Community Partnerships to Advance Research (CPAR) (R15)

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-14-140.html

https://www.nichd.nih.gov/grants-funding/opportunities-mechanisms/mechanisms-types/comparison-mechanisms/Pages/default.aspx

Current Closing Date for Applications: May 07, 2017

Applicants may request up to $300,000 in direct costs plus applicable Facilities & Administrative (F&A)/indirect costs for the entire project period of up to 3 years.

This funding opportunity announcement addresses the need for researchers to partner with communities using Community Engaged Research (CEnR) methodologies that will enhance relationships leading to better interventions and positive health outcomes. Partnership is defined as an association of two or more persons or entities that conduct a study as equal co-investigators. Community Engagement (CE) lies on a continuum that reflects the level of involvement of community members, or representatives of community populations, in research. This continuum of involvement in research efforts ranges from community consent to research, to full participation and shared leadership of community members in research design and eventual dissemination and implementation.  Advances in translating research findings into practice have been made; however, such advances have not been realized by all members of society according to age, race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic group. Narrowing the gap in translational research within the NINR strategic areas of emphasis is a priority for the Institute. Using CE approaches and addressing areas such as self and symptom management, health promotion and prevention is one way to narrow the gap. CE can take many forms, and partners can include community based groups, agencies such as the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) innovation centers, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) prevention Research Centers, Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) Community Health Centers (CHC) and Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHC), other academic health institutions, or individuals. Collaborators may be engaged in health promotion/prevention, clinical or intervention research.

Community Partnerships to Advance Research (CPAR) (R01)

http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/search-grants.html?keywords=PA-14-142
https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-14-142.html

Current Closing Date for Applications: May 07, 2017

Requests of $500,000 or more for direct costs in any year

This funding opportunity announcement addresses the need for researchers to partner with communities using Community Engaged Research (CEnR) methodologies that will enhance relationships leading to better interventions and positive health outcomes. Partnership is defined as an association of two or more persons or entities that conduct a study as equal co-investigators. Community Engagement (CE) lies on a continuum that reflects the level of involvement of community members, or representatives of community populations, in research. This continuum of involvement in research efforts ranges from community consent to research, to full participation and shared leadership of community members in research design and eventual dissemination and implementation.  Advances in translating research findings into practice have been made; however, such advances have not been realized by all members of society according to age, race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic group. Narrowing the gap in translational research within the NINR strategic areas of emphasis is a priority for the Institute. Using CE approaches and addressing areas such as self and symptom management, health promotion and prevention is one way to narrow the gap. CE can take many forms, and partners can include community based groups, agencies such as the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) innovation centers, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) prevention Research Centers, Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) Community Health Centers (CHC) and Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHC), other academic health institutions, or individuals. Collaborators may be engaged in health promotion/prevention, clinical or intervention research.

Limited PCORI Funding Announcement: Dissemination and Implementation of PCORI

Research Dissemination and Implementation Award

Letter of Intent (LOI) Deadline
February 14, 2017
Application Deadline
May 17, 2017
Total Direct Costs 
$350,000

This Notice encourages PCORI awardees and their patient and stakeholder partners with strategic plans for disseminating and implementing the research results of their PCORI comparative, clinical effectiveness research (CER) awards to consider applying for this forthcoming funding announcement.

PCORI seeks to support the dissemination and implementation (D&I) of patient-centered CER results obtained from PCORI-funded studies.  This opportunity will give PCORI investigators the chance, following the generation of results from their PCORI research award, to propose the next step(s) for making their research results more useful, actionable, and accessible to targeted end-users. This announcement is designed to promote and facilitate the effective and timely use of research evidence in the real world.

Through this PFA, PCORI seeks to fund projects designed to actively disseminate and implement PCORI research results using approaches that are informed and guided by established dissemination and implementation models and frameworks. Successful applications will propose a logical and feasible next step for D&I of clinically meaningful CER finding(s) in order to improve CER finding accessibility, usefulness, uptake, and/or impact among targeted end-users, along with an evaluation plan focusing on an appropriate balance of measurable process and short-, intermediate-, and longer-term outcomes to capture timely information on the effectiveness of the proposed D&I activities.

