“Bite Sized” Exercises and Discussion Prompts to Reinforce Culture

Source: Planetree.org

“Bite Sized” Exercises and Discussion Prompts to Reinforce Culture

Below is a collection of discussion prompts and exercises designed to engage the hearts and minds of all members of the team in the practice patient-centered transformation effort. These exercises are designed to be concise enough to be incorporated into brief huddles or team meetings. Specifically, these exercises are designed to:

  • Help all members of the team reconnect to the joy of practice
  • Re-sensitize them to the patient experience.
  • Learn specific techniques for connecting with patients, remaining present and delivering care with compassion – even when it is most difficult to do so.
  • It is recommended that exercises like these be regularly incorporated into operations as a means of nurturing an understanding of patient-centered care and the responsibility and opportunity for each member of the care team to embody those values.

Exercises to Understand the Patient Experience

  • Trace the path a patient takes from arrival at the office through to registration to the waiting room to the exam room and to check-out. What do they see? What barriers may then encounter? Is the signage they encounter informative? Does the environment (including the signage) convey warmth and compassion? Trace patients’ steps using a walker and/or a wheelchair. Ask yourselves the same questions. Better yet, do this exercise alongside patient representatives.
  • Pair up with a colleague. Share a brief personal story with your partner (2-3 minutes, does not need to be overly personal). Initially, tell the story with your partner sitting down and you standing up; then both sitting at the same level. Switch roles. Together, identify specific behaviors that created a sense of connection as you shared.
  • Role play a typical patient interaction in your exam rooms. Observe how the set-up of the room either facilitates eye contact and personal connection or inhibits it, specifically in consideration of how you use the EHR. Consider placement of the computer screen, availability and height of chairs, etc. Better yet, complete this exercise alongside patient representatives.
  • Sit in an exam room on the table for 10 minutes, just as a patient would (though they wouldn’t know in advance how long they would be waiting.) Take note of the environment of the exam room. Is there anything to keep you occupied? What can you hear going on outside the room? How does it feel to sit there?

Questions to ask your doctor about patient-centered care

Source: Planetree.org

Patient-Centered Primary Care Collaborative (PCPCC)

Questions to ask your doctor about patient-centered care

Sample questions:

  1. What type of information will you provide to me about my condition and treatment options?
  2. Will you provide me with decision aids that will help me to make the best individualized care decisions?
  3. Am I able to access a patient portal to help me manage my personal health information?
  4. Am I able to update and contribute to the information in the patient portal or just review it?
  5. Am I able to review the doctor’s notes in my record? Do I have the option of adding my own information and perspectives into my record for the doctor to read and review?
  6. When my care team meets to discuss my plan of care, will I be invited to participate in those discussions?
  7. Is there a way for me to securely send questions/messages to my doctor in advance of (or outside of) a scheduled appointment?

Improving Your Person and Family Engagement Metrics in TCPI | Patient-Centered Primary Care Collaborative

Source: Improving Your Person and Family Engagement Metrics in TCPI | Patient-Centered Primary Care Collaborative

The Patient Centered Primary Care Collaborative Support and Alignment Network (PCPCC SAN) was created to assist staff and leaders in Practice Transformation Networks, along with enrolled clinicians, to successfully transform their practices to deliver person and family centered care. In 2017 the TCPI is adopting 6 measures of person and family engagement (PFE).  On this page, we describe the measures and offer links to websites where you can download tools, information, and other educational materials.

“Bite Sized” Exercises and Discussion Prompts to Reinforce Culture

Questions to ask your doctor about patient-centered care

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What Would Happen If Health Care in Your State Improved? – The Commonwealth Fund

This interactive tool shows the health care gains your state could achieve by improving its performance on measures of access, quality, and health outcomes. The tool draws on data from the 2015 Commonwealth Fund Scorecard on State Health System Performance.

Source: What Would Happen If Health Care in Your State Improved? – The Commonwealth Fund

The Commonwealth Fund’s Scorecard on State Health System Performance, 2017 Edition, assessed states on more than 40 indicators of health care access, quality, costs, and outcomes. Use this interactive tool to see the gains that your state could achieve by improving its performance to the level of better-performing states, as well as the losses that would result if your state failed to sustain its performance. You can also see the impact of reaching for a goal that is even better than the current best state’s performance.

