Transition of Young Adults with Developmental Disabilities to Adult-Systems of Care

2017/03/16
2pm – 3pm CST

REGISTER HERE

Presented by: Kruti Acharya, MD

Dr. Acharya will review the most recent data about health care transition for adolescents and young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). During the webinar, she will describe standard of care for health care transition and highlight strategies to support the transition to adult-centered health care for this population.

Dr. Acharya is a board certified developmental and behavioral pediatrician and internist at the University of Illinois at Chicago and the director of the Illinois Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental Disabilities (LEND) Program. Dr. Acharya cares for individuals with developmental disabilities using a lifespan perspective from childhood to adulthood. She is particularly interested in supporting adolescents and young adults with developmental disabilities as they transition to adult-systems of care and beyond.

Small Steps, Big Leaps: Healthy Vending in Your Organization

2017/04/06
2:00 to 3:00 pm CST

This presentation provides strategies for healthier vending options through the following: (i) steps to developing healthy vending machine initiative; (ii) using tools to survey vending machines and implementing new guidelines; and, (iii) integrating examples and links to resources related to healthy vending machine for your initiative.

Audience: Providers who provide Supports for Community Living services to people with IDD and others seeking to increase healthy options in their organization’s vending machines.

Presenters: Jasmina Sisirak, PhD, MPH and Kristin Krok, CTRS

Vending PowerPoint Presentation

Transcript “Small Steps BIG LEAPS” Presentation 4-6-17

View Presentation

Handouts

  1. Healthy Vending Guidelines
  2. Healthy Vending
  3. Vending Machine Inventory Tool
  4. Vending Policy Example

Citation: Sisirak, J. & Krok, K. (2017). Small Steps, Big Leaps: Healthy Vending in Your Organization. HealthMatters Community of Practice Webinar Series. RRTCDD: Chicago, IL.

Social Support Networks of Aging Persons with Intellectual Disabilities

2017/04/20
2pm – 3pm CST

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Presented by: Lieke van Heumen, PhD

This webinar will discuss emerging research and practice in supporting social networks of adults aging with intellectual disabilities. After a brief introduction on aging in this population, the webinar will discuss the role of social relations in later life and address the state of knowledge regarding the social support networks of older adults with intellectual disabilities. The webinar will provide a discussion of the role of support services in promoting informal networks and conclude with an exploration of the use of social network mapping and life story work in person-centered planning.

Lieke van Heumen is a postdoctoral research fellow at the Department of Disability and Human Development, University of Illinois at Chicago. Lieke’s primary research interest is the intersection of aging and disability with a focus on supports that contribute to aging well. She believes retrieving the lived experiences of older adults with disabilities by means of inclusive and accessible research methods is key to assuring the meaningful engagement of adults with disabilities in the research process.

Affordable Care Act Toolkit for Self-Advocates

The Affordable Care Act Toolkit for Self-Advocates was put together by the Autism Self Advocacy Network ( ASAN) to “equip self-advocates to participate in important conversations about our lives and the services we rely on.”

Affordable Care Act Toolkit for Self-Advocates

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) made it easier to get health insurance for all Americans, including people with disabilities. But a lot of the information out there about the ACA and attempts to repeal it can be difficult to understand and navigate. That’s why the Autistic Self Advocacy Network (ASAN) released a plain language Affordable Care Act Toolkit for Self-Advocates, part of which was funded by the Special Hope Foundation.

Translational Research to Help Older Adults Maintain Their Health and Independence in the Community (R21)

This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites applications using the R21 award mechanism for translational research that moves evidence-based research findings toward the development of new interventions, programs,policies, practices, and tools that can be used by organizations in the community to help older adults remain healthy and independent, productively engaged, and living in their own homes and communities. The goal of this FOA is to support translational research involving collaborations between academic research centers and community-based organizations with expertise serving or engaging older adults (such as city and state health departments, city/town leadership councils, educational institutions, workplaces, Area Agencies on Aging, and organizations funded or assisted by the Corporation for National and Community Service) that will enhance our understanding of practical tools, techniques, programs and policies that communities across the nation can use to more effectively respond to needs of the aging population.
Standard Dates – Expiration Date May 8, 2017
Direct costs are limited to $275,000 over an R21 two-year period, with no more than $200,000 in direct costs allowed in any single year.

Policies for Action: Policy and Law Research to Build a Culture of Health

2017 Call for Proposals

Purpose

Policies for Action: Policy and Law Research to Build a Culture of Health (P4A) was created to help build the evidence base for policies that can help build a Culture of Health. P4A seeks to engage long-standing health care, mental and behavioral health, and public health researchers, as well as experts in areas that we recognize have strong influence on health, well-being and equity—such as labor, criminal justice, education, transportation, housing, and the built environment.The research funded under this call for proposals (CFP) should help fill significant gaps in our knowledge about what policies can serve as positive drivers of change, including how the social determinants of health can be used to achieve improvements in population health, well-being, and equity. Additional information on this program can be found at policiesforaction.org.

Key Dates

February 15, 2017 (1 p.m. ET)
Optional applicant Web conference call. Registration is requiredMarch 10, 2017 (3 p.m. ET)
Deadline for receipt of brief proposals.Early May 2017
Notification to brief proposal applicants, including invitations to submit full proposals.

June 16, 2017 (3 p.m. ET)
Deadline for receipt of invited full proposals.

Early to mid-August 2017
Notification to full proposal applicants, including invitations to finalists to proceed with grant initiations.

October 1, 2017
Grants initiated.

