’ for many underserved populations, particularly among people with physical/mobility disabilities where walking outdoors to meet recommendations for regular physical activity is not an option due to mobility or safety issues.

Objective

To examine the accessibility and usability of fitness facilities across the U.S. from a broader framework of physical and program access.

Methods

A convenience sample of 227 fitness facilities in 10 states were assessed by trained evaluators using the Accessibility Instrument Measuring Fitness and Recreation Environments (AIMFREE) tool. Non-parametric tests were performed to determine whether AIMFREE section scores were different by geographic region (urban, suburban), business type (nonprofit, for-profit), facility affiliation (fitness center/health club, park district/community center, hospital/rehabilitation facility, university/college), and facility construction date (pre/post passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act, ADA). Raw scores were converted to scaled scores with higher scores indicating better accessibility based on a criterion-referenced approach.

Results

Section scale scores (11/13) were low (<70) with differences found across facility affiliation. While facilities built after passage of the ADA had higher accessibility scores compared to pre-ADA facilities, only programs and water fountains had scaled scores ≥70 regardless of facility construction date.

Conclusions

There exists a strong and urgent need to encourage owners and operators of fitness facilities to reach a higher level of accessibility. Until then, many people with physical/mobility disabilities will continue to have limited access to programs, equipment, and services offered at these facilities.

2016 Community Rankings for Healthy Eating – Gallup-Sharecare

Source: Gallup-Sharecare Well-Being Index

This report, part of the Gallup-Sharecare State of American Well-Being series, examines healthy eating across the nation, ranking 189 communities based on the question ‘Did you eat healthy all day yesterday?’ The rankings show a wide range of results – with the highest communities having more than three quarters of their citizens report eating healthy all day the previous day compared to just over half among the lowest healthy eating communities.

Gallup-Sharecare 2016 Community Rankings for Healthy Eating

In 2016, many of the top healthy eating communities are located in California, with ten California-based communities in the top 25. Florida has four communities in the top 25, and Texas and Arizona each claim two top spots. The highest healthy eating community in the country is Naples-Immokalee-Marco Island, FL, a community that also had the highest well-being in the country for the last two years. Barnstable Town, MA was number two in healthy eating, followed by Santa Cruz-Watsonville, CA, Salinas, CA, McAllen-Edinburg-Mission, TX, and Santa Rosa, CA – all of which had more than 72% of their citizens report healthy eating.

The lowest rates of healthy eating come from states such as Ohio, Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, and Louisiana – with each of these states having two communities in the lowest 25. Lubbock, TX, Memphis, TN, Cincinnati, OH, Hickory-Lenoir-Morganton, NC, Clarksville, KY, Lexington-Fayette, KY, and Wichita, KS each have less than 57% of their citizens eating healthy. Seven of the ten lowest healthy eating communities are also among the lowest communities for overall well-being.

Download the latest Well-Being Index reports

 

Daphne Ron: Good and Bad Experiences with Health Care

Watch Daphne Ron’s Presentation Good and Bad Experiences with Health Care

TRANSCRIPT: Daphne Ron Presentation Good and Bad Experiences with Health Care

Self advocate Daphne Ron discusses the good and bad experiences she has had with health care during the “Partnering to Transform Healthcare with People with Disabilities (PATH-PWD) – Improving Acute, Primary and Transitional Health care with People with Disabilities” conference March 23-24, 2017 at Rush University. This conference was a collaboration between Rush and the RRTC-DD and Health which was funded by AHRQ.

Racial Disparities in Age-Specific Mortality Among Blacks or African Americans — United States, 1999–2015 | MMWR

Racial Disparities in Age-Specific Mortality Among Blacks or African Americans — United States, 1999–2015

Source: Vital Signs: Racial Disparities in Age-Specific Mortality Among Blacks or African Americans — United States, 1999–2015 | MMWR

Abstract

Background: Although the overall life expectancy at birth has increased for both blacks and whites and the gap between these populations has narrowed, disparities in life expectancy and the leading causes of death for blacks compared with whites in the United States remain substantial. Understanding how factors that influence these disparities vary across the life span might enhance the targeting of appropriate interventions.

Methods: Trends during 1999–2015 in mortality rates for the leading causes of death were examined by black and white race and age group. Multiple 2014 and 2015 national data sources were analyzed to compare blacks with whites in selected age groups by sociodemographic characteristics, self-reported health behaviors, health-related quality of life indicators, use of health services, and chronic conditions.

Results: During 1999–2015, age-adjusted death rates decreased significantly in both populations, with rates declining more sharply among blacks for most leading causes of death. Thus, the disparity gap in all-cause mortality rates narrowed from 33% in 1999 to 16% in 2015. However, during 2015, blacks still had higher death rates than whites for all-cause mortality in all groups aged <65 years. Compared with whites, blacks in age groups <65 years had higher levels of some self-reported risk factors and chronic diseases and mortality from cardiovascular diseases and cancer, diseases that are most common among persons aged ≥65 years.

Conclusions and Implications for Public Health Practice: To continue to reduce the gap in health disparities, these findings suggest an ongoing need for universal and targeted interventions that address the leading causes of deaths among blacks (especially cardiovascular disease and cancer and their risk factors) across the life span and create equal opportunities for health.

Lessons from High Performing Hospitals: Achieving Patient and Family-Centered Care

Source: Lessons from High Performing Hospitals

Lessons from High Performing Hospitals: Achieving Patient and Family-Centered Care

Patient-Centered Care In A Nutshell

  • Providers partner with patients to anticipate and satisfy the full range of patient needs and preferences
  • Hospitals support staff in achieving their professional aspirations and personal goals

A Consistent Finding: It’s All About Culture

  • High performing sites credited their HCAHPS success not to specific practices, but to a well-established culture of patient-centered care
  • High performing sites had implemented a comprehensive approach to patient engagement, family involvement and staff engagement
  • Improvement Guide reflects this key finding, providing guidance for implementing practices within a broader framework of organizational culture change