Healthy Relationships and Healthy Sexuality for People with Developmental Disability

RRTCDD 2016/17 Fall/Winter Health and Wellness Series

Presenter: Susan Kahan, MA, LCPC (skahan@uic.edu)

Play recording (1 hr 4 min)

Download Sexuality and Healthy Relationships PowerPoint Presentation 

Thursday, January 19, 2017

3:00pm | Eastern Daylight Time

Presenter Biosketch:

Susan is the clinical staff at the University of Illinois at Chicago Developmental Disability Family Clinics, Susan, provides individual and group therapy for clients with a broad range of mental health and behavioral concerns, with a special focus on trauma and sexual abuse of individuals with disabilities. Susan’s clients include children, adolescents and adults. As a member of the Coalition Against Sexual Abuse of Children with Disabilities, she provides consultation and training on trauma-focused intervention for children with disabilities to both trauma and disability agencies, and has spoken at national and international conferences on sexual abuse prevention and intervention for people with IDD. She also provides consultation on working with children with disabilities for law enforcement and child protection agencies. In addition, Susan conducts trainings on healthy sexuality and sexual abuse prevention for provider agencies, schools and parent groups.

Abstract

Everyone desires to love and be loved. The myths and misconceptions about people with intellectual and developmental disability (IDD) often lead to rules and restrictions that make healthy relationships difficult to obtain. This webinar will explore the facts and myths around relationships and sexuality for people with IDD. We will discuss the importance of laying the foundation for healthy relations early on through social skills and sexuality education. Resources and strategies for teaching healthy sexuality will be presented. In addition, we will discuss the role of healthy sexuality education as a primary prevention tool for sexual abuse and other strategies to promote sexual abuse prevention.

Learning Objectives

  1. Understand the myths and misperceptions about individuals with IDD and their impact access to education on healthy relationships and sexuality.
  2. Identify tools and strategies for teaching individuals with IDD about healthy relationships and sexuality.
  3. Understand the role of healthy relationship and sexuality education as a primary sexual abuse prevention strategy.

Smoking Among Ohioans with Disabilities

The Ohio Disability and Health Program has developed a fact sheet to raise awareness regarding smoking disparities faced by Ohioans with disabilities.

http://go.osu.edu/ODHPsmokingfacts2018 or download ODHP_Smoking-Factsheet-2018.

For further information, please contact Ann Robinson, Program Coordinator, Ohio Disability and Health Program.

Overview Smoking accounts for half a million deaths every year and is of particular concern among people with disabilities (PWD). PWD have unmet healthcare needs and disparities in overall health, chronic health conditions, and health risk behaviors. People with disabilities are especially at risk for smoking and smoking-related illness. According to 2014 data, approximately 662,107 people with disabilities in the United States were current smokers, half of whom reported trying to quit within the past year. Ohio has one of the highest smoking rate disparities (18.5%) in the United States for people with disabilities compared to people without disabilities. These findings suggest a need for effective and targeted smoking cessation programs that are accessible and culturally appropriate for people with disabilities.

Broad PCORI Funding Announcements – Cycle 1 2018 (for Addressing Disparities, Assessment of Options, Communication and Dissemination Research, Improving Healthcare Systems) | PCORI

Source: Broad PCORI Funding Announcements – Cycle 1 2018 (for Addressing Disparities, Assessment of Options, Communication and Dissemination Research, Improving Healthcare Systems) | PCORI

Letters of Intent are due Tuesday, February 13, 2018, by 5:00 p.m. ET.
Those selected to submit a full application will be notified by Wednesday, March 14, 2018.
Full applications are due Wednesday, May 16, 2018, by 5:00 p.m. ET.

The Broad PCORI Funding Announcements (PFAs) seek investigator-initiated applications for patient-centered comparative clinical effectiveness research (CER) projects aligned with our priority areas for research. This PFA covers the following four priority areas: Addressing Disparities; Assessment of Prevention, Diagnosis, and Treatment Options; Assessment of Prevention, Diagnosis, and Treatment Options; Communication and Dissemination Research; and Improving Healthcare Systems. We are looking for your best ideas to address needs of patients, caregivers, clinicians, and other healthcare stakeholders in making personalized clinical decisions across a wide range of conditions, populations, and treatments.

These broad areas encompass the patient-centered comparative clinical effectiveness research we support. As our work progresses and we engage with a broad range of patients, caregivers, clinicians, and other healthcare stakeholders, we may develop additional national priorities for research.

Our National Priorities for Research and Research Agenda is a framework to guide our funding of comparative clinical effectiveness research that will give patients and those who care for them the ability to make better-informed health decisions. The framework was developed by workgroups of our Board of Governors, members of our Methodology Committee, and staff. It was revised in response to public comments and accepted by the Board on May 21, 2012.

Deborah Munroe Noonan Memorial Research Fund – Health Resource in Action

Source: Deborah Munroe Noonan Memorial Research Fund – Health Resource in Action

The Deborah Munroe Noonan Memorial Research Fund, established in 1947 by Frank M. Noonan in memory of his mother, continues its proud tradition of supporting improvements in the quality of life for children with disabilities with one-year grants up to $80,000 (inclusive of 20% indirect costs). Recognizing that children’s health services and supports are provided in a wide range of community settings as well as hospitals, the Noonan Research program welcomes research proposals from both nonprofit organizations and academic institutions that serve children with physical or developmental disabilities and associated health-related complications. Eligible organizations and target populations must be within the Fund’s geographic area of interest of Greater Boston. Neither a faculty position nor an advanced degree is required.

