Waiting for health equity: A graphic novel

About the Project

Today, we can accurately predict a Coloradan’s health outcomes and access to health care based on factors like their race, income, or ZIP code. This is unacceptable, because it means that people of color, Coloradans with less economic opportunity, those living in communities with fewer resources, and others, face increased barriers to good health simply due to their life circumstances. How did this happen?

Colorado—just like the rest of the US—has a long, well-documented history of oppressive policies and practices that have led to significant, persistent, and preventable health disparities, or differences in health outcomes across certain groups. In order to tackle these injustices, we must understand their root causes, such as institutional racism (the policies and practices within institutions that, intentionally or not, produce outcomes that negatively impact people of color) and poverty. Waiting for Health Equity is a graphic novel that aims to start new conversations about the complex challenges Colorado faces in working toward health equity.

Use these supplementary materials to structure your conversations:


For more information or to request a printed copy, please contact our Director of Communications, Sarah McAfee.

The Role of Families As Caregivers & Guides for Whole Health & Wellness

Health care providers often focus on serving either children or adults. While this focus may mean more tailored approaches to care for the individual patient, it may be a missed opportunity to address the role of family on health outcomes.

Source: Multi-Generational Approach to Care Overview 

Taking a multi-generational approach involves changing the focus of how the patient is viewed within the system. Health care providers may be serving a child, but must work with the family to address any issues. Often, caregivers or parents see their child’s pediatrician more than they see their own primary care provider. Therefore, they may feel more comfortable bringing up their own health concerns or accessing community supports in this setting.

Caring for the whole family requires a system of care coordination that can support an array of services, involving a variety of health care professionals. Integrated primary care and behavioral health settings help facilitate this approach to care and leverage the community resources needed to support the whole family.

 

ASAN Releases Plain-Language Medicaid Toolkit

A Self-Advocate’s Guide to Medicaid

Medicaid is the biggest health care program in the country. It’s an important part of the United States health care system. But a lot of the information out there about Medicaid and attempts to change it can be difficult to understand and navigate. That’s why ASAN is proud to announce the release of our plain language resource “A Self-Advocate’s Guide to Medicaid.” This resource was developed in collaboration with the Autism Services, Education, Resources and Training Collaborative (ASERT), and with funding from the Special Hope Foundation.

The Easy Read Edition is split into parts. Each part has its own glossary, and there is also a separate glossary with all of the terms from every section. Click on the title of any of the parts below to download it:

Factors associated with meeting physical activity guidelines by adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities

Adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities may face challenges to staying physically active. Rate for adults with IDD meeting PA guidelines (13.5%) was less than half that of the general population (30.8%).

Source: Factors associated with meeting physical activity guidelines by adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities

Abstract

Background

Many individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) have sedentary lifestyles.

Aims

(a) compare adults with IDD with the general adult population on adherence to U.S. physical activity (PA) guidelines, and (b) determine what factors predict adherence to PA guidelines by adults with IDD.

Methods

We compared adults with IDD from the 2011–2012 National Core Indicators Adult Consumer Survey (NCI-ACS) with the general U.S. population on meeting PA guidelines. We examined the association of demographic, diagnostic, mobility, health and community participation variables with meeting PA guidelines by adults with IDD.

Results

The rate for adults with IDD meeting PA guidelines (13.5%) was less than half that of the general population (30.8%). Among adults with IDD, at-risk groups included those with more severe disability, Down syndrome, mobility impairments, obesity, poor health, mental illness, no independent access to community exercise, and less frequent participation in community exercise. Going out for exercise was the only form of community participation associated with meeting PA guidelines. People who accessed the community for exercise independently (i.e., alone) were more likely to meet PA guidelines.

Conclusions

Interventions aimed at increasing PA for people with IDD should consider these factors in their design.

Plan Your Lifespan

Source: http://www.planyourlifespan.org

People are living longer. Are you prepared to turn 80, 90, or 100?

This website will help you plan for health events such as hospitalizations, falls, and memory loss that may happen as people get older. This planning differs from end of life care and wills.

Do you know…

  • What your rehabilitation options are after a hospitalization?
  • How to connect with local services and resources such as in-home care, Villages, and skilled nursing facilities?
  • What steps you can take to help prevent falls?

Plan Your Lifespan will help you learn valuable information and provide you with an easy-to-use tool that you can fill in with your plans, make updates as needed, and easily share it with family and friends.

The Impact of Health Reform Repeal on Employment

Use this interactive map to see the state-by-state impact of repeal of federal health reform on jobs.

