Health, United States, 2016

Source: CDC.gov

Download Health, United States, 2016: Chartbook on Longterm Trends in Health

Health, United States, 2016 is the 40th report on the health status of the nation and is submitted by the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services to the President and the Congress of the United States in compliance with Section 308 of the Public Health Service Act. This report was compiled by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

The Health, United States series presents an annual overview of national trends in health statistics. The report contains a Chartbook that assesses the nation’s health by presenting trends and current information on selected measures of morbidity, mortality, health care utilization and access, health risk factors, prevention, health insurance, and personal health care expenditures. This year’s Chartbook focuses on long-term trends in health. The report also contains 114 Trend Tables organized around four major subject areas: health status and determinants, health care utilization, health care resources, and health care expenditures. A companion report—Health, United States: In Brief—features information extracted from the full report. The complete report and related data products are available on the Health, United States website at: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/hus.htm.

Centers Serving High Percentages of Young Hispanic Children Compare Favorably to Other Centers on Key Predictors of Quality

Source: Child Trends

Julia Mendez, Danielle Crosby, Lina Guzman, and Michael López (June 2017)

Download Predictors-of-Quality

Why research on low-income Hispanic children and families matters Hispanic or Latino children currently make up roughly 1 in 4 of all children in the United States, and by 2050 are projected to make up 1 in 3, similar to the number of white children. Given this increase, how Hispanic children fare will have a profound impact on the social and economic well-being of the country as a whole.

Notably, though, 5.7 million Hispanic children, or one third of all Hispanic children in the United States, are in poverty, more than in any other racial/ethnic group.

Nearly two thirds of Hispanic children live in low-income families, defined as having incomes of less than two times the federal poverty level.

Despite their high levels of economic need, Hispanics, particularly those in immigrant families, have lower rates of participation in many government support programs when compared with other racial/ ethnic minority groups.e-g High-quality, research-based information on the characteristics, experiences, and diversity of Hispanic children and families is needed to inform programs and policies supporting the sizable population of low-income Hispanic families and children.

Opioid Prescribing: Where you live matters

Source: Opioid Prescribing: Where you live matters

Download Opioid Factsheet

The amount of opioids prescribed in the US peaked in 2010 and then decreased each year through 2015. However, prescribing remains high and vary widely from county to county. Healthcare providers began using opioids in the late 1990s to treat chronic pain (not related to cancer), such as arthritis and back pain. As this continued, more opioid prescriptions were written, for more days per prescription, in higher doses. Taking opioids for longer periods of time or in higher doses increases the risk of addiction, overdose, and death. In 2015, six times more opioids per resident were dispensed in the highest-prescribing counties than in the lowest-prescribing counties. County-level characteristics, such as rural versus urban, income level, and demographics, only explained about a third of the differences. This suggests that people receive different care depending on where they live.  Healthcare providers have an important role in offering safer and more effective pain treatment.

Healthcare providers can:

  • Follow the CDC Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain, which includes recommendations such as:
    • Use opioids only when benefits are likely to outweigh risks.
    • Start with the lowest effective dose of immediate-release opioids.  For acute pain, prescribe only the number of days that the pain is expected to be severe enough to require opioids.
    • Reassess benefits and risks if considering dose increases.
  • Use state-based prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs) which help identify patients at risk of addiction or overdose.

Webcast: Disclosing Disability in the Workplace

Source: NIDILRR-funded Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Employment of People with Physical Disabilities (VCU-RRTC)

Webcast, Disclosing Disability in the Workplace

July 13th, 2-2:45pm ET. Registration is free and required.

This presentation will review the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments Act (ADAAA) pertaining to disclosure of disability in the workplace and examine the considerations that workers with disabilities must make in deciding whether to disclose.  Research findings from several recent studies of the disclosure decision will be presented.

Celebrate the ADA: Toolkit for 2017 Themes

Source: Project of the ADA National Network/

Celebrate the ADA

Throughout the year, celebrate the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the ADA Anniversary (July 26) in your workplaces, schools and communities. While much progress has been made, much remains to be done.

