Incorporate Reasonable Accommodation Practices into your Onboarding Process

Incorporate Reasonable Accommodation Practices into your Onboarding Process
by Ann Hirsh, Job Accommodations Network, Volume 10, Issue 2, Second Quarter, 2012
Spring is in full swing and there are signs indicating an upcoming increase in the hiring of people with disabilities in both the Federal and private sectors. With Federal Executive Order 13548 – Increasing Federal Employment of Individuals with Disabilities and the potential changes for Federal contractors in the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs’ (OFCCP) Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) for Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act, employers would be wise to review their onboarding processes.

The purpose of an onboarding process is to smoothly integrate new employees into their positions and company culture. If you already have an onboarding process, does your process consider reasonable accommodation issues for your new employees who may happen to have a disability? It should. Take a look at your process and see if you need to incorporate the following reasonable accommodation considerations.

Being Bullied Tied to Anxiety, Depression in Special-Needs Kids

Being Bullied Tied to Anxiety, Depression in Special-Needs Kids
by American Academy of Pediatrics, news release, April 29, 2012

More than chronic conditions themselves, maltreatment by peers added to mental distress in small study.
SUNDAY, April 29 (HealthDay News) — Special-needs youth with chronic medical conditions or developmental disabilities are at risk for anxiety and depression if they’re excluded, ignored or bullied by other young people, a new small study says.
It included 109 youngsters, ages 8 to 17, who were recruited during routine visits to a U.S. children’s hospital. The patients and their parents completed questionnaires that screen for symptoms of anxiety and depression, and the youngsters also completed a questionnaire that asked them about bullying or exclusion by their peers.
The patients in the study had one or more conditions such as: attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (39 percent); cystic fibrosis (22 percent); type 1 or 2 diabetes (19 percent); sickle cell disease (11 percent); obesity (11 percent); learning disability (11 percent); autism (9 percent); and short stature (6 percent).

Making the Most of College Visits

Making the Most of College Visits
by Margie Hatch, NCWD Youth, Posted on April 16, 2012

Posted on April 16, 2012 by NCWD Youth
Today’s blog provides guidance to youth about visiting colleges and other postsecondary institutions to help make informed decisions.
For many of you, spring break is your chance to sleep in, hang out with friends, or take a vacation with your family; however, for juniors just starting their college search and for seniors making their final selection, spring is the prime time for visiting college campuses. As exciting as it is to dream of your new life after high school, college planning can be time consuming and stressful. Choosing the right college is an important decision and takes a lot of prep work.
By now you may have read your fair share of the college brochures and view books that flood your mailbox. After these first impressions you may be thinking, “School A has the most beautiful campus and, wow, how great would it be to attend  School B (I’m the biggest fan of their basketball team!), and School C is a top ranked schools on the U.S. News & World Report – how do I choose?”

JAN Accommodation and Compliance Series: Nurses with Disabilities


Occupation and Industry Series:
Accommodating Nurses with Disabilities

JAN’s Occupation and Industry Series is designed to help employers determine effective accommodations for their employees with disabilities and comply with title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Each publication in the series addresses a specific occupation or industry and provides information about that occupation or industry, ADA issues, accommodation ideas, and resources for additional information.

Building an Inclusive Workforce: A Four-Step Reference Guide to Recruiting, Hiring, and Retaining Employees with Disabilities


Office of Disability Employment Policy (
ODEP), U.S. Department of Labor (DOL)

The Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP), U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) has published this four-step reference guide to recruiting, hiring, and retaining employees with disabilities. This colorful resource includes examples of inclusive workplaces and links to many different resources for employers and those who encourage inclusive employment.
Building an Inclusive Workforce

A Chance to See Disabilities as Assets

A Chance to See Disabilities as Assets
By PEGGY KLAUS
New York Times
Published: February 4, 2012

MANY people know of Berkeley, Calif., as the birthplace, in the 1960’s, of the Free Speech Movement. Fewer people know that Berkeley also played a major role in the disability rights movement. It was here, also in the ’60s, that Ed Roberts — a student with quadriplegia — became an outspoken advocate of the cause.

Nurses With Disabilities: Another Minority Group

by Ruth Carol
MinorityNurse
People with disabilities are one of the most underrepresented voices in nursing. But like nurses of color, they have a lot to say about overcoming discrimination and barriers to take their rightful place in the profession.

Some people who dream of nursing careers are told they will never make it through nursing school. Some nurses who hear about a potential dream job are told they won’t even be considered a candidate for the position. Some are even told they have no business pursuing or continuing a career in health care altogether.

Although many of these nurses are not members of racial or ethnic minority groups, they are still a minority within the nursing profession. They are nurses with disabilities.

Bring Down the Barriers—Seen and Unseen By Rachel Adams

by Rachel Adams

The Chronicle

A colleague in a wheelchair goes into an underground passage connecting two campus buildings. Once the entrance locks behind him, he discovers that the door at the other end refuses to open with his swipe card. Although he is a vigorous man of middle age, the maintenance worker who comes to his rescue calls him Pops.

A student with a sensory-processing disorder needs to sit in the front row of class and take notes on a laptop computer, but the professor insists that laptops may be used only in the back of the room. After the student explains her situation, he announces to the entire class that he is making a “special exception” for her.

I heard these and other stories about broken elevators, stairs without handrails, and inaccessible bathrooms at a recent panel on disability and the university that I organized on campus for students, faculty, and staff from our Office of Disability Services.