Specific strategies proposed for disseminating and implementing results of PCORI-funded research projects will vary based on a host of factors, including the finding being disseminated, the population(s) being targeted, and the goals of the D&I effort. PCORI encourages applicants to work closely with relevant stakeholder groups to identify appropriate D&I strategies.  All proposed D&I strategies must actively disseminate/implement findings to targeted end-users and evaluate the success of the D&I strategy. Applications proposing to translate or adapt a finding or product without a plan to actively disseminate or implement it will not be considered responsive.

Examples of appropriate projects include, among others, efforts to:

  • Develop, demonstrate, and evaluate approaches for incorporating results of PCORI-funded research into decision-making settings for patients, providers, policy makers, and other stakeholders.
  • Adapt the content, format, or vehicle for delivering CER research evidence to improve its penetration and use at the policy, health systems, clinical practice, caregiver, and patient levels.
  • Demonstrate the capacity and ability to take research results found effective through PCORI research studies “to scale” in diverse settings and populations.
  • De-implement or reduce the use of interventions that are not evidence based, have been widely adopted prematurely, or are harmful or wasteful.

AHRQ Health Services Research Demonstration and Dissemination Grants (R18)

 May 25, 2017

The Research Demonstration and Dissemination Grant (R18) is an award made by AHRQ to an institution/organization to support a discrete, specified health services research project. The project will be performed by the named investigator and study team. The R18 research plan proposed by the applicant institution/organization must be related to the mission and priority research interests of AHRQ.

The total costs (direct and indirect costs) awarded to a grant under this FOA will not exceed $400,000 annually for the entire project period. An application with a budget that exceeds $400,000 total costs in any given year will not be reviewed

Dissemination and Implementation Research in Health (R01)

R01 Research Project Grant 

June 5, 2017

This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) encourages investigators to submit research grant applications that will identify, develop, test, evaluate and/or refine strategies to disseminate and implement evidence-based practices (e.g. behavioral interventions; prevention, early detection, diagnostic, treatment and disease management interventions; quality improvement programs) into public health, clinical practice, and community settings. In addition, studies to advance dissemination and implementation research methods and measures are encouraged.

Requests of $500,000 or more for direct costs in any year.

Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers (RERCs) Program: RERC on Health, Exercise, and Recreation

Deadline: April 6, 2017
Award Ceiling: $925,000
http://bit.ly/2kcq5f3
Purpose of Program: The purpose of the RERC program is to improve the effectiveness of services authorized under the Rehabilitation Act by conducting advanced engineering research on and development of innovative technologies that are designed to solve particular rehabilitation problems or to remove environmental barriers. RERCs also demonstrate and evaluate such technologies, facilitate service delivery system changes, stimulate the production and distribution of new technologies and equipment in the private sector, and provide training opportunities.

Health for All Adolescents

Wednesday, February 1, 2017, 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. ET
http://bit.ly/2kLeTow
HHS/Office of Adolescent Health (OAH), in partnership with the American Public Health Association, the Partnership for Maternal, Newborn & Child Health, and The Lancet’s Commission on Adolescent Health and Wellbeing: Webinar. Health for All Adolescents. This webinar will provide a closer look at policies and other multi-sectoral factors that affect adolescents worldwide, and will discuss findings from The Lancet report, Our future: a Lancet commission on adolescent health and wellbeing.

The Health Care Policy Debate: Why Does it Matter? What is Your Role?

Tuesday, January 31, 2017, 4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. ET
http://www.aucd.org/template/event.cfm?event_id=7932&id=16
Learn about the current health care policy debate and what policies are important to children, youth, and adults with disabilities and their families. Strategies for successful health care advocacy will also be discussed. This webinar is specifically designed for AUCD network trainees.