In a new To the Point post, The Commonwealth Fund’s David Radley, Douglas McCarthy, and Susan Hayes show how states can use the tool to help achieve their goals. For example, by seeing the gains made in states that have already expanded Medicaid, policymakers in Georgia or another non-expansion state can calculate the improvements in insurance coverage and access to care that are within their reach.

Eugene Washington PCORI Engagement Awards

The healthcare research process traditionally includes only scientists and other research-related professionals. PCORI believes that engagement of nontraditional stakeholders—from topic selection through design and conduct of research to dissemination of results—can influence research to be more patient centered, useful, and trustworthy, and ultimately lead to greater use of research results by patients and the broader healthcare community.

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RWJF Health Data for Action

RWJF Health Data for Action – The HD4A program will fund innovative research that uses the available data to answer important research questions. Applicants under this Call for Proposals (CFP) will write a proposal for a research study using data from either the Health Care Cost Institute (HCCI) or athenahealth. Successful applicants will be provided with access to these data, which are described in greater detail below. The HCCI and athenahealth data provide a wealth of private claims data and rich detail on care delivery and patient obesity-related measures, respectively. The proposed studies should enable relevant, innovative, and actionable research that uses the available data to answer important, policy-relevant questions.

NICHD Exploratory/Developmental Research Grant (R21)

The NICHD Exploratory/Developmental Grant program supports exploratory and developmental research projects that fall within the NICHD mission by providing support for the early and conceptual stages of these projects. These studies may involve considerable risk but may lead to a breakthrough in a particular area, or to the development of novel techniques, agents, methodologies, models, or applications that could have a major impact on a field of biomedical, behavioral, or clinical research.

Posted Date

April 20, 2017

Open Date (Earliest Submission Date)

May 16, 2017

Expiration Date

May 8, 2020

Purpose/Research Objectives

The NICHD Exploratory/Developmental Grant program supports exploratory and developmental research projects that fall within the NICHD mission by providing support for the early and conceptual stages of these projects. These studies may involve considerable risk but may lead to a breakthrough in a particular area, or to the development of novel techniques, agents, methodologies, models, or applications that could have a major impact on a field of biomedical, behavioral, or clinical research.

The evolution and vitality of the biomedical, behavioral, and clinical sciences require a constant infusion of new ideas, techniques, and points of view. These may differ substantially from current thinking or practice and may not yet be supported by substantial preliminary data. Through the NICHD Exploratory/Developmental Research Grant Program, the NIH seeks to foster the introduction of novel scientific ideas, model systems, tools, agents, targets, and technologies that have the potential to substantially advance biomedical, behavioral, and clinical research within the NICHD scientific mission.

This program is intended to encourage new exploratory and developmental research projects. For example, such projects could assess the feasibility of a novel area of investigation or a new experimental system that has the potential to enhance health-related research. Another example could include the unique and innovative use of an existing methodology to explore a new scientific area.

Specific Areas of Research Interest

Areas of research covered by the proposed R21 projects must fall within the scientific missions of the twelve Scientific Branches of the NICHD Division of Extramural Research (DER) or the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research (NCMRR).  Details about those scientific missions and program staff contacts may be found on the web pages for the DER scientific branches at: http://www.nichd.nih.gov/about/org/der/branches/Pages/index.aspx and the NCMRR at:  http://www.nichd.nih.gov/about/org/ncmrr/Pages/overview.aspx.  Specific research priorities of DER branches and NCMRR are listed as follows.

Social Support Networks of Aging Persons with Intellectual Disabilities

Play Recording

Presented by: Lieke van Heumen, PhD

This webinar will discuss emerging research and practice in supporting social networks of adults aging with intellectual disabilities. After a brief introduction on aging in this population, the webinar will discuss the role of social relations in later life and address the state of knowledge regarding the social support networks of older adults with intellectual disabilities. The webinar will provide a discussion of the role of support services in promoting informal networks and conclude with an exploration of the use of social network mapping and life story work in person-centered planning.

Lieke van Heumen is a postdoctoral research fellow at the Department of Disability and Human Development, University of Illinois at Chicago. Lieke’s primary research interest is the intersection of aging and disability with a focus on supports that contribute to aging well. She believes retrieving the lived experiences of older adults with disabilities by means of inclusive and accessible research methods is key to assuring the meaningful engagement of adults with disabilities in the research process.