What Would Happen If Health Care in Your State Improved? – The Commonwealth Fund

This interactive tool shows the health care gains your state could achieve by improving its performance on measures of access, quality, and health outcomes. The tool draws on data from the 2015 Commonwealth Fund Scorecard on State Health System Performance.

Source: What Would Happen If Health Care in Your State Improved? – The Commonwealth Fund

The Commonwealth Fund’s Scorecard on State Health System Performance, 2017 Edition, assessed states on more than 40 indicators of health care access, quality, costs, and outcomes. Use this interactive tool to see the gains that your state could achieve by improving its performance to the level of better-performing states, as well as the losses that would result if your state failed to sustain its performance. You can also see the impact of reaching for a goal that is even better than the current best state’s performance.

In a new To the Point post, The Commonwealth Fund’s David Radley, Douglas McCarthy, and Susan Hayes show how states can use the tool to help achieve their goals. For example, by seeing the gains made in states that have already expanded Medicaid, policymakers in Georgia or another non-expansion state can calculate the improvements in insurance coverage and access to care that are within their reach.

Eugene Washington PCORI Engagement Awards

The healthcare research process traditionally includes only scientists and other research-related professionals. PCORI believes that engagement of nontraditional stakeholders—from topic selection through design and conduct of research to dissemination of results—can influence research to be more patient centered, useful, and trustworthy, and ultimately lead to greater use of research results by patients and the broader healthcare community.

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RWJF Health Data for Action

RWJF Health Data for Action – The HD4A program will fund innovative research that uses the available data to answer important research questions. Applicants under this Call for Proposals (CFP) will write a proposal for a research study using data from either the Health Care Cost Institute (HCCI) or athenahealth. Successful applicants will be provided with access to these data, which are described in greater detail below. The HCCI and athenahealth data provide a wealth of private claims data and rich detail on care delivery and patient obesity-related measures, respectively. The proposed studies should enable relevant, innovative, and actionable research that uses the available data to answer important, policy-relevant questions.

NICHD Exploratory/Developmental Research Grant (R21)

The NICHD Exploratory/Developmental Grant program supports exploratory and developmental research projects that fall within the NICHD mission by providing support for the early and conceptual stages of these projects. These studies may involve considerable risk but may lead to a breakthrough in a particular area, or to the development of novel techniques, agents, methodologies, models, or applications that could have a major impact on a field of biomedical, behavioral, or clinical research.

Posted Date

April 20, 2017

Open Date (Earliest Submission Date)

May 16, 2017

Expiration Date

May 8, 2020

Purpose/Research Objectives

The NICHD Exploratory/Developmental Grant program supports exploratory and developmental research projects that fall within the NICHD mission by providing support for the early and conceptual stages of these projects. These studies may involve considerable risk but may lead to a breakthrough in a particular area, or to the development of novel techniques, agents, methodologies, models, or applications that could have a major impact on a field of biomedical, behavioral, or clinical research.

The evolution and vitality of the biomedical, behavioral, and clinical sciences require a constant infusion of new ideas, techniques, and points of view. These may differ substantially from current thinking or practice and may not yet be supported by substantial preliminary data. Through the NICHD Exploratory/Developmental Research Grant Program, the NIH seeks to foster the introduction of novel scientific ideas, model systems, tools, agents, targets, and technologies that have the potential to substantially advance biomedical, behavioral, and clinical research within the NICHD scientific mission.

This program is intended to encourage new exploratory and developmental research projects. For example, such projects could assess the feasibility of a novel area of investigation or a new experimental system that has the potential to enhance health-related research. Another example could include the unique and innovative use of an existing methodology to explore a new scientific area.

Specific Areas of Research Interest

Areas of research covered by the proposed R21 projects must fall within the scientific missions of the twelve Scientific Branches of the NICHD Division of Extramural Research (DER) or the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research (NCMRR).  Details about those scientific missions and program staff contacts may be found on the web pages for the DER scientific branches at: http://www.nichd.nih.gov/about/org/der/branches/Pages/index.aspx and the NCMRR at:  http://www.nichd.nih.gov/about/org/ncmrr/Pages/overview.aspx.  Specific research priorities of DER branches and NCMRR are listed as follows.

Social Support Networks of Aging Persons with Intellectual Disabilities

Play Recording

Presented by: Lieke van Heumen, PhD

This webinar will discuss emerging research and practice in supporting social networks of adults aging with intellectual disabilities. After a brief introduction on aging in this population, the webinar will discuss the role of social relations in later life and address the state of knowledge regarding the social support networks of older adults with intellectual disabilities. The webinar will provide a discussion of the role of support services in promoting informal networks and conclude with an exploration of the use of social network mapping and life story work in person-centered planning.

Lieke van Heumen is a postdoctoral research fellow at the Department of Disability and Human Development, University of Illinois at Chicago. Lieke’s primary research interest is the intersection of aging and disability with a focus on supports that contribute to aging well. She believes retrieving the lived experiences of older adults with disabilities by means of inclusive and accessible research methods is key to assuring the meaningful engagement of adults with disabilities in the research process.