This Tool Kit is a project of the ADA National Network and its ten regional ADA Centers across the United States that provide information, guidance and training on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

Themes for June 2017

Olmstead Decision – 18th Anniversary (6/22)

Countdown to ADA Anniversary

Explore & Learn the ADA

Sharing ADA Stories

Recreation, Play & Travel

Voting Access

Questions on the ADA?

The ADA National Network and its ten regional ADA Centers located throughout the United States are your comprehensive “one-stop” resource for information, guidance and training on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

Contact your ADA Center in the ADA National Network at 1-800-949-4232.

Counties at Risk of Having No Insurer on the Marketplace (Exchange) in 2018

This map shows the counties at risk of having no insurer on the marketplace (exchange), created by the Affordable Care Act, in 2018, based on a Kaiser Family Foundation analysis of insurer rate filings and news reports

Source: Counties at Risk of Having No Insurer on the Marketplace (Exchange) in 2018 | The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation

Our historical analysis of insurer participation on the marketplaces from 2014-2017 can be found here.

These data are preliminary and subject to change as more information becomes public. Insurer participation in 2018 will not be finalized until the fall of 2017. It is possible that another insurer will expand into the counties that currently appear bare, and it is also possible that insurers will exit from other counties not shown on this map.

If a county has no exchange insurer, consumers would not be able to purchase marketplace plans with federal subsidies, including advanced premium tax credits (APTCs) and cost-sharing reductions (CSR). Tax credits make coverage more affordable throughout the year by lowering consumers’ monthly premium costs; cost-sharing reductions help lower out-of-pocket costs. In 2017, 8.7 million people (84% of all marketplace enrollees) received tax credits to cover a share of their premium and 5.9 million people (57% of all marketplace enrollees) received cost-sharing reductions.

This map only shows participation by on-exchange insurers. It is possible that some people in counties with no exchange insurers in 2018 will be able to purchase individual plans off-exchange, though this coverage would not qualify for financial assistance. If no exchange insurer participates in their county, people that rely on these subsidies may be unable to afford insurance off-exchange.

FDA announced its intention to extend the compliance date for the Nutrition Facts Label final rules

FDA announced its intention to extend the compliance date for the Nutrition Facts Label final rules

Source: Labeling & Nutrition > Changes to the Nutrition Facts Label

Original vs. New Format – Infographics to Help Understand the Changes (New Food Label Side by Side Comparacion Paralela)

Compliance Date

On June 13, 2017, the FDA announced its intention to extend the compliance date for the Nutrition Facts Label final rules. The FDA will provide details of the extension through a Federal Register Notice at a later time.

In May 2016, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration finalized the Nutrition Facts and Supplement Facts Label and Serving Size final rules and set the compliance date for July 26, 2018, with an additional year to comply for manufacturers with annual food sales of less than $10 million. After those rules were finalized, industry and consumer groups provided the FDA with feedback regarding the compliance dates.

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Above-normal blood sugar linked to dementia – Harvard Health Blog – Harvard Health Publications

There are many reasons to keep your blood sugar under control: protecting your arteries and nerves are two of them. Here’s another biggie: preventing dementia, the loss of memory and thinking skills that afflicts millions of older Americans. A study published in the New England Journal of Medicine shows that even in people without diabetes, above normal blood sugar is associated with an increased risk of developing dementia.

Source: Above-normal blood sugar linked to dementia – Harvard Health Blog – Harvard Health Publications

There are many reasons to keep your blood sugar under control: protecting your arteries and nerves are two of them. Here’s another biggie: preventing dementia, the loss of memory and thinking skills that afflicts millions of older Americans.