Source: The Impact of Health Reform Repeal on Employment – The Commonwealth Fund

Contrary to a common misconception that health reform law has been a “job killer,” this study shows that repeal of these policies may cause major job losses and economic dislocation in every state -even in states that have not expanded their Medicaid programs.

While health reform repeal would dramatically increase the number of uninsured and harm access to health care, particularly for low- and moderate-income Americans, this analysis demonstrates that the consequences could be broader and extend well beyond the health care system. Repeal could trigger major reductions in employment and substantial losses in state economic activity and state and local revenues.

While health reform repeal would dramatically increase the number of uninsured and harm access to health care, particularly for low- and moderate-income Americans, this analysis demonstrates that the consequences could be broader and extend well beyond the health care system. Repeal could trigger major reductions in employment and substantial losses in state economic activity and state and local revenues.

Hover over states to see the impact of repeal of premium tax credits and Medicaid expansion on jobs.

Or click to download a state profile available under the map.

Impact of Health Reform Repeal-US Map
Impact of Health Reform Repeal-US Map

Obesity: Meal and Fruit and Vegetable Snack Interventions to Increase Healthier Foods and Beverages Provided by Schools

Source: Obesity: Meal and Fruit and Vegetable Snack Interventions to Increase Healthier Foods and Beverages Provided by Schools

Summary of Task Force Finding

The Community Preventive Services Task Force recommends meal interventions and fruit and vegetable snack interventions to increase the availability of healthier foods and beverages provided by schools. This finding is based on evidence that they increase fruit and vegetable consumption and reduce or maintain the rate of obesity or overweight.

The Task Force has related findings for interventions to increase healthier foods and beverages in schools:

Intervention

Meal interventions and fruit and vegetable snack interventions aim to provide healthier foods and beverages that are appealing to students, limit access to less healthy foods and beverages, or both.

Interventions must include one of the following components:

  • School meal policies that ensure school breakfasts or lunches meet specific nutrition requirements (e.g., School Breakfast Program, National School Lunch Program)
  • Fresh fruit and vegetable programs that provide fresh fruits and vegetables to students during lunch or snack
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Strong at the Broken Places

Decades of research have shown that children living in poverty are significantly more likely to develop internalizing and externalizing problems than are their peers who are not poor, with the magnitude of the differential increasing with longer exposure to impoverished conditions. Many of these children are labeled as “at risk” – of academic difficulties, school failure, suspension, expulsion, dropping out, and involvement with the juvenile justice system.

Source: NCCP | Strong at the Broken Places

Authors: Renée Wilson-Simmons, Yang Jiang, and Yumiko Aratani  (Publication Date: April 2017)

Social-emotional competence in children – the ability to manage emotions, express needs and feelings, deal with conflict, and get along with others – plays a critical role in their cognitive skill building, mental health, and overall well-being. In addition, social-emotional competence has proven to be an important protective factor, buffering children from stressors and aiding in the prevention of serious emotional and behavioral difficulties, such as internalizing and externalizing behaviors.

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6 Steps to Creating a Culture of Person and Family Engagement in Health Care

Source: 6 Steps to Creating a Culture of Person and Family Engagement in Health Care

This Planetree PFE Culture Change Toolkit is designed for health care practices participating in the Transforming Clinical Practice Initiative, but will be of value to any practice seeking strategies to improve person and family engagement. It provides guidance on creating a practice culture that emphasizes and incorporates the patient and family perspective in every aspect of care, to ultimately improve quality of care.

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National Physical Fitness & Sports Month – May 2017

It’s National Physical Fitness & Sports Month! The President’s Council on Fitness, Sports & Nutrition is excited to keep the journey from #0to60 going by encouraging everyone to #MoveInMay. This May, stay motivated with the President’s Council’s Presidential Champions and Presidential Active Lifestyle Award (PALA+) programs! Each program allows you to track your daily physical activity and earn awards. There are countless ways to get moving and we are asking our partners to help us inspire all Americans t

Source: National Physical Fitness & Sports Month – May 2017 | HHS.gov

It’s National Physical Fitness & Sports Month! The President’s Council on Fitness, Sports & Nutrition is excited to keep the journey from #0to60 going by encouraging everyone to #MoveInMay.

This May, stay motivated with the President’s Council’s Presidential Champions and Presidential Active Lifestyle Award (PALA+) programs! Each program allows you to track your daily physical activity and earn awards.

There are countless ways to get moving and we are asking our partners to help us inspire all Americans to be active. We’ve created this #MoveInMay Playbook where you can find themes, tips and motivational messages that you can promote throughout the month. You can also get ideas to #MoveInMay and every day at 0to60fitness.org !

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