Atlas on the Primary Care of Adults with Developmental Disabilities in Ontario

Download: Atlas on the Primary Care of Adults with Developmental Disabilities in Ontario

Source: ICES

Lunsky Y, Klein-Geltink JE, Yates EA, editors. December 2013

The Issue

Ontario’s Action Plan for Health Care focuses on becoming healthier, with improved access to integrated family/primary care and a major emphasis on the provision of the right care at the right time and in the right place. These priorities are particularly relevant to individuals with developmental disabilities: research from other jurisdictions would suggest that they have higher rates of preventable diseases, greater challenges obtaining guideline-recommended primary care3 and higher associated health care costs.4 However, the health status and

health care of adults with developmental disabilities have not been well studied in Ontario, due to the absence of population-based data. The work of the Health Care Access Research and Developmental Disabilities (H-CARDD) Program is in direct response to Ontario’s call to action through addressing this data gap. The first H-CARDD project, conducted in partnership with decision makers and clinicians from the health and social services sectors, has focused on primary care.

The Study

The Atlas on the Primary Care of Adults with Developmental Disabilities in Ontario provides, for the first time in Canada, descriptive information on the health of adults with developmental disabilities in Ontario and examines the quality of their primary care relative to adults without developmental disabilities. Findings have relevance in Ontario and in other jurisdictions where there is interest in improving health care and the health status of those with developmental disabilities.

Revised ACA Repeal and Replace Bill Likely to Increase the Uninsured Rate and Health Insurance Costs for Many

House Republicans are close to agreeing on an amended version of the American Health Care Act, their proposed repeal and replacement of the Affordable Care Act. David Blumenthal, M.D., and Sara Collins say that, based on the summaries circulated by the media, the revised bill will significantly increase the numbers of uninsured Americans while raising insurance costs for many of the nation’s most vulnerable citizens. At the same time, the bill’s restructuring of the Medicaid program is likely to hurt state economies and enrollees.

Source: Revised ACA Repeal and Replace Bill Likely to Increase the Uninsured Rate and Health Insurance Costs for Many – The Commonwealth Fund

News outlets report that House Republicans are close to agreeing on an amended version of the American Health Care Act (AHCA), their proposed repeal and replacement of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The all-important legislative language for the revised bill is not yet available, nor are Congressional Budget Office (CBO) projections of its effects on coverage and the budget, so any analyses are necessarily tentative.

Nevertheless, the summaries leaked to the media offer insight on the amended bill. If accurate, those summaries suggest that the revised AHCA will significantly increase the numbers of uninsured Americans, raise the cost of insurance for many of the nation’s most vulnerable citizens, and, as originally proposed in the AHCA, cut and reconfigure the Medicaid program. The new amendment specifically allows states to weaken consumer protections by, for example, permitting insurers to charge people with preexisting conditions higher premiums.

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CompareMaine

CompareMaine shows the average cost of common healthcare procedures at different facilities in Maine. You can also see patient experience ratings and how Maine hospitals compare on patient safety.

Source: CompareMaine

more information. better decisions.

Compare Costs of Healthcare Procedures and Quality of Care Across Maine

The Maine Health Data Organization, in collaboration with the Maine Quality Forum, is required by law to promote the transparency of healthcare cost and quality information via a publicly accessible website. The cost and quality of healthcare procedures can vary widely among providers. You have a choice in where you receive care. CompareMaine shows the average cost of common healthcare procedures at different facilities in Maine. You can also see patient experience ratings and how Maine hospitals compare on patient safety.

The cost estimates on CompareMaine are median payments. They are meant to serve as a reference point for comparison. In order to find out your actual payment, please contact your insurance company. If you do not have insurance, please contact the facility that you are interested in. When contacted directly, facilities often report their charges which may be higher than the actual payments they receive from insurance companies and patients.

Breaking Stereotypes: Spotlight on Male Family Caregivers

In the United States, family caregivers are the backbone for the delivery of supportive services for individuals with a chronic, disabling, or serious health condition. 40 percent of family caregivers of adults are men—which equates to 16 million male family caregivers in the United States.

Source: Breaking Stereotypes: Spotlight on Male Family Caregivers

They identify, arrange, and coordinate services and supports; provide emotional support; accompany their family member or friend to health provider visits; administer medications; assist with personal care (such as bathing and dressing); pay bills and deal with health insurance; and perform other vital activities to help individuals remain in their homes and communities for as long as possible.

Full Report

Although the “typical” family caregiver is a 49-year-old woman who takes care of a relative, caregivers on the whole are becoming as diverse as the American population. Men, a group traditionally not recognized for performing caregiving tasks, are rising to the challenge. These husbands, brothers, sons, sons-in-law, partners, friends, and neighbors are joining, either by choice or necessity, the army of family caregivers providing care across the country. However, there is a paucity of research that has exclusively examined the impact of caregiving within and among diverse male family caregivers. Prior studies were predominately qualitative in nature and several had methodological challenges, including small sample sizes that limited the generalizability of the findings.

Using data from the Caregiving in the U.S. 2015 survey, this Spotlight highlights male family caregivers, providing current information about the experiences and challenges facing them today.

Related Links: 

Caregiving in the United States 2015

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