Civic Engagement Toolbox For Self-Advocates | Autistic Self Advocacy Network

Right now, many people are getting involved in political advocacy for the first time. People are going to town hall meetings and making phone calls to their members of Congress. They’re writing letters and using social media to organize advocacy groups.This new wave of political advocacy is incredible. And people with disabilities need to be a part of that. That’s why we’re pleased to announce a new series of plain language toolkits. These toolkits focus on the basics of civic engagement. Civic engagement means actively participating in our democracy. In a democracy, regular people choose, or elect, who gets to be in government. The people we elect should listen to our concerns and advocate for us in the government. But when they don’t do that, we have the right to make our voices heard. In short, civic engagement means:learning about how the government works, andmaking sure that the people we elect to government listen to us.They Work For Us: A Self-Advocate’s Guide to Getting Through to your Elected OfficialsThe first toolkit is “They Work For Us: A Self-Advocate’s Guide to Getting Through to your Elected Officials.” This toolkit is about:who our elected officials are, andwhat strategies self-advocates can use to get our voices heard by the people we elect to represent us.They Work For Us covers:Who our elected officials areHow to contact your elected officialsStrategies, scripts, and templates to help you effectively communicate with your elected officialsHow to use social media for political advocacySome parts of the toolkit are available as short stand-alone fact sheets. Click the links below to download the toolkit and fact sheets as PDF files. The PDFs are screenreader-accessible.They Work For Us: A Self-Advocate’s Guide to Getting Through to your Elected OfficialsFact Sheet: How to Call Your Elected OfficialsFact Sheet: In-Person Meetings with Elected OfficialsFact Sheet: Sending Elected Officials Emails, Letters, and Faxes

Source: Civic Engagement Toolbox For Self-Advocates | Autistic Self Advocacy Network

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MDABLE: MARYLAND ABLE (Achieving a Better Life Experience)

ABLE (Achieving a Better Life Experience) makes it easier than ever to save money for all of your disability-related needs. More independence, greater financial security and a better quality of life – that’s the future Maryland ABLE is building. MD ABLE accounts are a new way to help individuals with disabilities save money and pay for qualified disability-related expenses without jeopardizing federal means-tested benefits such as SSI or Medicaid. Governor Hogan signed the Achieving a Better Life Experience

Source: MDABLE

ABLE (Achieving a Better Life Experience) makes it easier than ever to save money for all of your disability-related needs.

More independence, greater financial security and a better quality of life – that’s the future Maryland ABLE is building. MD ABLE accounts are a new way to help individuals with disabilities save money and pay for qualified disability-related expenses without jeopardizing federal means-tested benefits such as SSI or Medicaid.

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Human Development Institute: H+W – HealthMatters

Source: H+W – HealthMatters

The Health & Wellness Initiative at the Human Development Institute at the University of Kentucky has partnered with the authors of HealthMatters curriculum from the University of Illinois at Chicago to provide a statewide roll out of online based training for staff around the state to become instructors within their community supports for the HealthMatters program. This evidence-based curriculum includes everything community based organizations need to run successful health promotion program for individual with intellectual and developmental disabilities.  Participants have reported feeling healthier, feeling better about themselves, and have started incorporating what they’ve learned from the health promotion programming into their daily lives.  Within the HealthMatters pages and links, you will find valuable resources for your HealthMatters programming. Please use these resources to make your programming as fun and effective as possible!

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Resubmissions Revisited: Funded Resubmission Applications and Their Initial Peer Review Scores

“My first submission got an overall impact score of 30. Is that good enough? What’s the likelihood I’ll eventually get this funded?”, or, “My first submission was not even discussed. Now what? Does anyone with an undiscussed grant bother to resubmit? And what’s the likelihood I’ll eventually get this funded?” In a past blog we provided some general advice and data to help you consider these types of questions, and obviously the answers depend on specifics — but even so, based on your feedback and comments

Source: Resubmissions Revisited: Funded Resubmission Applications and Their Initial Peer Review Scores | NIH Extramural Nexus

In a past blog we provided some general advice and data to help you consider these types of questions, and obviously the answers depend on specifics — but even so, based on your feedback and comments we thought it would be informative to offer high-level descriptive data on resubmission and award rates according to the first-time score, that is, the overall impact score on the A0 submission.

Here we describe the outcomes of 83,722 unsolicited A0 R01 applications submitted in fiscal years 2012 through 2016. Of these, 69,714 (or 83%) were “Type 1” (de novo) applications, while 14,008 (or 17%) were “Type 2” (or competing renewal) applications.

Let’s begin with looking at award rates: as a reminder, award rates are the total number of awards divided by the total number of applications. Figure 1 shows the award rate of these A0 applications broken out by type 1 (de novo) vs type 2 (competing renewals). (If you’re interested in looking at new and competing renewals in aggregate, for this and the following figures, these are shown in the Excel file we’ve posted to the RePORT website.)

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Federal Register: Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, President’s Committee for People With Intellectual Disabilities

Source: Federal Register: Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, President’s Committee for People With Intellectual Disabilities

AGENCY:

Administration for Community Living, HHS.

ACTION:

Notice.

DATES:

Thursday, March 23, 2017 from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.; and Friday, March 24, 2017 from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.

These meetings will be open to the general public.

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Events | Managing Work, Life, and Disability: Considerations for Individuals and Employers

Source: Events | Yang Tan Institute

Managing Work, Life, and Disability: Considerations for Individuals and Employers

Thursday, March 16, 2017 from 10:00 AM to 11:15 AM

This session will be jointly presented by LaWanda Cook of Cornell University’s Yang-Tan Institute on Employment and Disability (YTI), Michael Murray of the American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD), and Jill Houghton of the U.S. Business Leadership Network (USBLN). It will include an overview of findings from YTI’s Work-Life Balance and Disability Study and provide insights from the perspectives of employees with disabilities, as well as suggestions for what employers can do to contribute to employees’ effective work-life management.

Expo Conference Materials

2016 KT Conference

This section of the Expo features archived presentations and files from the 2016 KT Conference. These include captioned YouTube videos, edited transcripts, and downloadable copies of presentation files (PDF and text versions). This Conference Archive is pre-approved for 10 hours CRC-CEUs through 12-11-17. You must complete an evaluation to receive your verification of completion form.

Source: Expo Conference Materials