Resources within Reason: The Evidence for Inclusion

http://unc.live/2k770gM

“Did you ever have someone ask you for a definition of inclusion? Or did you ever wish you could quickly access the research that documents the benefits of inclusion for young children with and without disabilities? If you answered yes, you may find this issue of Resources within Reason useful. It features resources that will help you quickly pull up and share definitions, research findings, and access essential examples of the evidence for inclusion. These materials may be used to raise awareness, support planning, offer strategies, and hopefully, change attitudes…”

Staying Healthy and Connecting with Neighbors May Help People with Mobility Disabilities Stay Involved in Their Communities

http://bit.ly/2knur2z

People with mobility disabilities have difficulty standing, walking, or climbing stairs. Because of such difficulty, they may have trouble participating in recreational, social, civic, or religious activities in their communities. The participation limitation may stem from physical problems such as pain or fatigue, from environmental barriers like living in areas without public transportation, or both. People with mobility disabilities may have an easier time participating in their communities if they live in safe and well-connected cohesive neighborhoods where neighbors help each other, and if they have high self-efficacy– a belief in themselves and their ability to manage life’s demands. In a recent NIDILRR-funded study, researchers looked at the connections between health and function, neighborhood supports, self-efficacy, and community participation for people with mobility disabilities. The researchers wanted to find out which types of community activities people with mobility disabilities consider most important, and how their health and function, neighborhood supports, and self-efficacy affect their community participation.

Aging and Dementia Care for People with Intellectual Disabilities

 Thursday, February 16, 2017

3:00pm | Eastern Daylight Time

Presented by: Matthew Janicki, PhD

Many organizations are seeing the aging of their clientele and their numbers increase, and concerns are growing about how to deal with age-associated effects evidenced with aging. One such age-associated condition, Alzheimer’s disease (and related dementias), affects a significant number of adults with Down syndrome (about 65% of adults age more than 60) and a proportional number of adults with other causes of intellectual disability (about 6% of adults age more than 60). Many at-risk adults live on their own or with friends, and many affected adults live in small community group homes or with their families. How to provide sound and responsive community care is becoming a challenge for agencies faced with an increasing number of such affected adults. This webinar covers key elements of dementia and how it affects adults with intellectual disabilities, provides a brief overview of screening and assessment strategies and methods, and examines ways that organizations can employ to adapt their current services to make them dementia capable. Specifically covered are the elements and types of dementia, as well its onset, duration and effect, and techniques for adapting environments, aiding with staff interactions and communication, as well as challenges to active and supportive programming. Models for supports depending on the stage of dementia are also discussed, as are training foci areas and community care models that provide for “dementia capable” supports and services. Special attention is given to the use of group homes as a viable community care model.

Matthew P. Janicki, Ph.D. is the co-chair of the US National Task Group on Intellectual Disabilities and Dementia Practices, research associate professor in the Department of Disability and Human Development at the University of Illinois at Chicago and Director for Technical Assistance for the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Developmental Disabilities and Health (RRTCDD) at the University.

 Play recording (1 hr 4 min)

Webinar-4_Janicki

HealthMatters Program Team Consulting on Walmart Foundation Grant to AUCD “Nutrition is for Everyone”

Walmart Foundation Grant to AUCD Expands Nutrition Efforts for People with Disabilities in Four States

SILVER SPRING, MD – The Association of University Centers on Disabilities (AUCD) is pleased to announce that the Walmart Foundation has granted AUCD and four of its member Centers $300,000 to launch the “Nutrition is for Everyone” project. This one-year pilot project will provide nutrition education for an estimated 20,000 people in the disability community across Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, and Tennessee.

Based on public health data, the four selected states were identified as areas where people with disabilities are least likely to be consuming fruits and vegetables and therefore in the most need for nutrition education and support. The “Nutrition is for Everyone” program design employs “ Nutrition Ambassadors,” trained experts from the AUCD network and local community who will help people with disabilities, as well as their families and friends, develop the knowledge and skills to necessary to make healthy decisions about their nutrition needs.

“We are thrilled that AUCD was selected for this collaborative funding that benefits the field,” said Andy Imparato, AUCD’s Executive Director. “This is the first time the Walmart Foundation will support direct training people with disabilities and community members on nutrition, and we are confident the project will have a positive impact on the health of people with disabilities in Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, and Tennessee.”

The network Centers collaborating on this effort will receive over $190,000 in combined funding to facilitate the program, in which they will competitively select a state “Nutrition Ambassador.” Ambassadors will develop a tailored work plan based on their state’s specific needs. Ambassadors will provide training for community members with disabilities and their friends and families, to increase the number of people with disabilities receiving nutrition education and subsequently increase the rates of consumption of fruits and vegetables for people with disabilities.

Nutrition and disability experts from the Institute on Disability and Human Development, AUCD’s member Center at the University of Illinois in Chicago, will serve as consultant advisors, sharing lessons learned from “HealthMatters Program,” a program that builds capacity for organizations across the country to implement health promotion programs for people with developmental disabilities.
The four Centers working with Nutrition Ambassadors and AUCD on this project are:

Partners for Inclusive Communities at the University of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR

Since 1994, Partners for Inclusive Communities (Partners) has trained students to support people with disabilities and their families. Partners has graduated 74 nutrition students with 20 of those receiving more than 300 hours of training. Graduates have gone on to become credentialed as Registered Dietitians and Nutritionists.

