Civic Engagement Toolbox For Self-Advocates | Autistic Self Advocacy Network

Right now, many people are getting involved in political advocacy for the first time. People are going to town hall meetings and making phone calls to their members of Congress. They’re writing letters and using social media to organize advocacy groups.This new wave of political advocacy is incredible. And people with disabilities need to be a part of that. That’s why we’re pleased to announce a new series of plain language toolkits. These toolkits focus on the basics of civic engagement. Civic engagement means actively participating in our democracy. In a democracy, regular people choose, or elect, who gets to be in government. The people we elect should listen to our concerns and advocate for us in the government. But when they don’t do that, we have the right to make our voices heard. In short, civic engagement means:learning about how the government works, andmaking sure that the people we elect to government listen to us.They Work For Us: A Self-Advocate’s Guide to Getting Through to your Elected OfficialsThe first toolkit is “They Work For Us: A Self-Advocate’s Guide to Getting Through to your Elected Officials.” This toolkit is about:who our elected officials are, andwhat strategies self-advocates can use to get our voices heard by the people we elect to represent us.They Work For Us covers:Who our elected officials areHow to contact your elected officialsStrategies, scripts, and templates to help you effectively communicate with your elected officialsHow to use social media for political advocacySome parts of the toolkit are available as short stand-alone fact sheets. Click the links below to download the toolkit and fact sheets as PDF files. The PDFs are screenreader-accessible.They Work For Us: A Self-Advocate’s Guide to Getting Through to your Elected OfficialsFact Sheet: How to Call Your Elected OfficialsFact Sheet: In-Person Meetings with Elected OfficialsFact Sheet: Sending Elected Officials Emails, Letters, and Faxes

Source: Civic Engagement Toolbox For Self-Advocates | Autistic Self Advocacy Network

This new wave of political advocacy is incredible. And people with disabilities need to be a part of that.That’s why we’re pleased to announce a new series of plain language toolkits. These toolkits focus on the basics of civic engagement. Civic engagement means actively participating in our democracy. In a democracy, regular people choose, or elect, who gets to be in government. The people we elect should listen to our concerns and advocate for us in the government. But when they don’t do that, we have the right to make our voices heard. In short, civic engagement means:

  • learning about how the government works, and
  • making sure that the people we elect to government listen to us.

They Work For Us: A Self-Advocate’s Guide to Getting Through to your Elected Officials

The first toolkit is “They Work For Us: A Self-Advocate’s Guide to Getting Through to your Elected Officials.” This toolkit is about:

  • who our elected officials are, and
  • what strategies self-advocates can use to get our voices heard by the people we elect to represent us.

They Work For Us covers:

  • Who our elected officials are
  • How to contact your elected officials
  • Strategies, scripts, and templates to help you effectively communicate with your elected officials
  • How to use social media for political advocacy

Some parts of the toolkit are available as short stand-alone fact sheets. Click the links below to download the toolkit and fact sheets as PDF files. The PDFs are screenreader-accessible.

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