Annual Disability Statistics Compendium & State of the Science Conference

February 13-14, 2017, Washington, DC
http://bit.ly/2jZju9R
Registration is FREE. The State of the Science Conference is open for in-person attendance only. The Annual Disability Statistics Compendium offers both in-person and webcast participation options. Please register if you plan to attend in-person or via webcast. The agenda, presenters, and logon procedures (for web viewers) will be emailed to you as they become available.  For questions regarding your registration, please email or call 603-862-4320.

Bridging the gap: from evidence to improved health for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities

Hilton Hotel, Belfast, Northern Ireland


June 19-21, 2017

The IASSIDD Health SIRG will be holding a conference in Belfast, N Ireland on the 19th-21st June 2017 at the Hilton Hotel. The theme of the event is “Bridging the gap: from evidence to improved health for persons with IDD”. An international planning group has been working to organize the conference which will feature keynote addresses by Dr Bev Temple (CANADA) and Prof Roy McConkey (N. IRELAND).

The conference focuses on the following 6 themes:

  • Obesity led by Dr Tessa Hilgenkamp (The NETHERLANDS)
  • Mental health co-led by Prof Angela Hassiotis (UK) and Prof Sally Ann Cooper (SCOTLAND)
  • Frailty and aging led by Prof Hélène Ouellette-Kuntz (CANADA)
  • Mortality co-led by Dr Emily Lauer (USA) and Prof Pauline Heslop (UK)
  • Access to healthcare/primary care guidelines co-led by Dr Matt Hoghton (UK), DR Bill Sullivan (Canada) and Dr Esther Bakker (The NETHERLANDS)
  • Health promotion and healthy environments co-led by Dr Jenneken Naaldenberg (The NETHERLANDS) and Lisa O’Leary (SCOTLAND)

During the two-day conference, a state-of-the-evidence 30-minute lecture (plenary-style) and 1hr workshops/practical sessions will be provided for each theme. Each theme will also have a dedicated space and time for a poster session. Two types of posters will be included: research reports and new conceptualization and theory.

Posters

Accepted posters will be grouped into poster tours. These tours will feature poster authors presenting their research for 5 minutes followed by a short time for discussion. Each tour will be open to all participants. There will be enough time during the conference for participants to visit the other posters.

Registration will be capped at 150 participants per day.

One June 21st, some participants (members of the IASSIDD Health SIRG) will join the planning committee to form small task and finish groups for each theme (4-5 people per theme). These groups will use the time together to develop a plan to produce an ‘outcome’ over the next year. Outcomes are meant to ensure our time together leads to action and may include a journal article, a policy brief, consensus statement or guidelines, or a research proposal.

Awards

The best poster overall will be awarded the MAHM “Frans Scholten Award” of €1000. The best poster by a student (first author and presenter) and the best poster by an early career researcher* (first author and presenter) will also each receive €1000. *early career researchers are individuals within 10 years of obtaining their last degree.

Social Event

Monday June 19th at 7pm: Tour and Dinner at the Crumlin Road Gaol, Belfast historical landmark (http://www.crumlinroadgaol.com/).

• Includes a glass of wine on arrival, a 30-minute tour of the gaol, a four-course meal, wine with dinner, and an Irish band

• 20-minute walk from the Hilton Hotel or a short taxi ride

• only 75 USD per person.

The Crumlin Road Gaol dates back to 1845 and closed its doors as a working prison in 1996. After extensive renovations the gaol re opened as a visitor attraction and conference centre. Today you can take a guided tour of the prison and hear about the history of the site from when women and children were held within its walls through to the political segregation of republican and loyalist prisoners and learn about why the decision was taken to close the prison. During the tour of the gaol you will view all four wings from the architecturally-stunning gaol circle and of course pay a visit to the condemned man’s cell before seeing the execution cell where the majority of the 17 men were hanged.

Important Dates:

  • December 15, 2016 – abstract submissions open
  • February 15, 2017 – abstract submissions close
  • March 15, 2017 – communication of acceptance or non-acceptance to presenters
  • April 15, 2017 – early bird registration deadline

(Register for the Conference at www.iassidd.org)

June 19 & 20, 2017 – join us in Belfast!