Human Development Center at Louisiana State University, New Orleans, LA

Many projects at the Human Development Center focus on supporting the education and health of people with disabilities, as well as children and families from diverse and under-served populations. Current nutrition education and health literacy projects include the Early Head Start- Child Care Partnership, a federally funded collaboration with the Louisiana State University Agricultural Center to promote better nutrition and food safety in a cost-efficient, culturally sensitive manner.

Center for Learning and Leadership at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK

The Center for Learning and Leadership is located in the College of Medicine at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. The community relationships developed by this Center demonstrate a strong commitment to supporting self-advocates as they build capacity in their communities and enact systems change. The Center will draw on the research and guidance of academic associates at the College of Allied Health, as well as current research at the Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity Lab.

Boling Center for Developmental Disabilities (BCDD), University of Tennessee Health Science Center

The Boling Center for Developmental Disabilities (BCDD) will leverage its Act Early Ambassador experience with systems change in developmental monitoring to benefit “Nutrition is for Everyone.” BCDD is an interdisciplinary program that supports children and adults with developmental disabilities and their families through training, service, applied research, information dissemination, planning, and policy development. BCDD offers inclusive nutrition consultations across the lifespan for people with disabilities.

AUCD is a national, nonprofit network of centers in every state and territory working to advance policy and practice for people living with disabilities and their families. Learn more about AUCD and its Public Health is for Everyone program, which offers resources for public health professionals to create programs that benefit entire communities, including people with disabilities, by visiting www.aucd.org or on Twitter at @AUCDnews.

The mission of the Walmart Foundation is to create opportunities so people can live better. They provide grants to the thousands of organizations that share their mission. In 2014, Walmart and the Walmart Foundation gave $1.4 billion in cash and in-kind contributions around the world. Global in-kind donations accounted for $1 billion. Learn more at www.giving.walmart.com, or on Twitter at @WalmartGiving.

Dementia and Intellectual Disability Workshops

Dementia and Intellectual Disability Workshops

The National Task Group on Intellectual Disabilities and Dementia Practices (NTG) is offering a series of workshops on “Dementia Capable Care of Adults with Intellectual Disabilities and Dementia” at several locations over the next coming few months. This workshop is offered as a two-day “basic” course or a three-day “Train-the-Trainer” course. It is based on the newly developed, evidence-informed NTG Education and Training Curriculum on Dementia and Intellectual & Developmental Disabilities and is designed to complement the requirements for workforce skill enhancement under the National Plan to Address Alzheimer’s Disease. These workshops are appropriate for clinicians, program administrators, family caregivers, and staff with direct or ancillary care responsibilities of older adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities in disability-, health care-, and aging-related agencies.

The dates, locations, and registration information of the upcoming workshops in the San Diego, Topeka, Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, Worcester, and Chicago areas can be accessed via the NTG’s website at:
http://aadmd.org/ntg/schedule.

NTG is supported by the American Academy of Developmental Medicine and Dentistry and the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Developmental Disabilities and Health at the University of Illinois.

Contact Dr. K. Bishop at
bisbur1@earthlink.net.

Health Care Costs for Americans with I/DD: A National Analysis of Access and Spending 2002-2011 Based on the MEPS/NHIS

Health Care Costs for Americans with I/DD: A National Analysis of Access and Spending 2002-2011 Based on the MEPS/NHIS

Presenters: Glenn T Fujiura, Sandra Magaña, Henan Li, & Susan Parish


RRTCDD 2016 Health and Wellness Series Webinar

WebEx recording is available for viewing “Health Care Costs for Americans with I/DD: A National Analysis of Access and Spending 2002-2011 Based on the MEPS/NHIS” (
Recording) (PowerPoint Slides)

Impact: Feature Issue on Supporting Wellness for Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Impact: Feature Issue on Supporting Wellness for Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Volume 29 · Number 1 • Winter 2016

This issue is co-edited by Kelly Hsieh and includes articles about the HealthMatters study and intervention that is led by Jasmina Sisirak and Beth Marks and an article Tia Nelis.

Online in PDF at https://ici.umn.edu/products/impact/291/291.pdf and http://rrtcadd.org/resources/Impact_29_1_-Winter_2016.pdf.

The Experience of and Outcomes for People with I/DD and Their Families in Managed Health Care: Lessons Learned

The Experience of and Outcomes for People with I/DD and Their Families in Managed Health Care: Lessons Learned

Presenters: Tamar Heller, PhD and Randall Owen, PhD


RRTCDD 2016 Health and Wellness Series Webinar

WebEx recording is available for viewing “The Experience of and Outcomes for People with I/DD and Their Families in Managed Health Care: Lessons Learned” (
Recording) (PowerPoint Slides)

This webinar presents results from a four year evaluation of an integrated care program in which people transferred from fee–for-service Medicaid to managed health care. It will include innovative ways to assess the views of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities ( IDD ) regarding their health and healthcare, outcomes of the transition, and strategies resulting in better health care outcomes. Lessons learned will address the role of continuity of care, care coordination, consumer choice, and family involvement in meeting the health care needs of people with IDD and ways to improve these aspects.