Community Partnerships to Advance Research (CPAR) (R15)

https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-14-140.html

https://www.nichd.nih.gov/grants-funding/opportunities-mechanisms/mechanisms-types/comparison-mechanisms/Pages/default.aspx

Current Closing Date for Applications: May 07, 2017

Applicants may request up to $300,000 in direct costs plus applicable Facilities & Administrative (F&A)/indirect costs for the entire project period of up to 3 years.

This funding opportunity announcement addresses the need for researchers to partner with communities using Community Engaged Research (CEnR) methodologies that will enhance relationships leading to better interventions and positive health outcomes. Partnership is defined as an association of two or more persons or entities that conduct a study as equal co-investigators. Community Engagement (CE) lies on a continuum that reflects the level of involvement of community members, or representatives of community populations, in research. This continuum of involvement in research efforts ranges from community consent to research, to full participation and shared leadership of community members in research design and eventual dissemination and implementation.  Advances in translating research findings into practice have been made; however, such advances have not been realized by all members of society according to age, race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic group. Narrowing the gap in translational research within the NINR strategic areas of emphasis is a priority for the Institute. Using CE approaches and addressing areas such as self and symptom management, health promotion and prevention is one way to narrow the gap. CE can take many forms, and partners can include community based groups, agencies such as the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) innovation centers, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) prevention Research Centers, Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) Community Health Centers (CHC) and Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHC), other academic health institutions, or individuals. Collaborators may be engaged in health promotion/prevention, clinical or intervention research.

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