Community Partnerships to Advance Research (CPAR) (R15)

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-14-140.html

https://www.nichd.nih.gov/grants-funding/opportunities-mechanisms/mechanisms-types/comparison-mechanisms/Pages/default.aspx

Current Closing Date for Applications: May 07, 2017

Applicants may request up to $300,000 in direct costs plus applicable Facilities & Administrative (F&A)/indirect costs for the entire project period of up to 3 years.

This funding opportunity announcement addresses the need for researchers to partner with communities using Community Engaged Research (CEnR) methodologies that will enhance relationships leading to better interventions and positive health outcomes. Partnership is defined as an association of two or more persons or entities that conduct a study as equal co-investigators. Community Engagement (CE) lies on a continuum that reflects the level of involvement of community members, or representatives of community populations, in research. This continuum of involvement in research efforts ranges from community consent to research, to full participation and shared leadership of community members in research design and eventual dissemination and implementation.  Advances in translating research findings into practice have been made; however, such advances have not been realized by all members of society according to age, race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic group. Narrowing the gap in translational research within the NINR strategic areas of emphasis is a priority for the Institute. Using CE approaches and addressing areas such as self and symptom management, health promotion and prevention is one way to narrow the gap. CE can take many forms, and partners can include community based groups, agencies such as the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) innovation centers, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) prevention Research Centers, Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) Community Health Centers (CHC) and Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHC), other academic health institutions, or individuals. Collaborators may be engaged in health promotion/prevention, clinical or intervention research.

Community Partnerships to Advance Research (CPAR) (R01)

http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/search-grants.html?keywords=PA-14-142
https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-14-142.html

Current Closing Date for Applications: May 07, 2017

Requests of $500,000 or more for direct costs in any year

This funding opportunity announcement addresses the need for researchers to partner with communities using Community Engaged Research (CEnR) methodologies that will enhance relationships leading to better interventions and positive health outcomes. Partnership is defined as an association of two or more persons or entities that conduct a study as equal co-investigators. Community Engagement (CE) lies on a continuum that reflects the level of involvement of community members, or representatives of community populations, in research. This continuum of involvement in research efforts ranges from community consent to research, to full participation and shared leadership of community members in research design and eventual dissemination and implementation.  Advances in translating research findings into practice have been made; however, such advances have not been realized by all members of society according to age, race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic group. Narrowing the gap in translational research within the NINR strategic areas of emphasis is a priority for the Institute. Using CE approaches and addressing areas such as self and symptom management, health promotion and prevention is one way to narrow the gap. CE can take many forms, and partners can include community based groups, agencies such as the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) innovation centers, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) prevention Research Centers, Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) Community Health Centers (CHC) and Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHC), other academic health institutions, or individuals. Collaborators may be engaged in health promotion/prevention, clinical or intervention research.

Limited PCORI Funding Announcement: Dissemination and Implementation of PCORI

Research Dissemination and Implementation Award

Letter of Intent (LOI) Deadline
February 14, 2017
Application Deadline
May 17, 2017
Total Direct Costs 
$350,000

This Notice encourages PCORI awardees and their patient and stakeholder partners with strategic plans for disseminating and implementing the research results of their PCORI comparative, clinical effectiveness research (CER) awards to consider applying for this forthcoming funding announcement.

PCORI seeks to support the dissemination and implementation (D&I) of patient-centered CER results obtained from PCORI-funded studies.  This opportunity will give PCORI investigators the chance, following the generation of results from their PCORI research award, to propose the next step(s) for making their research results more useful, actionable, and accessible to targeted end-users. This announcement is designed to promote and facilitate the effective and timely use of research evidence in the real world.

Through this PFA, PCORI seeks to fund projects designed to actively disseminate and implement PCORI research results using approaches that are informed and guided by established dissemination and implementation models and frameworks. Successful applications will propose a logical and feasible next step for D&I of clinically meaningful CER finding(s) in order to improve CER finding accessibility, usefulness, uptake, and/or impact among targeted end-users, along with an evaluation plan focusing on an appropriate balance of measurable process and short-, intermediate-, and longer-term outcomes to capture timely information on the effectiveness of the proposed D&I activities.

Specific strategies proposed for disseminating and implementing results of PCORI-funded research projects will vary based on a host of factors, including the finding being disseminated, the population(s) being targeted, and the goals of the D&I effort. PCORI encourages applicants to work closely with relevant stakeholder groups to identify appropriate D&I strategies.  All proposed D&I strategies must actively disseminate/implement findings to targeted end-users and evaluate the success of the D&I strategy. Applications proposing to translate or adapt a finding or product without a plan to actively disseminate or implement it will not be considered responsive.

Examples of appropriate projects include, among others, efforts to:

  • Develop, demonstrate, and evaluate approaches for incorporating results of PCORI-funded research into decision-making settings for patients, providers, policy makers, and other stakeholders.
  • Adapt the content, format, or vehicle for delivering CER research evidence to improve its penetration and use at the policy, health systems, clinical practice, caregiver, and patient levels.
  • Demonstrate the capacity and ability to take research results found effective through PCORI research studies “to scale” in diverse settings and populations.
  • De-implement or reduce the use of interventions that are not evidence based, have been widely adopted prematurely, or are harmful or wasteful.

AHRQ Health Services Research Demonstration and Dissemination Grants (R18)

 May 25, 2017

The Research Demonstration and Dissemination Grant (R18) is an award made by AHRQ to an institution/organization to support a discrete, specified health services research project. The project will be performed by the named investigator and study team. The R18 research plan proposed by the applicant institution/organization must be related to the mission and priority research interests of AHRQ.

The total costs (direct and indirect costs) awarded to a grant under this FOA will not exceed $400,000 annually for the entire project period. An application with a budget that exceeds $400,000 total costs in any given year will not be reviewed