The Sara Elizabeth O’Brien Trust, Bank of America, N.A., Trustee, will support up to one additional project submitted to the Noonan Research Fund focusing on medical research related to blindness in children and adolescents.  Please note, the O’Brien Trust does not fund work on other visual impairments, e.g., strabismus. The O’Brien Trust is not restricted to the Noonan geography specified by the Noonan Research program.

Proposals for basic science research will not be considered (except for proposals focused on blindness funded by the O’Brien Trust), nor will applications for capital costs such as buildings, renovations, or major equipment items. The Noonan Fund does not support direct service, primary prevention projects, or primary medical conditions such as obesity or device development. Drug trials are not supported by the Noonan Research Fund.

Compounded Disparities: Health Equity at the Intersection of Disability, Race, and Ethnicity

Source: Compounded Disparities: Health Equity at the Intersection of Disability, Race, and Ethnicity – NEW : Health and Medicine Division

DOWNLOAD PDF: Compounded Disparities – Intersection of Disabilities Race and Ethnicity

At the intersection of chronic disease, disability and health services research: A scoping literature review

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dhjo.2017.12.012

Abstract

Background

There is a concerted effort underway to evaluate and reform our nation’s approach to the health of people with ongoing or elevated needs for care, particularly persons with chronic conditions and/or disabilities.

Objective

This literature review characterizes the current state of knowledge on the measurement of chronic disease and disability in population-based health services research on working age adults (age 18-64).

Methods

Scoping review methods were used to scan the health services research literature published since the year 2000, including medline, psycINFO and manual searches. The guiding question was: “How are chronic conditions and disability defined and measured in studies of healthcare access, quality, utilization or cost?”

Results

Fifty-five studies met the stated inclusion criteria. Chronic conditions were variously defined by brief lists of conditions, broader criteria-based lists, two or more (multiple) chronic conditions, or other constructs. Disability was generally assessed through ADLs/IADLs, functional limitations, activity limitations or program eligibility. A smaller subset of studies used information from both domains to identify a study population or to stratify it by subgroup.

Conclusions

There remains a divide in this literature between studies that rely upon diagnostically-oriented measures and studies that instead rely on functional, activity or other constructs of disability to identify the population of interest. This leads to wide ranging differences in population prevalence and outcome estimates. However, there is also a growing effort to develop methods that account for the overlap between chronic disease and disability and to “segment” this heterogeneous population into policy or practice relevant subgroups.

  • a The Heller School for Social Policy and Management, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA, United States
  • b National Institutes of Health, Clinical Research Center, Rehabilitation Medicine Department, Bethesda, MD, United States
  • c John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, United States
  • d Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, United States
  • e Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, GA, United States
  • f University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, United States
  • g University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, United States

The Guide to Community Preventive Services and Disability Inclusion

Source: The Guide to Community Preventive Services and Disability Inclusion – ScienceDirect

Why is this important?

  • One in five adults in the United States have some type of disability (CDC, 2017).
  • Adults with disabilities are more likely to be obese, smoke, have high blood pressure, and be physically inactive than adults without disabilities(CDC, 2017).
  • Increased risk for medical conditions, such as heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and some cancers are also more common among adults with disabilities (CDC, 2017).

Introduction

Approximately 40 million people in the U.S. identify as having a serious disability, and people with disabilities experience many health disparitiescompared with the general population. The Guide to Community Preventive Services (The Community Guide) identifies evidence-based programs and policies recommended by the Community Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) to promote health and prevent disease. The Community Guide was assessed to answer the questions: are Community Guide public health intervention recommendations applicable to people with disabilities, and are adaptations required?

Methods

An assessment of 91 recommendations from The Community Guide was conducted for 15 health topics by qualitative analysis involving three data approaches: an integrative literature review (years 1980–2011), key informant interviews, and focus group discussion during 2011.

Results

Twenty-six recommended interventions would not need any adaptation to be of benefit to people with disabilities. Forty-one recommended interventions could benefit from adaptations in communication and technology; 33 could benefit from training adaptations; 31 from physical accessibility adaptations; and 16 could benefit from other adaptations, such as written policy changes and creation of peer support networks. Thirty-eight recommended interventions could benefit from one or more adaptations to enhance disability inclusion.

Conclusions

As public health and healthcare systems implement Task Force recommendations, identifying and addressing barriers to full participation for people with disabilities is important so that interventions reach the entire population. With appropriate adaptations, implementation of recommendations from The Community Guide could be successfully expanded to address the needs of people with disabilities.

Disability Healthcare Training – Nisonger Center

Access two courses that are approved for continuing education by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for physicians, nurses, certified health education specialists and other health professionals.

Source: Disability Healthcare Training – Nisonger Center

The Ohio Disability and Health Program has developed online training modules that are designed to increase the capacity of health care providers to provide quality healthcare for persons with disabilities. The two courses are approved for continuing education by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for health professionals in multiple areas. For more information, please visit:

http://nisonger.osu.edu/education-training/ohio-disability-health-program/disability-healthcare-training/

Please contact Ann Robinson (contact information below) for further information.

Abused And Betrayed: People With Intellectual Disabilities And An Epidemic Of Sexual Assault : NPR

Source: Abused And Betrayed: People With Intellectual Disabilities And An Epidemic Of Sexual Assault : NPR

NPR Special Series: Abused and Betrayed: People with Intellectual Disabilities and an Epidemic of Sexual Assault
https://www.npr.org/series/575502633/abused-and-betrayed
At a moment of reckoning in the United States about sexual harassment and sexual assault, a yearlong NPR investigation finds that there’s little recognition of a group of Americans that is one of the most at risk: adults with intellectual disabilities. The series starts on Monday, January 8 and runs through January 18th.