A study published in the New England Journal of Medicine shows that even in people without diabetes, above normal blood sugar is associated with an increased risk of developing dementia. This finding goes beyond previously seen links between diabetes and dementia. “It establishes for the first time, convincingly, that there is a link between dementia and elevated blood sugars in the non-diabetic range,” says study author Dr. David Nathan, a Harvard Medical School professor and the director of the Diabetes Center and Clinical Research Center at Massachusetts General Hospital.

Dr. Nathan teamed up with researchers across the country to look at blood sugar levels in more than 2,000 older adults—the average age was 76—taking part in the Adult Changes in Thought study. The vast majority of the study participants did not have diabetes. What the researchers found is that any incremental increase in blood sugar was associated with an increased risk of dementia—the higher the blood sugar, the higher the risk.

Why? There are only theories. “The speculation is that elevated blood sugar levels are causing more vascular disease, but it may be other metabolic issues. For example, people with elevated blood sugar often have insulin resistance which may be the link that affects our brain cells,” says Dr. Nathan.

The study does not prove that high blood sugar causes dementia, only that there is an association between the two. For that reason, don’t start trying to lower your blood sugar simply to preserve your thinking skills, cautions Dr. Nathan. There’s no evidence that strategy will work, although he says it should be studied.

But it is worth keeping an eye on your blood sugar to try to avoid developing type 2 diabetes. This disease is at epidemic proportions. Almost 26 million Americans—one in 12—have diabetes. High blood sugar is hallmark of this disease. Normal blood sugar is under 100 milligrams per deciliter of blood mg/dL after an eight-hour fast. You have diabetes if your blood sugar is 126 mg/dL or higher after a fast. People with a blood sugar reading of above 100 but below 126 have what’s called prediabetes. Nearly 80 million Americans are in that camp.

Excess blood sugar is a problem because it can lead to a variety of health problems including heart, eye, kidney, and nerve disease.

Taming blood sugar

What if your blood sugar is above normal? There’s good news in that department: You can lower your blood sugar by exercising and, if needed, losing weight. Shifting to a healthier diet with more vegetables, fruits, and whole grains and cutting back on highly refined grains can also help.

Try to get 150 minutes per week of moderate intensity activity, such as brisk walking. If that’s daunting, know that even a little activity can make a big difference in lowering blood sugar levels. Short but frequent walking breaks—as brief as a minute and forty seconds every half hour—can lower blood sugar. So can taking a walk after a meal.

And it doesn’t always have to be official “exercise.” Try taking the stairs more often, parking farther away from the store, and getting up and moving if you’ve been sitting too long. “It’s common sense,” says Dr. Nathan. “The more active you are and the less sedentary, the more likely it is that your muscles can uptake glucose, and the insulin you make will be more effective.”

Also helpful is cutting back your intake of highly refined carbohydrates, especially foods with added sugars such as sucrose, high fructose corn syrup, and also molasses, cane sugar, corn sweetener, raw sugar, syrup, honey or fruit juice concentrates. The American Heart Association recommends no more than 100 calories from sugar or six teaspoons of sugar per day for women, and 150 calories or nine teaspoons of sugar per day for men. If you’re in the prediabetic or diabetic range, you’ll want to work with a dietitian to determine your exact needs.

Making these changes is an investment, to be sure. But the payoff—better physical and mental health—is definitely worth it.

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Embedding Cultural Diversity and Cultural and Linguistic Competence: A Guide for UCEDD Curricula and Training Activities

Source: UCEDDs at Georgetown, Georgia State, and Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, and in collaboration with AUCD

A new project and website from the UCEDDs at Georgetown, Georgia State, and Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, and in collaboration with AUCD.
This project is designed to research, develop, and disseminate a set or resources for the national network of University Centers for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (UCEDDs) to embed cultural diversity and cultural and linguistic competence (CLC) in their curricula and training activities. The project will build the capacity of network programs to embed widely accepted CLC policies, structures, and practices across the four UCEDD core functions of pre-service training and continuing education, community services, research, and information dissemination. The project has a special focus on unserved and underserved communities in the United States, its territories, and tribal communities.